Linux IP Masquerade HOWTO

Posted on 4:29 PM by Bharathvn

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Table of Contents
1. Introduction
1.1. Introduction to IP Masquerading or IP MASQ
1.2. Foreword, Feedback & Credits
1.3. Copyright & Disclaimer


2. Background Knowledge
2.1. What is IP Masquerade?
2.2. Current Status
2.3. Who Can Benefit From IP Masquerade?
2.4. Who Doesn't Need IP Masquerade?
2.5. How does IP Masquerade Work?
2.6. Requirements for IP Masquerade on Linux 2.4.x
2.7. Requirements for IP Masquerade on Linux 2.2.x
2.8. Requirements for IP Masquerade on Linux 2.0.x


3. Setting Up IP Masquerade
3.1. Compiling a new kernel if needed
3.2. Checking your existing kernel for MASQ functionality
3.2.1. Compiling Linux 2.4.x Kernels
3.2.2. Compiling Linux 2.2.x Kernels
3.2.3. Compiling Linux 2.0.x Kernels


3.3. Assigning Private Network IP Addresses to the Internal LAN
3.4. Configuring IP Forwarding Policies
3.4.1. Configuring IP Masquerade on Linux 2.6.x and 2.4.x Kernels
3.4.2. Configuring IP Masquerade on Linux 2.2.x Kernels
3.4.3. Configuring IP Masquerade on Linux 2.0.x Kernels




4. Configuring the other internal to-be MASQed machines
4.1. Configuring Microsoft Windows 95 and OSR2
4.2. Configuring Windows NT
4.3. Configuring Windows for Workgroup 3.11
4.4. Configuring UNIX Based Systems
4.5. Configuring DOS using NCSA Telnet package
4.6. Configuring MacOS Based System Running MacTCP
4.7. Configuring MacOS Based System Running Open Transport
4.8. Configuring Novell network using DNS
4.9. Configuring OS/2 Warp
4.10. Configuring OS/400 on a IBM AS/400
4.11. Configuring Other Systems


5. Testing IP Masquerade
5.1. Loading up the rc.firewall ruleset
5.2. Testing internal MASQ client PC connectivity
5.3. Testing internal MASQ client to MASQ server connectivity
5.4. Testing internal MASQ server connectivity
5.5. Testing internal MASQ server to MASQ client connectivity
5.6. Testing External MASQ server Internet connectivity
5.7. Testing internal MASQ client to external MASQ server connectivity
5.8. Testing external MASQ ICMP forwarding
5.9. Testing MASQ functionality without DNS
5.10. Testing MASQ functionality with DNS resolution
5.11. Testing more MASQ functionality with DNS
5.12. Any remaining functional, performance, etc. issues...


6. Other IP Masquerade Issues and Software Support
6.1. Problems with IP Masquerade
6.2. Incoming services
6.3. Supported Client Software and Other Setup Notes
6.3.1. Network Clients that -Work- with IP Masquerade
6.3.2. Clients that do not have full support in IP MASQ:


6.4. Stronger firewall rulesets to run after initial testing
6.4.1. Stronger IP Firewall (IPTABLES) rulesets
6.4.2. Stronger IP Firewall (IPCHAINS) rulesets
6.4.3. Stronger IP Firewall (IPFWADM) Rulesets


6.5. IP Masquerading multiple internal networks
6.5.1. iptables support for multiple internal lans
6.5.2. ipchains support for multiple internal lans
6.5.3. ipfwadm support for multiple internal lans


6.6. IP Masquerade and Dial-on-Demand Connections
6.7. Port Forwarding with IPTABLES or external tools like IPPORTFW,
IPMASQADM, IPAUTOFW, REDIR, UDPRED, and other Port Forwarding tools
6.7.1. IPTABLES-based PORTFWD'ing: Using IPTABLES's PREROUTING option
for 2.6.x and 2.4.x kernels
6.7.2. IPMASQADM-based PORTFWD'ing: Using IPMASQADM with 2.2.x
kernels
6.7.3. IPPORTFW-based PORTFWD'ing: Using IPPORTFW on 2.0.x kernels


6.8. CU-SeeMe and Linux IP-Masquerade
6.9. Mirabilis ICQ
6.10. Gamers: The LooseUDP patch


7. Frequently Asked Questions
7.1. ( Distro ) - What Linux Distributions support IP Masquerading?
7.2. ( Requirements ) - What are the minimum hardware requirements and
any limitations for IP Masquerade? How well does it perform?
7.3. ( Errors ) - When I run my specific rc.firewall-* ruleset, I get
"command not found" errors. Why?
7.4. ( Still wont work ) - I've checked all my configurations, I still
can't get IP Masquerade to work. What should I do?
7.5. ( Email list ) - How do I join or view the IP Masquerade and/or IP
Masqurade Developers mailing lists and archives?
7.6. ( NAT vs. Proxy ) - How does IP Masquerade differ from Proxy or NAT
services?
7.7. ( GUI ) - Are there any GUI firewall creation/management tools?
7.8. ( MASQ and Dynamic IPs ) - Does IP Masquerade work with dynamically
assigned IP addresses?
7.9. ( MASQ and various networks ) - Can I use a cable modem (both
bi-directional and with modem returns), DSL, satellite link, etc. to
connect to the Internet and use IP Masquerade?
7.10. ( Dial on Demand ) - Can I use Diald or the Dial-on-Demand feature
of PPPd with IP MASQ?
7.11. ( Apps ) - What applications are supported with IP Masquerade?
7.12. ( Distro Setup ) - How can I get IP Masquerade running on Redhat,
Debian, Slackware, etc.?
7.13. ( Timeouts ) - Connections seem to break if I don't use them often.
Why is that?
7.14. ( Odd Behavior ) - When my Internet connection first comes up,
nothing works. If I try again, everything then works fine. Why is
this?
7.15. ( MTU ) - IP MASQ seems to be working fine but some sites don't
work. This usually happens with WWW and some FTP sites.
7.15.1. Enabling PMTU Clamping for PPPoE and some PPP Users:
7.15.2. Clamping the MSS via IPTABLES:
7.15.3. Changing the External MTU of the MASQ server:
7.15.4. Changing the MTU of various operating systems:


7.16. ( FTP ) - MASQed FTP clients don't work.
7.17. ( Performance ) - IP Masquerading seems slow
7.18. ( PORTFW ) - IP Masquerading with PORTFWing seems to break when my
line is idle for long periods
7.19. ( PORTFW - Locally ) - I can't reach my PORTFWed server from the
INTERNAL lan
7.20. ( Logs ) - Now that I have IP Masquerading up, I'm getting all
sorts of weird notices and errors in the SYSLOG log files. How do I
read the IPTABLES/IPCHAINS/IPFWADM firewall errors?
7.21. ( Log Reduction ) - My logs are filling up with packet hits due to
the new "stronger" rulesets. How can I fix this?
7.22. ( MASQ Security ) - Can I configure IP MASQ to allow Internet users
to directly contact internal MASQed servers?
7.23. ( Free Ports ) - I'm getting "kernel: ip_masq_new(proto=UDP): no
free ports." in my SYSLOG files. Whats up?
7.24. ( SETSOCKOPT ) - I'm getting "ipfwadm: setsockopt failed: Protocol
not available" when I try to use IPPORTFW!
7.25. ( SAMBA ) - Microsoft File and Print Sharing and Microsoft Domain
clients don't work through IP Masq!
7.26. ( IDENT ) - IRC won't work properly for MASQed IRC users. Why?
7.27. ( IRC DCC ) - mIRC doesn't work with DCC Sends
7.28. ( IP Aliasing ) - Can IP Masquerade work with only ONE Ethernet
network card?
7.29. ( Multiple-LANs ) - I have two MASQed LANs but they cannot
communicate with each other!
7.30. ( SHAPING ) - I want to be able to limit the speed of specific
types of traffic
7.31. ( ACCOUNTING ) - I need to do accounting on who is using the
network
7.32. ( MULTIPLE IPs - DMZ segments) - I have several EXTERNAL IP
addresses that I want to PORTFW to several internal machines. How do
I do this?
7.33. ( 1:1 NAT ) - I'd like to do 1:1 NAT but I can't figure out how to
do it
7.34. ( Netstat ) - I'm trying to use the NETSTAT command to show my
Masqueraded connections but its not working
7.35. ( VPNs ) - I would like to get Microsoft PPTP (GRE tunnels) and/or
IPSEC (Linux SWAN) tunnels running through IP MASQ
7.36. ( Games ) - I want to get the XYZ network game to work through IP
MASQ but it won't work. Help!
7.37. ( Stops working ) - IP MASQ works fine for a while but then it
stops working. A reboot seems to fix this. Why?
7.38. ( SMTP Relay ) - Internal MASQed computers cannot send SMTP or
POP-3 mail!
7.39. ( Source Routing ) - I need different internal MASQed networks to
exit on different external IP addresses
7.40. ( IPCHAINS rulesets on 2.4.x kernels ) - What the ipchains.o module
can do on 2.4.x kernels
7.41. ( IPTABLES vs. IPCHAINS vs. IPFWADM ) - Why do the 2.4.x, 2.2.x,
and 2.0.x kernels use different firewall systems?
7.42. ( Upgrades ) - I've just upgraded to the x.y.z kernel, why isn't IP
Masquerade working?
7.43. ( EQL ) - I need help with EQL connections and IP Masq
7.44. ( Wussing out ) - I can't get IP Masquerade to work! What options
do I have for Windows Platforms?
7.45. ( Developers ) - I want to help with IP Masquerade development.
What can I do?
7.46. ( More INFO ) - Where can I find more information on IP Masquerade?
7.47. ( Translators ) - I want to translate this HOWTO to another
language, what should I do?
7.48. ( Updates ) - This HOWTO seems out of date, are you still
maintaining it? Can you include more information on ...? Are there
any plans for making this better?
7.49. ( Thanks ) - I got IP Masquerade working, it's great! I want to
thank you guys, what can I do?


8. Miscellaneous
8.1. Useful Resources
8.2. Linux IP Masquerade Resource
8.3. Thanks to the following supporters..
8.4. Reference
8.5. ChangeLOG



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Chapter 1. Introduction

1.1. Introduction to IP Masquerading or IP MASQ

This document describes how to enable the Linux IP Masquerade feature on a
given Linux host. IP Masquerade, called "IPMASQ" or "MASQ" for short, is a
form of Network Address Translation (NAT) which allows internally connected
computers that do not have one or more registered Internet IP addresses to
communicate to the Internet via the Linux server's Internet IP address. Since
IPMASQ is a generic technology, you can connect the Linux server's internal
and external to other computers through LAN technologies like Ethernet,
TokenRing, and FDDI, as well as dialup connections line PPP or SLIP links.
This document primarily uses Ethernet and PPP connections in examples because
it is most commonly used with DSL / Cablemodems and dialup connections.

"This document is intended for systems running stable Linux kernels like
2.4.x, 2.2.x, and 2.0.x preferably on an IBM-compatible PC. IP Masquerade
does work on other Linux-supported platforms like Sparc, Alpha, PowerPC, etc.
but this HOWTO doesn't cover them in as much detail. Beta kernels such as
2.5.x, 2.3.x, 2.1.x, and ANY kernels less than 2.0.x are NOT covered in this
document. The primary reason for this is because many of the older kernels
are considered broken. If you are using an older kernel version, it is highly
advisable to upgrade to one of the stable Linux kernels before using IP
Masquerading. "
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1.2. Foreword, Feedback & Credits

From the original IPMASQ HOWTO author:

"As a new user, I found it very confusing to setup IP masquerade on the Linux
kernel, (back then, its was a 1.2.x kernel). Although there was a FAQ and a
mailing list, there was no documentation dedicated to this. There was also
some requests on the mailing list for a HOWTO manual. So, I decided to write
this HOWTO as a starting point for new users and possibly create a building
block for other knowledgeable users. If you, the reader, have any additional
ideas, corrections, or questions about this document, please feel free to
contact us. "

This document was originally written by [mailto:ambrose@writeme.com] Ambrose
Au back in August, 1996, based on the 1.x kernel IPMASQ FAQ written by Ken
Eves and numerous helpful messages from the original IP Masquerade mailing
list. In particular, a mailing list message from Matthew Driver inspired
Ambrose to set up IP Masquerade and eventually write version 0.80 of this
HOWTO. In April 1997, Ambrose created the Linux IP Masquerade Resource Web
site at [http://ipmasq.webhop.net] http://ipmasq.webhop.net which has
provided up-to-date information on Linux IP Masquerading ever since. In
February 1999, [dranch@trinnet.net] David Ranch took over maintenance of the
HOWTO. David then re-wrote the HOWTO and added a substantial number of
sections to the document. Today, the HOWTO is still maintained by David where
he constantly updates it and fixes any reported bugs, etc.

Please feel free to send any feedback or comments regarding this HOWTO to
[mailto:dranch@trinnet.net] dranch@trinnet.net if you have any corrections or
if any information/URLs/etc. is missing. Your invaluable feedback will
certainly influence the future of this HOWTO!

This HOWTO is meant to be a fairly comprehensive guide to getting your Linux
IP Masquerading system working in the shortest time possible. David only
plays a technical writer on T.V. so you might find the information in this
document not as general and/or objective as it could be. If you think a
section could be clearer, etc.. please let David know. The latest version of
the MASQ HOWTO can be found at [http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/
index-linux.html#ipmasq] Dranch's Linux Page. Additional news, mirrors of the
HOWTO, and information regarding IPMASQ can be found at the [http://
ipmasq.webhop.net/] IP Masquerade Resource web page. If you have any
technical questions on IP Masquerade, please join the [http://
home.indyramp.net/mailman/listinfo/masq] IP Masquerade Mailing List instead
of sending email to David or Ambrose. Most MASQ problems are -common- for ALL
MASQ users and can be easily solved by users on the list. In addition to
this, the response time of the IP MASQ email list will be much faster than a
reply from either David or Ambrose.

The latest version of this document can be found at the following sites which
also contains HTML, Postscript, PDF, etc. versions

* [http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/index-linux.html#ipmasq]
Dranch's Linux page

* http://ipmasq.webhop.net/: The IP Masquerade Resources

* http://ipmasq2.webhop.net/: The IP Masquerade Resources MIRROR

* [http://www.tldp.org] The Linux Documentation Project

* Also refer to IP Masquerade Resource Mirror Sites Listing for other local
mirrored sites.


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1.3. Copyright & Disclaimer

This document is copyrighted(c) 2003,2002,2001,2000 for David A. Ranch and it
is a FREE document. You may redistribute it under the terms of the GNU
General Public License (GPL).

The information herein this document is, to the best of David's knowledge,
correct. However, the Linux IP Masquerade feature is written by humans and
thus, the chance of mistakes, bugs, etc. might occur from time to time.

No person, group, or other body is responsible for any damage on your
computer(s) and any other losses by using the information on this document.
i.e.

"THE AUTHORS AND ALL MAINTAINERS ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY DAMAGES INCURRED
DUE TO ACTIONS TAKEN BASED ON THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT. "

Ok, with all this behind us... On with the show..
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Chapter 2. Background Knowledge

2.1. What is IP Masquerade?

IP Masquerade is a networking function in Linux similar to the one-to-many
(1:Many) NAT (Network Address Translation) servers found in many commercial
firewalls and network routers. For example, if a Linux host is connected to
the Internet via PPP, Ethernet, etc., the IP Masquerade feature allows other
"internal" computers connected to this Linux box (via PPP, Ethernet, etc.) to
also reach the Internet as well. Linux IP Masquerading allows for this
functionality even though these internal machines don't have an officially
assigned IP address.

MASQ allows a set of machines to invisibly access the Internet via the MASQ
gateway. To other machines on the Internet, the outgoing traffic will appear
to be from the IP MASQ Linux server itself. In addition to the added
functionality, IP Masquerade provides the foundation to create a HEAVILY
secured networking environment. With a well built firewall, breaking the
security of a well configured masquerading system and internal LAN should be
considerably difficult to accomplish.

If you would like to know more on how MASQ (1:Many) differs from 1:1 (true)
NAT and Proxy solutions, please see the Section 7.6 FAQ entry.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

2.2. Current Status

IP Masquerade has been in the Linux kernels for several years now and is
quite mature as the kernel enters the 2.4.x stage. Kernels since Linux 1.3.x
have had MASQ support built-in. Today, many individuals and commercial
businesses are using it with excellent results.

2.4.x kernel users:

* The 2.4.x kernel hosts an entirely re-written set of NAT code which is
both far superior, faster, and more secure than any previous versions
written for Linux. Unfortunately, several kernel modules that were
written for the 2.2.x kernel to support things like UDP-based RealAudio,
etc. have not been ported to 2.4.x yet. Because of this, some people
should consider NOT upgrading if these network applications are critical
to them. But, at the same time, some of these programs have been updated
and now use different, NAT-friendly protocols. Thus special NAT treatment
is no longer required. As always, please see the http://ipmasq.webhop.net
/: The IP Masquerade Resources site for updated news, etc.


Common network functionalities like Web browsing, telnet, ssh, ping,
traceroute, etc. work well over stock IP Masquerade setups. Other network
applications such as ftp, irc, and Real Audio work well with the appropriate
additional IP MASQ modules loaded into the kernel as modules. Other
network-specific programs like streaming audio (MP3s, True Speech, etc)
should work too without any special module. Some users on the mailing list
also had good results with video conferencing software.

It should be noted that running IP Masquerade with only ONE network card
(NIC) to MASQ between internal and external Ethernet networks is NOT
recommended. For more details, please see Section 7.28 FAQ section.

Anyways, please refer to Section 6.3 for a more complete listing of software
supported by IP Maquerade all kernel versions.

IP Masquerade works well as a server to other 'client machines' running
various operating systems and hardware platforms. Here is a sampling of
successful reports with internal MASQed systems running :



* UNIX: Sun Solaris, [Net,Free,Open,*i]-BSD, Hp-UX, Linux, IBM AIX, Digital
UNIX, Ultrix, etc.

* Microsoft Windows 2000, NT (3.x and 4.x), 95/98/ME, Windows for
Workgroups (with the TCP/IP package)

* IBM OS/2

* Apple Macintosh MacOS machines running either MacTCP or Open Transport

* DOS-based systems with packet drivers and the NCSA Telnet package

* VAXen

* Compaq/Digital Alpha running Linux and NT

* Amiga computers with AmiTCP or AS225-stack.




The list goes on and on but the point is, if your OS platform talks TCP/IP,
it should work with Linux's IP Masquerade!
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2.3. Who Can Benefit From IP Masquerade?



* If you have a Linux host connected to the Internet and..

* if you have internal computers running TCP/IP connected that are
connected to this Linux box via on a network, and/or

* if your Linux host has more than one modem and acts as a PPP or SLIP
server connected to other computers, and these machines do not have
official or public assigned IP addresses (i.e. addressed with private TCP
/IP numbers).

* If you want those OTHER machines to communicate to the Internet without
spending extra money to acquire additional Public / Official TCP/IP
addresses from your ISP, then you should either configure Linux to be a
router or purchase an external router.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

2.4. Who Doesn't Need IP Masquerade?



* If your machine is a stand-alone Linux host connected to the Internet
(setting up a firewall is a good idea though), or

* if you already have multiple assigned public addresses for your OTHER
machines, and

* if you don't like the idea of a 'free ride' using Linux and feel more
comfortable using expensive commercial tools to perform the exact same
functionalities.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

2.5. How does IP Masquerade Work?

Based from the original IP Masquerade FAQ by Ken Eves: Here is a drawing of
the most simplistic setup:
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|PPP/ETH/etc. +------------+ +-------------+ |
|to ISP provider | Linux #1 | PPP/ETH/etc. | Anybox | |
| | | | | |
| <---------- modem1| |modem2 ----------- modem3| | |
| | | | | |
| 111.222.121.212 | | 192.168.0.100 | | |
| +------------+ +-------------+ |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

In the above drawing, a Linux box with IP_MASQUERADING is installed as Linux
#1 and is connected to the Internet via PPP, Ethernet, etc. It has an
assigned public IP address of 111.222.121.212. It also has another network
interface (e.g. modem2) connected to allow incoming network traffic be it
from a PPP connection, Ethernet connection, etc.

The second system (which does not need to be Linux) connects into the Linux #
1 box and starts its network traffic to the Internet. This second machine
does NOT have a publicly assigned IP address from the Internet, so it uses an
[http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1918.txt?number=1918] RFC1918 private address,
say 192.168.0.100. (see below for more info)

With IP Masquerade and the routing configured properly, this second machine
"Anybox" can interact with the Internet as if it was directly connected to
the Internet with a few small exceptions [noted later].

Quoting Pauline Middelink (the founder of Linux's IPMASQ):

"Do not forget to mention that the "ANYBOX" machine should have the Linux #1
box configured as its default gateway (whether it be the default route or
just a subnet is no matter). If the "ANYBOX" machine is connected via a PPP
or SLIP connection, the Linux #1 machine should be configured to support
proxy arp for all routed addresses. But, the setup and configuration of proxy
arp is beyond the scope of this document. Please see the [http://www.tldp.org
/HOWTO/PPP-HOWTO/index.html] PPP-HOWTO for more details."

The following is an excerpt on how IPMASQ briefly works though this will be
explained in more detail later. This short text is based from a previous post
on comp.os.linux.networking which has been edited to match the names used in
the above example:
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| o I tell machine ANYBOX that my PPP or Ethernet connected Linux box is its |
| gateway. |
| |
| o When a packet comes into the Linux box from ANYBOX, it will assign the |
| packet to a new TCP/IP source port number and insert its own IP address |
| inside the packet header, saving the originals. The MASQ server will |
| then send the modified packet over the PPP/ETH interface onto the |
| Internet. |
| |
| o When a packet returns from the Internet into the Linux box, Linux |
| examines if the port number is one of those ports that was assigned |
| above. If so, the MASQ server will then take the original port and |
| IP address, put them back in the returned packet header, and send |
| the packet to ANYBOX. |
| |
| o The host that sent the packet will never know the difference. |
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Another IP Masquerading Example:

A typical example is given in the diagram below:
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Ethernet |
| 192.168.0.x |
| +----------+ |
| | | |
| | A-box |:::::: |
| | |.2 : |
| +----------+ : |
| : +----------+ PPP/ETH |
| +----------+ : .1 | Linux | link |
| | | :::::::| Masq-Gate|:::::::::::::::::::>> Internet |
| | B-box |:::::: | | 111.222.121.212 |
| | |.3 : +----------+ |
| +----------+ : |
| : |
| +----------+ : |
| | | : |
| | C-box |:::::: |
| | |.4 |
| +----------+ |
| |
| |
| | | | > |
| | <-Internal Network--> | | <- External Network ----> > |
| | connected via an | | Connected from the > |
| | Ethernet hub or | | Linux server to your > |
| | switch | | Internet connection > |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

In this example, there are (4) computer systems that we are concerned about.
There is also presumably something on the far right that your PPP/ETH
connection to the Internet comes through (modem server, DSL DSLAM, Cablemodem
router, etc.). Out on the Internet, there exists some remote host (very far
off to the right of the page) that you are interested in communicating with).
The Linux system named Masq-Gate is the IP Masquerading gateway for ALL
internal networked machines. In this example, the machines A-box, B-box, and
C-box would have to go through the Masq-Gate to reach the Internet. The
internal network uses one of several [http://www.cis.ohio-state.edu/cgi-bin/
rfc/rfc1918.html] RFC-1918 assigned private network addresses, where in this
case, would be the Class-C network 192.168.0.0. If you aren't familiar with
RFC1918, it is encouraged to read the first few chapters of the RFC but the
jist of it is that the TCP/IP addresses 10.0.0.0/8, 172.16-31.0.0/12, and
192.168.0.0/16 are reserved. When we say "reserved", we mean that anyone can
use these addresses as long as they aren't routed over the Internet. ISPs are
even allowed to use this private addressing space as long as they keep these
addresses within their own networks and NOT advertise them to other ISPs.
Unfortunately, this isn't always the case but thats beyond the scope of this
HOWTO.

Anyway, the Linux box in the diagram above has the TCP/IP address 192.168.0.1
while the other systems has the addresses:



* A-Box: 192.168.0.2

* B-Box: 192.168.0.3

* C-Box: 192.168.0.4




The three machines, A-box, B-box and C-box, can have any one of several
operating systems, just as long as they can speak TCP/IP. Some such as
Windows 95, Macintosh MacTCP or OpenTransport , or even another Linux box
have the ability to connect to other machines on the Internet. When running
the IP Masquerade, the masquerading system or MASQ-gate converts all of these
internal connections so that they appear to originate from the masq-gate
itself. MASQ then arranges so that the data coming back to a masqueraded
connection is relayed to the proper originating system. Therefore, the
systems on the internal network are only able to see a direct route to the
internet and are unaware that their data is being masqueraded. This is called
a "Transparent" connection.

NOTE: Please see Chapter 7 for more details on topics such as:



* The differences between NAT, MASQ, and Proxy servers.

* How packet firewalls work



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

2.6. Requirements for IP Masquerade on Linux 2.4.x

" ** Please refer to IP Masquerade Resource for the latest information. ** "

* The newest 2.4.x kernels are now using both a completely new TCP/IP
network stack as well as a new NAT sub-system called NetFilter. Within
this NetFilter suite of tools, we now have a tool called IPTABLES for the
2.4.x kernels much like there was IPCHAINS for the 2.2.x kernels and
IPFWADM for the 2.0.x kernels. The new IPTABLES system is far more
powerful (combines several functions into one place like true NAT
functionality), offers better security (stateful inspection), and better
performance with the new 2.4.x TCP/IP stack. But this new suite of tools
can be a bit complicated in comparison to older generation kernels.
Hopefully, if you follow along with this HOWTO carefully, setting up
IPMASQ won't be too bad. If you find anything unclear, downright wrong,
etc. please email David about it.

Unlike the migration to IPCHAINS from IPFWADM, the new NetFilter tool has
kernel modules that can actually support older IPCHAINS and IPFWADM
rulesets with minimal changes. So re-writing your old MASQ or firewall
ruleset scripts is not longer required. BUT.. with the 2.4.x kernels, you
cannot use the old 2.2.x MASQ modules like ip_masq_ftp, ip_masq_irc, etc.
AND IPCHAINS is incompatible with the new IPTABLES modules like
ip_conntrack_ftp, etc. So, what does this mean? It basically means that
if you want to use IPMASQ or PORTFW functionality under a 2.4.x kernel,
you shouldn't use IPCHAINS rules but IPTABLES ones instead. Please also
keep in mind that there might be several benefits in performing a full
ruleset re-write to take advantage of the newer IPTABLES features like
stateful tracking, etc. but that is dependant upon how much time you have
to migrate your old rulesets. Please see Section 7.40 for additional
details.


Some new 2.4.x functionalities include the following:

PROs:

* Lots of new protocols modules like: amanda, eggdrop, ipsec, ipv6,
portscan, pptp, quota, rsh, talk, and tftp

* TRUE 1:1 NAT functionality for those who have TCP/IP addresses and
subnets to use (no more iproute2 commands)

* Stateful application level (FTP, IRC, etc.) and stateful protocol level
(TCP/UDP/ICMP) network traffic inspection

* Built-in PORT Forwarding (no more ipmasqadm or ipportfw commands)

* The built-in PORTFW'ing support works for both external and internal
traffic. This means that users that have PORTFW for external traffic and
REDIR for internal port redirection do not need to use two tools any
more!

* PORT Forwarding of FTP traffic to internal hosts is now completely
supported and is handled in the conn_trak_ftp module

* Full Policy-Based routing features (source-based TCP/IP address routing)

* Compatibility with Linux's FastRoute feature for significantly faster
packet forwarding (a.k.a Linux network switching).

Note that this feature is still not compatible with packet filtering for
strong firewall rulesets.

* Fully supports TCP/IP v4, v6, and even DECnet (ack!)

* Supports wildcard interface names like "ppp*" for serial interfaces like
ppp0, ppp1, etc

* Supports filtering on both input and output INTERFACES (not just IP
addresses)

* Source Ethernet MAC filtering

* Denial of Service (DoS) packet rate limiting

* Packet REJECTs now have user-selectable return ICMP messages

* Variable levels of logging (different packets can go to different SYSLOG
levels)

* Other features like traffic mirroring, securing traffic per login, etc.




CONs:

* Netfilter is an entirely new architechure thus most of the older 2.2.x
MASQ kernel modules written to make non-NAT friendly network applications
work through IPMASQ need to be re-written for the 2.4.x kernels. Because
of this, if you specifically need functionality from some of these
modules (see below), you should stay with a 2.2.x kernel until these
modules have been either ported or the application has been updated to
use NAT-friendly protocols. If you are curious on the porting status of a
given module, please email the author of the module and NOT David or
Ambrose. We don't code.. we just document. :-)

Here is the status of the known IP Masq kernel modules or patches as
found on the IPMASQ WWW site's Application Support Matrix. In addition,
you should also setup out the [http://www.netfilter.org/documentation/
pomlist/pom-summary.html] Netfilter Patch-o-Matic URL as well. If you
have the time and knowledge to help in the porting of code, your efforts
would be highly appreciated:
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Status = Module name = Description and notes |
|--------- ----------- ---------------------------------- |
| Ported CuSeeme Used for Video conferencing |
| |
|NotPorted DirectPlay Used for online Microsoft-based games |
| |
| Ported FTP Used for file transfers |
| - NOTEs: Built into the kernel and |
| fully supports PORTFWed FTP |
| |
|ReWritten H.323 Used for Video conferencing |
| |
|NotPorted ICQ Used for Instant messaging |
| * No longer required for modern ICQ clients |
| |
| Ported Irc Used for Online chat rooms |
| |
| Ported Quake Used for online Quake games |
| |
| Ported PPTP Allow for multiple clients to the same server |
| |
|NotPorted Real Audio Used for Streaming video / audio |
| * No longer required for modern RealVideo clients |
| |
|NotPorted VDO Live Used for Streaming audio? |
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Documentation on how to perform MASQ module porting is available at
[http://www.netfilter.org/documentation/HOWTO/
netfilter-hacking-HOWTO.html] http://www.netfilter.org/documentation/
HOWTO/netfilter-hacking-HOWTO.html. If you have the time and knowledge,
your talent would highly be appreciated in porting these modules.


If you'd like to read up more on NetFilter and IPTables, please see: [http://
www.netfilter.org/documentation/index.html#HOWTO] http://www.netfilter.org/
documentation/index.html#HOWTO and more specifically [http://
www.netfilter.org/documentation/HOWTO//NAT-HOWTO.html] http://
www.netfilter.org/documentation/HOWTO//NAT-HOWTO.html

Linux 2.4.x IP Masquerade requirements include:

* Any decent computer hardware. See Section 7.2 for more details.

* The 2.4.x kernel source is available from [http://www.kernel.org/] http:/
/www.kernel.org/.

NOTE: Most modern Linux distributions, Section 7.1, that natively come
with 2.4.x kernels are typically modular kernels and have all the IP
Masquerade functionality already included. In such cases, there is no
need to compile a new Linux kernel. If you are UPGRADING your kernel, you
should be aware of other programs that might be required and/or need to
be upgraded as well (mentioned later in this HOWTO).

* The program "iptables" version 1.2.4 or newer ( 1.2.7a or newer is highly
recommended ) archive available from [http://www.netfilter.org/] http://
www.netfilter.org/

+ NOTE #1: All versions of IPTABLES less than 1.2.3 have a FTP module
issue that can bypass any existing firewall rulesets. ALL IPTABLES
users are highly recommended to upgrade to the newest version. The
URL is above.

NOTE #2: All versions of IPTABLES less than 1.2.2 have a FTP "port"
security vulnerability in the ip_conntrack_ftp module. All IPTABLES
users are highly recommended to upgrade to the newest version. The
URL is above.

+ This tool, much like the older IPCHAINS and IPFWADM tools enables the
various Masquerding code, more advanced forms of NAT, packet
filtering, etc. It also makes use of additional MASQ modules like the
FTP and IRC modules. Additional information on version requirements
for the newest IPTABLES howto, etc. is located at the [http://
www.netfilter.org/] Unreliable IPTABLES HOWTOs page.


* Loadable kernel modules, preferably 2.1.121 or higher, are available from
[http://home.pi.se/blox/modutils/index.html] http://home.pi.se/blox/
modutils/index.html or [ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/utils/kernel/
modutils ] ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/utils/kernel/modutils

* A properly configured and running TCP/IP network running on the Linux
machine as covered in [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Net-HOWTO/index.html]
Linux NET HOWTO and the [http://www.tldp.org/LDP/nag2/index.html] Network
Administrator's Guide . Also check out the [http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/
~dranch/LINUX/index-linux.html#TrinityOS] TrinityOS document which is
also authored by David Ranch. TrinityOS is a very comprehensive guide for
Linux networking. Some topics include IP MASQ, security, DNS, DHCP,
Sendmail, PPP, Diald, NFS, IPSEC-based VPNs, and performance sections, to
name a few. There are over Fifty sections in all!

* Connectivity to the Internet for your Linux host covered in Linux ISP
Hookup HOWTO, [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/PPP-HOWTO/index.html] Linux PPP
HOWTO, and [http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/index-linux.html#
TrinityOS] TrinityOS. Other helpful HOWTOs could include: Linux DHCP
mini-HOWTO, [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Cable-Modem/index.html] Linux
Cable Modem mini-HOWTO and [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/DSL-HOWTO/
index.html] http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/DSL-HOWTO/index.html

* Know how to configure, compile, and install a new Linux kernel as
described in the Linux Kernel HOWTO. This HOWTO does cover kernel
compiling but only for IP Masquerade related options.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
2.7. Requirements for IP Masquerade on Linux 2.2.x

" ** Please refer to IP Masquerade Resource for the latest information. ** "



* Any decent computer hardware. See Section 7.2 for more details.

* The 2.2.x kernel source is available from [http://www.kernel.org/] http:/
/www.kernel.org/.

NOTE: Most modern Linux distributions, Section 7.1, that natively come
with 2.2.x kernels are typically modular kernels and have all the IP
Masquerade functionality already included. In such cases, there is no
need to compile a new Linux kernel. If you are UPGRADING your kernel, you
should be aware of other programs that might be required and/or need to
be upgraded as well (mentioned later in this HOWTO).

+ NOTE #1: --- UPDATE YOUR KERNEL --- Linux 2.2.x kernels less than
version 2.2.20 contain several different security vulnerabilities
(some were MASQ specific). Kernels less than 2.2.20 have a few local
vulnerabilities. Kernel versions less than 2.2.16 have a TCP root
exploit vulnerability and versions less than 2.2.11 have a IPCHAINS
fragmentation bug. Because of these issues, users running a firewall
with strong IPCHAINS rulesets are open to possible instrusion. Please
upgrade your kernel to a fixed version.


* NOTE #2: Some newer Section 7.1 such as Redhat 5.2 might not be Linux
2.2.x ready (upgradable). Tools like DHCP, NetUtils, etc. will need to be
upgraded. More details can be found later in the HOWTO.

* Loadable kernel modules, preferably 2.1.121 or higher, are available from
[http://home.pi.se/blox/modutils/index.html] http://home.pi.se/blox/
modutils/index.html or [ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/utils/kernel/
modutils ] ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/utils/kernel/modutils

* A properly configured and running TCP/IP network running on the Linux
machine as covered in [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Net-HOWTO/index.html]
Linux NET HOWTO and the [http://www.tldp.org/LDP/nag2/index.html] Network
Administrator's Guide . Also check out the [http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/
~dranch/LINUX/index-linux.html#TrinityOS] TrinityOS document which is
also authored by David Ranch. TrinityOS is a very comprehensive guide for
Linux networking. Some topics include IP MASQ, security, DNS, DHCP,
Sendmail, PPP, Diald, NFS, IPSEC-based VPNs, and performance sections, to
name a few. There are over Fifty sections in all!

* Connectivity to the Internet for your Linux host covered in Linux ISP
Hookup HOWTO, [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/PPP-HOWTO/index.html] Linux PPP
HOWTO, and [http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/index-linux.html#
TrinityOS] TrinityOS. Other helpful HOWTOs could include: Linux DHCP
mini-HOWTO, [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Cable-Modem/index.html] Linux
Cable Modem mini-HOWTO and [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/DSL-HOWTO/
index.html] http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/DSL-HOWTO/index.html

* IP Chains 1.3.10 or newer are available from [http://www.netfilter.org/
ipchains/] http://www.netfilter.org/ipchains/. Additional information on
version requirements for the newest IPCHAINS HOWTO, etc is located at the
Linux IP Chains page (mirror at Samba.org)

* Know how to configure, compile, and install a new Linux kernel as
described in the Linux Kernel HOWTO. This HOWTO does cover kernel
compiling but only for IP Masquerade related options.


Other optional patches and tools for 2.2.x kernels

* TCP/IP port-forwarding or re-directing:

+ IP PortForwarding (IPMASQADM) - RECOMMENDED - mirror


* PORTFW FTP Solutions:

+ There are 2.2.x and 2.0.x kernel MASQ Module solutions for PORTFWed
FTP to a MASQed machine (put an FTP server behind a MASQ server).
Please see the Application Page on the [http://ipmasq.webhop.net]
IPMASQ WWW site for full details. Please note that this is not
required for 2.4.x kernels.

There is a full FTP proxy application from SuSe that will also allow
PORTFWed-like functionality to reach an internal FTP server. For more
details, please refer to the SuSe Proxy URL.


* IPROUTE2 for True 1:1 NAT, Policy-based (source) routing, and Traffic
Shaping:

+ ftp://ftp.inr.ac.ru/ip-routing

+ Documentation can be found at [http://www.compendium.com.ar/
policy-routing.txt] http://www.compendium.com.ar/policy-routing.txt

+ The [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Adv-Routing-HOWTO/index.html] Advanced
Routing HOWTO

+ Some source code mirrors are at:

[ftp://ftp.funet.fi/pub/mirrors/ftp.inr.ac.ru/ip-routing/] ftp://
ftp.funet.fi/pub/mirrors/ftp.inr.ac.ru/ip-routing/ (STM1 to USA) ---
[ftp://sunsite.icm.edu.pl/pub/Linux/iproute/] ftp://
sunsite.icm.edu.pl/pub/Linux/iproute/

[ftp://ftp.sunet.se/pub/Linux/ip-routing/] ftp://ftp.sunet.se/pub/
Linux/ip-routing/ --- [ftp://ftp.nvg.ntnu.no/pub/linux/ip-routing/]
ftp://ftp.nvg.ntnu.no/pub/linux/ip-routing/

[ftp://ftp.crc.ca/pub/systems/linux/ip-routing/] ftp://ftp.crc.ca/pub
/systems/linux/ip-routing/ --- [ftp://ftp.paname.org] ftp://
ftp.paname.org (France)



Please see the [http://ipmasq.webhop.net/] IP Masquerade Resource page for
more information available on these patches and possibly others as well.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

2.8. Requirements for IP Masquerade on Linux 2.0.x

" ** Please refer to IP Masquerade Resource for the latest information. ** "

* Any decent computer hardware. See Section 7.2 for more details.

* The 2.0.x kernel source is available from [http://www.kernel.org/] http:/
/www.kernel.org/.

NOTE: Most modern Linux Section 7.1 that natively come with 2.0.x kernels
are typically modular kernels and have all the IP Masquerade
functionality already included. In such cases, there is no need to
compile a new Linux kernel. If you are UPGRADING your kernel, you should
be aware of other programs that might be required and/or need to be
upgraded as well (mentioned later in this HOWTO).

* Loadable kernel modules, preferably 2.1.85 or newer is available from
[http://home.pi.se/blox/modutils/index.html] http://home.pi.se/blox/
modutils/index.html or [ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/utils/kernel/
modutils ] ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/linux/utils/kernel/modutils
(modules-1.3.57 is the minimal requirement)

* A properly configured and running TCP/IP network running on the Linux
machine as covered in Linux NET HOWTO and the [http://www.tldp.org/LDP/
nag2/index.html] Network Administrator's GuideAlso check out the [http://
www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/index-linux.html#TrinityOS] TrinityOS
document which is also authored by David Ranch. TrinityOS is a very
comprehensive guide to Linux networking. Topics include IP MASQ,
security, DNS, DHCP, Sendmail, PPP, Diald, NFS, IPSEC-based VPNs,
performance issues, and many more. There exists over fifty sections in
all!

* Connectivity to the Internet for your Linux host is covered in Linux ISP
Hookup HOWTO, [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/PPP-HOWTO/index.html] Linux PPP
HOWTO, and [http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/index-linux.html#
TrinityOS] TrinityOS. Other helpful HOWTOs could include: Linux DHCP
mini-HOWTO, [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Cable-Modem/index.html] Linux
Cable Modem mini-HOWTO and [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/DSL-HOWTO/
index.html] Linux DSL HOWTO

* Ipfwadm 2.3.0 or newer is available from [http://www.xos.nl/linux/ipfwadm
/download.html] http://www.xos.nl/linux/ipfwadm/download.html

* More information on version requirements are on the [http://www.xos.nl/
linux/ipfwadm/] Linux IPFWADM page

* If you are interested in running IPCHAINS on a 2.0.x+ kernel, see Willy
Tarreau's IPCHAINS enabler for 2.0.36+ or Rusty's IPCHAINS for 2.0.x
kernels. Please note that these patches are NOT compatible with the
IPPORTFW patches for the 2.0.x kernels. Unfortunately, its an either/or
deal.

* Know how to configure, compile, and install a new Linux kernel as
described in the [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Kernel-HOWTO/index.html]
Linux Kernel HOWTO. This HOWTO does cover kernel compiling but only for
IP Masquerade related options.


Here is a list of IP Masquerading patches for 2.0.x kernels:

* Steven Clarke's IP PortForwarding (IPPORTFW) - RECOMMENDED

* [http://ipmasq.webhop.net/ipautofw.tar.gz] IP AutoForward - NOT
Recommended

* [http://ipmasq.webhop.net/redir_0.7.orig.tar.gz] REDIR for TCP (REDIR) -
NOT Recommended unless required for internal PORTFW

* [http://ipmasq.webhop.net/udpred.c.gz] UDP redirector (UDPRED) - NOT
Recommended

* PORTFWed FTP:

+ If you are going to port forward FTP traffic to an internal FTP
server, you might need to download [http://ipmasq.webhop.net/files22/
ip_masq-v0.27-for_2.2.18pre9.patch.gz] Fred Viles's FTP server patch
The reason for "might" is that some users have had success without
the use of these pathches, while others need it. Explicit details on
this topic can be found in Section 6.7 of this HOWTO.


* X-Windows display forwarders:

+ [ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/pub/Linux/X11/compress/dxpc-3.7.0.tar.gz]
X-windows forwarding (DXCP)


* PPTP (GRE) and SWAN (IPSEC) VPNs tunneling forwarders:

+ If you plan connecting an internal MASQed PC to a remote PPTP server,
you MUST INSTALL the PPTP-Masquerade kernel patch available from the
URLsbelow. If you plan on having external PPTP users connect to an
internal masqueraded PPTP server, not only do you need the kernel
patch installed but you also need PORTFW support enabled in the
kernel. Please see the following URLs for the patches and more
information:

[http://www.impsec.org/linux/masquerade/ip_masq_vpn.html] John
Hardin's VPN Masquerade forwarders or the old patch for just [http://
ipmasq.webhop.net/ip_masq_pptp.patch.gz] PPTP Support.


* Game specific patches:

+ Glenn Lamb's [http://ipmasq.webhop.net/files20/
loose-udp-2.0.36.patch.gz] LooseUDP for 2.0.36+ patch.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chapter 3. Setting Up IP Masquerade

3.1. Compiling a new kernel if needed

If your private network contains any vital information, think carefully in
terms of SECURITY before implementing IP Masquerade. By default, IP MASQ
becomes a GATEWAY for you to get onto the Internet, but it also can allow
someone from the Internet to possibly get into your internal network.

Once you have IP MASQ functioning, it is HIGHLY recommended for the user to
implement a STRONG IPFWADM/IPCHAINS firewall ruleset. Please see Section
6.4.1, Section 6.4.2 and Section 6.4.3 located below for more details.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

3.2. Checking your existing kernel for MASQ functionality

Almost ALL modern Linux distributions come MASQ-Ready these days but its
always good to check your system before you try to set things up. Follow
these few steps for your kernel to see if your kernel is MASQ ready.

To see which kernel your system is running, run the following command:
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|uname -a |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+



* Just for clarity: 2.4.x kernels run IPTABLES :: 2.2.x kernels run
IPCHAINS :: 2.0.x kernels run IPFWADM

* In general, you must have kernel support for:

+ IP forwarding

+ IP masquerading

+ IP Firewalling

+ etc.



You will also need to have most MASQ-related modules compiled (most modular
kernels will already have all you need already done. Then you will NOT need
to re-compile the kernel. If you AREN'T SURE if your Linux distribution is
MASQ ready, do the following:

* 2.4.x kernels (look for most of the following entries out of the much
longer list):

+ Run the command "ls /proc/sys/net/ipv4" while logged into the Linux
box. These items are required and should be present regardless if
your kernel built IPMASQ as modules or statically.

o ip_dynaddr

ip_forward


+ To check if IPMASQ was compiled statically into the kernel, run the
command "/sbin/lsmod" and see if and modules like the ones shown
below for the MODULE section are loaded. No? Ok, now run the command
"ls /proc/net/" and see if you see additional /proc files such as:

o ip_masquerade

ip_conntrack

ip_tables_names

If you see these /proc entries and there WEREN'T any kernel modules
loaded (shown via the "lsmod" command mentioned above), then your
kernel has the IPTABLES subsystem statically compiled into it and is
ready to go to use IPMASQ on this system.
+ If your kernel uses IPTABLES via modules, most of the stuff listed
above should have been missing (because the modules probably aren't
loaded). Run the command "ls /lib/modules/`uname -r`/kernel/net/ipv4/
netfilter/" where you should see files like:

o ip_conntrack.o, ip_conntrack_ftp.o, ip_conntrack_irc.o,
ip_nat_ftp.o, ip_nat_irc.o

ip_tables.o, ipt_MASQUERADE.o, iptable_nat.o, iptable_mangle.o,
iptable_filter.o

And some optional ones like: ipchains.o, ipt_REJECT.o, and
ipt_tcpmss.o

If you see those kernel files, IPTABLES was compiled using modules
and things look ready to go to use IPMASQ on this system.

* 2.2.x kernels (look for most of the following entries out of the much
longer list): list):

+ Run the command "ls /proc/sys/net/ipv4" while logged into the Linux
box. These items are required and should be present regardless if
your kernel built IPMASQ as modules or statically.

o ip_always_defrag

ip_dynaddr

ip_forward

ip_masq_debug

ip_masq_udp_dloose (some distros don't support this -- ignore it
for now

Other 2.2.x options can be checked by running "ls /proc/net/"

# ip_fwchains

ip_fwnames

ip_masquerade


Even more 2.2.x options can be checked by running "ls /proc/net/"

# app

icmp

icq

mfw

portfw

tcp

udp/




* 2.0.x kernels (look for most of the following entries out of the much
longer list):

+ Run the command "ls /proc/sys/net/ipv4" while logged into the Linux
box. These items are required and should be present regardless if
your kernel built IPMASQ as modules or statically.

o ip_dynaddr

ip_forward

running "ls /proc/net"

# ip_forward

ip_masq_app

ip_masquerade

ip_portfw





Ultimately, it comes down to the fact if you see /proc files such as
"iip_forward", "ip_masq_debug", "ip_masq_udp_dloose"(optional), and
"ip_always_defrag" (optional) exist.

So. Do most of the above /proc entries or kernel modules show up for your
respective kernel? If so, thats good! If you cannot find any of the above
entries or if you aren't sure if your distribution supports IP Masquerading
by default, ASSUME IT DOESN'T SUPPORT MASQ. You can do one last check by
looking at the Section 7.1 section and see if your Linux Distribution is
listed. Still not there? Sounds like you'll need to compile a kernel but
don't worry.. it isn't hard.

Regardless if your current kernel has MASQ support or not, reading the
remainder of this section is still highly recommended as it contains other
useful information.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

3.2.1. Compiling Linux 2.4.x Kernels

* First, you'll need to get some 2.4.x kernel sources (preferably the
latest kernel version - NEWER *IS* BETTER IN LINUX LAND)

+ NOTE #1: As both the 2.4.x kernel train and the iptables program
development progresses, the compile configurion options will change
over time. As of this version of the IPMASQ howto, this section
reflects the settings for IPTABLES 1.2.7a and the 2.4.20 kernel. If
you are compiling against a newer or previous kernel or IPTABLES
version, the dialogs and even commands might look different. It is
recommended that you update to the newest versions of both the kernel
and IPTABLES for added capability, performance, and stability of the
kernel.


* Next, depending on the version of the Linux kernel and IPTABLES archive
you downloaded, you might want to apply some IPTABLES "patch-o-matic"
patches against the kernel. These OPTIONAL patches might fix some known
problems, add additional functionality you might need (H.323 protocol,
specific issues with network games), etc. It should be noted that the
Patch-O-Matic patches used to come with the IPTABLES archive. This is no
longer the case and you have to download them (if any) seperately. You
can find the the various URLs for downloading IPTABLES, the Patch-o-matic
system, etc. Section 2.6.

* If this is your first time compiling the kernel, don't be scared. In
fact, it's rather easy and it's covered in several URLs found in Section
2.6. Please note that the instructions included here is just one way to
do build a kernel. Please see the Kernel HOWTO for full details.

NOTE: Please notice that it IS NOT recommended to put the new kernel
sources into the /usr/src/linux directory. You should leave the original
kernel sources that came with your Linux distribution in /usr/src/linux.
For more details on this topic, please read the "README" file in the top
level directory of the kernel sources.

* For this HOWTO example, create a directory called /usr/src/kernel. Next,
"cd" into this directory and download the newest 2.4.x kernel sources
into it. Once downloaded, issue the following command (if the file ends
in a .tar.gz): tar xvzf linux-2.4.x.tar.gz or (if the file ends in a
.tar.bzip2): tar xyvf linux-2.4.x.tar.bz2. Please substitute the "x" in
the 2.4.x filename with the Linux 2.4 kernel version you downloaded.

BZ2 Note: Some Linux distributions use the "I" option instead of the "y"
option to decompress bzip2 archives.

Once uncompressed, I recommend that you rename the directory from the
stock "linux" name to "linux-2.4.x" (replace the "x" with the specific
version of your newly installed kernel) for clarity. To do this, run the
command "mv linux linux-2.4.x". Next, make sure there is a directory or
symbolic link pointing to "/usr/src/kernel/linux" ie. run the command:
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|ln -s /usr/src/kernel/linux-2.4.x /usr/src/kernel/linux |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
again subsituting the "x" for your proper kernel version.

* As mentioned above, you might consider applying any appropriate or
optional patches to the kernel's MASQ code BEFORE you compile the final
kernel. The IP MASQ code found in the stock kernels is already very
useful and does not require any specific patching in order for the system
to work for NAT-friendly network applications. Many of these patches are
only to fix possible known bugs, add new features (some are /very/ cool),
etc. Please refer to Section 2.6 for URLs and the [http://
ipmasq.webhop.net/] IP Masquerade Resources for up-to-date information
and patch URLs.

* Applying IPTABLES and Patch-o-Matic kernel patches

Download the iptables package and optional Patch-O-matics from the
Section 2.6 and put it into a directory, say "/usr/src/archive/
netfilter". Next, go into this new netfilter directory and uncompress the
iptables archive with the command:

+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|tar xyvf iptables-x.y.z.tar.bz2 |
|tar xyvf patch-o-matic-x.tar.bz2 |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

Now, go into the new iptables-x.y.x directory (/usr/src/archive/netfilter
/iptables-x.y.z) and run the command

+---------------------------------------------------------------+
| #For iptables v1.2.7a: |
| make KERNEL_DIR=/usr/src/kernel/linux |
| |
| #For iptables v1.2.4 (when Patch-o-matic was built-in): |
| make pending-patches KERNEL_DIR=/usr/src/kernel/linux |
| |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

NOTE: this assumes that your 2.4.x kernel sources are in the /usr/src/
kernel/linux directory.

NOTE #2: If you append a "/" to the end of the above command line, you
will get an error stating:
+-----------------------------------------------------------------+
|"make: *** [/usr/src/kernel/linux/include/asm/socket.h] Error 1".|
+-----------------------------------------------------------------+
Remove the trailing "/" and try again.

Here is an example of compiling IPTABLES v1.2.7a. Your output might look
different depending on what version you are trying to use.

* +------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|# make KERNEL_DIR=/usr/src/kernel/linux |
| |
|Extensions found: |
| |
|cc -O2 -Wall -Wunused -I/usr/src/kernel/linux/include -Iinclude/ |
|-DIPTABLES_VERSION=\"1.2.7a\" -fPIC -o extensions/libipt_ah_sh.o -c |
|extensions/libipt_ah.c |
|ld -shared -o extensions/libipt_ah.so extensions/libipt_ah_sh.o |
|cc -O2 -Wall -Wunused -I/usr/src/kernel/linux/include -Iinclude/ |
|-DIPTABLES_VERSION=\"1.2.7a\" -fPIC -o extensions/libipt_conntrack_sh.o -c |
|extensions/libipt_conntrack.c |
|ld -shared -o extensions/libipt_conntrack.so extensions/libipt_conntrack_sh.o |
|cc -O2 -Wall -Wunused -I/usr/src/kernel/linux/include -Iinclude/ |
|-DIPTABLES_VERSION=\"1.2.7a\" -fPIC -o extensions/libipt_dscp_sh.o -c |
|extensions/libipt_dscp.c |
|extensions/libipt_dscp_helper.c:69: warning: `dscp_to_name' defined but not |
|used |
|ld -shared -o extensions/libipt_dscp.so extensions/libipt_dscp_sh.o |
|. |
|. |
|. |
|cc -O2 -Wall -Wunused -I/usr/src/kernel/linux/include -Iinclude/ |
|-DIPTABLES_VERSION=\"1.2.7a\" -c -o libipulog/libipulog.o |
|libipulog/libipulog.c |
|ar rv libipulog/libipulog.a libipulog/libipulog.o |
|a - libipulog/libipulog.o |
|rm libiptc/libip6tc.o libiptc/libip4tc.o libipulog/libipulog.o libipq/libipq.o|
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------+

* Ok, hopefully the IPTABLES program compiled up for you. Now, you need to
install it. To do this, directory and run the command

+---------------------------------------------------------------+
| make install KERNEL_DIR=/usr/src/kernel/linux |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

* Here is an example of installing IPTABLES v1.2.7a. Your output might look
different depending on what version you are trying to use.

* +------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|# make install KERNEL_DIR=/usr/src/kernel/linux |
| |
|cp iptables /usr/local/sbin/iptables |
|cp iptables-save /usr/local/sbin/iptables-save |
|cp iptables-restore /usr/local/sbin/iptables-restore |
|cp ip6tables /usr/local/sbin/ip6tables |
|cp extensions/libipt_ah.so /usr/local/lib/iptables/libipt_ah.so |
|cp extensions/libipt_conntrack.so /usr/local/lib/iptables/libipt_conntrack.so |
|cp extensions/libipt_dscp.so /usr/local/lib/iptables/libipt_dscp.so |
|cp extensions/libipt_ecn.so /usr/local/lib/iptables/libipt_ecn.so |
|cp extensions/libipt_esp.so /usr/local/lib/iptables/libipt_esp.so |
|cp extensions/libipt_helper.so /usr/local/lib/iptables/libipt_helper.so |
|. |
|. |
|. |
|cp extensions/libip6t_udp.so /usr/local/lib/iptables/libip6t_udp.so |
|cp extensions/libip6t_LOG.so /usr/local/lib/iptables/libip6t_LOG.so |
|cp extensions/libip6t_MARK.so /usr/local/lib/iptables/libip6t_MARK.so |
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------+


Next, if you are interested in applying a Patch-O-Matic patch set, go into
the patch-o-matic-X directory (/usr/src/archive/netfilter/patch-o-matic-X)
and run the command

* +----------------------------------------------------------------+
| #For Patch-O-Matic later than the release of iptables v1.2.7a: |
| KERNEL_DIR=/usr/src/kernel/linux |
| ./runme pending |
| |
+----------------------------------------------------------------+

NOTE #1: The use of the "pending" batch is the most common for IPMASQ
functionality but there are several others. See below.

NOTE #2: this assumes that your 2.4.x kernel sources are in the /usr/src/
kernel/linux directory.

NOTE #3: If you append a "/" to the end of the command line, you will get
an error stating:
+------------------------------------------------------------------+
|"make: *** [/usr/src/kernel/linux/include/asm/socket.h] Error 1". |
|Remove the trailing "/" and try again. |
+------------------------------------------------------------------+

Here is an example of the Patch-O-Matic prompts you might receive for a
2.4.20 kernel with the "20030107" Patch-O-Matic set. You can also run the
"runme" program in a batch mode to speed things up, add experimental
patches, etc. if you'd like. To better understand your options, simply
run the "./runme" command by itself. Please note that these prompts WILL
CHANGE over time.

* +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|Welcome to Rusty's Patch-o-matic! |
| |
|Each patch is a new feature: many have minimal impact, some do not. |
|Almost every one has bugs, so I don't recommend applying them all! |
|------------------------------------------------------- |
|Already applied: submitted/01_2.4.19 |
| submitted/02_2.4.20 |
| submitted/ipt_ULOG-mac_len-fix |
| submitted/ipt_multiport-invfix |
| pending/01_ip_conntrack_proto_tcp-lockfix |
| pending/02_newnat-udp-helper |
| pending/03_REJECT-fwspotting-phrack60-fix |
| pending/04_ftp-conntrack-msg-fix |
| |
|Testing... 05_ECN-tcpchecksum-littleendian-fix.patch NOT APPLIED (1 rejects out |
|of 1 hunks) |
|The pending/05_ECN-tcpchecksum-littleendian-fix patch: |
| Author: Patrick McHardy |
| Status: Pending for kernel inclusion |
| |
| The 2.4.20 kernel included the new iptables 'ECN' target, enabling a |
|selective |
| ECN disable mechanism. Unfortunately there was a bug in the incremental |
|TCP |
| checksum update, resulting in broken TCP checksums on little endian |
|machines. |
| |
| This patch fixes the Bug. |
| |
|Testing patch pending/05_ECN-tcpchecksum-littleendian-fix.patch... |
| Patch pending/05_ECN-tcpchecksum-littleendian-fix.patch applied cleanly. |
|Applying patch pending/05_ECN-tcpchecksum-littleendian-fix.patch... |
| Patch pending/05_ECN-tcpchecksum-littleendian-fix.patch applied cleanly. |
| |
|Excellent! Kernel is now ready for compilation. |
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+

* If everything patches fine, you should see something like the text

+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|Excellent! Kernel is now ready for compilation. |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

towards the bottom of the screen. Beyond that, you don't have to install
anything at this point. The next step is to compile the new PATCHED
kernel.

* Ok, now the new kernel is ready to be compiled but you should make sure
that you also have the proper matching iptables program on your machine
too (just to make sure). Run the command:

+ +------------------------------------------------------------+
|whereis iptables |
+------------------------------------------------------------+

and make sure its installed on the machine (the default place is in /usr/
local/sbin/iptables. If you cannot find it or patched up your kernel
sources as shown above, I recommend you just re-compile it up as shown
above.

Now that the kernel sources are patched up, you need to configure it to know
what kinds of features you need (HD support, Networking support, MASQ
support, etc.). Here are the MINIMUM kernel configuration options required to
enable IP Masquerade functionality. Please understand that this HOWTO
illustrates just ONE way to configure and compile a kernel (modules vs
static). The main difference from this example vs. an example given by a
different MASQ guide is that some people might wish to compile kernel
components either as modules OR monolithically into the kernel. Basically,
compiling things as modules gives you added flexibility to what is or isn't
installed into the kernel (reduces unneeded memory use for things you aren't
/ won't use and modules also allow for drop-in software upgrades [usually no
need to reboot the machine]). On the flip side, kernel modules add more
complexity to your configuration and sometimes the kernel auto-loader might
make mistakes (not that I've ever seen this happen). Compiling things
directly into the kernel makes things simpler BUT you loose a huge level of
flexibility. The following kernel configuration example is a mixture of both
a selection of kernel modules and building them in monolithically (you
probably will ALWAYS need MASQ functionality ready to go).

* Side Note: It is assumed that you will also configure the kernel to use
your other installed hardware such as USB printers, Ethernet network
interfaces, SCSI and IDE HD controllers, etc. as well. Please refer to
the [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Kernel-HOWTO/index.html] Linux Kernel
HOWTO and the kernel source's "README" file and "Documentation/"
directory for detailed help on compiling a kernel.


You will need to answer either YES, NO, or MODULE to the following program.
Not all options will be available without the proper kernel patches described
later in this HOWTO. This shouldn't be an issue as most 3rd party patches are
only needed for a very select group of users.

Run the following commands to configure your kernel:



* cd /usr/src/kernel/linux

* make menuconfig


Please note the following kernel prompts reflect a 2.4.14 kernel (with some
of the optional Patch-O-Matic additions. Please read the following carefully
for recommendations:

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|[ Code maturity level options ] |
| |
| * Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers (CONFIG_EXPERIMENTAL) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: though not required for IP MASQ, this option allows the kernel to create |
| the MASQ modules and enable the option for port forwarding |
| |
| * Enable loadable module support (CONFIG_MODULES) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: allows you to load kernel IP MASQ modules |
| |
| * Set version information on all module symbols (CONFIG_MODVERSIONS) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: allows newer kernels to load older modules if possible |
| |
| * Kernel module loader (CONFIG_KMOD) [Y/n/?] |
| - OPTIONAL: Recommended : allows the kernel to load various kernel modules as it needs them |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (CPU type, memory, SMP, FPU, specific stuff) |
| |
| |
|[ General setup ] |
| |
| * Networking support (CONFIG_NET) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: Enables the network subsystem |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (specific hardware, PCI, kernel binaries, PCMCIA, etc.) |
| |
| |
| * Sysctl support (CONFIG_SYSCTL) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: Enables the ability to enable disable options such as forwarding, |
| dynamic IPs, etc. via the /proc interface |
| |
| |
|[ Block devices ] |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (kernel binaries, power management, PnP, RAID, etc.) |
| |
| == Don't forget to compile in support for hardware that you might need: |
| == IDE controllers, HDs, CDROMs, etc. |
| |
|[ Networking options ] |
| |
| * Packet socket (CONFIG_PACKET) [Y/m/n/?] |
| - YES: Though this is OPTIONAL, this recommended feature will allow you |
| to use TCPDUMP to debug any problems with IP MASQ |
| |
| * Packet socket: mmapped IO (CONFIG_PACKET_MMAP) [N/y/?] y |
| - YES: Speed up the packet protocol |
| |
| * Kernel/User netlink socket (CONFIG_NETLINK) [Y/n/?] |
| - OPTIONAL: Recommended : this feature will allow the logging of |
| advanced firewall issues such as routing messages, etc |
| |
| * Routing messages (CONFIG_RTNETLINK) [N/y/?] (NEW) y |
| - OPTIONAL: Allows for support of advanced kernel routing messages |
| if you enabled the CONFIG_NETLINK option |
| |
| * Netlink device emulation (CONFIG_NETLINK_DEV) [N/y/m/?] (NEW) |
| - NO: This option does not have anything to do with packet firewall |
| logging |
| |
| * Network packet filtering (replaces ipchains) (CONFIG_NETFILTER) [N/y/?] y |
| - YES: Enable this option to let IPTABLES configure the TCP/IP subsection |
| of the kernel. By enabling this, then you can turn on advanced |
| routing mechanisms like IP Masq, packet filtering, etc. |
| |
| * Network packet filtering debugging (CONFIG_NETFILTER_DEBUG) [N/y/?] (NEW) n |
| - NO: Not required for Masquerading functionality though it may help |
| for troubleshooting. There might be a performance penalty when |
| enabling this. |
| |
| * Socket Filtering (CONFIG_FILTER) [Y/n/?] |
| - OPTIONAL: Recommended : Though this doesn't have anything do with IPMASQ, |
| if you plan on implimenting a DHCP server on the internal network, you WILL |
| need to enable this option. |
| |
| * Unix domain sockets (CONFIG_UNIX) [Y/m/n/?] |
| - YES: This enables the UNIX TCP/IP sockets mechanisms |
| |
| * TCP/IP networking (CONFIG_INET) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: Enables the TCP/IP protocol |
| |
| * IP: multicasting (CONFIG_IP_MULTICAST) [N/y/?] |
| - OPTIONAL: You can enable this if you want to be able to receive |
| Multicast traffic. Please note that your ISP must |
| support Multicast as well for this all to work at all |
| |
| * IP: advanced router (CONFIG_IP_ADVANCED_ROUTER) [Y/n/?] |
| - OPTIONAL: Though there is nothing in this section mandatory for |
| Masquerade, some specific options might be useful |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == ( autoconf, tunneling ) |
| |
| * IP: multicast routing (CONFIG_IP_MROUTE) [N/y/?] n |
| - OPTIONAL: Though not needed for IPMASQ, enabling this feature will |
| let you route multicast traffic through your Linux box. |
| Please note that this requires that your ISP be multicast |
| enabled as well. |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (ARPd) |
| |
| * IP: TCP Explicit Congestion Notification support (CONFIG_INET_ECN) [N/y/?] n |
| - NO: Though enabling this option would be great, there are many Internet |
| sites out there that will block this. Hit the "?" when configuring |
| the kernel to learn more about it but it is recommended to say NO for |
| now. |
| |
| * IP: TCP syncookie support (disabled per default) (CONFIG_SYN_COOKIES) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: Recommended : for basic TCP/IP network security |
| |
| |
|[ Networking options --> IP: Netfilter Configuration ] |
| |
| |
| * Connection tracking (required for masq/NAT) (CONFIG_IP_NF_CONNTRACK) [N/y/m/?] (NEW) m |
| - YES: (Module) This enables the kernel to track various network connections. |
| This option is required for Masquerading support as well as to enable |
| Stateful tracking for various filewall mechanisms. Please note that |
| if you compile this directly into the kernel, you cannot enable |
| the legacy IPCHAINS or IPFWADM compatibility modules. |
| |
| * FTP protocol support (CONFIG_IP_NF_FTP) [M/n/?] (NEW) m |
| - YES: (Module) This enables the proper Masquerading of FTP connections if |
| CONFIG_IP_NF_CONNTRACK was enabled above |
| |
| * IRC protocol support (CONFIG_IP_NF_IRC) [M/n/?] (NEW) m |
| - YES: (Module) This enables the proper Masquerading of IRC connections if |
| CONFIG_IP_NF_CONNTRACK was enabled above |
| |
| * Userspace queueing via NETLINK (EXPERIMENTAL) (CONFIG_IP_NF_QUEUE) [N/y/m/?] (NEW) m |
| - OPTIONAL: Though this is OPTIONAL, this feature will allow IPTABLES to |
| copy specific packets to UserSpace tools for additional checks |
| |
| * IP tables support (required for filtering/masq/NAT) (CONFIG_IP_NF_IPTABLES) [N/y/m/?] (NEW) m |
| - YES: (Module) Enables IPTABLES support |
| |
| * limit match support (CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_LIMIT) [N/y/m/?] (NEW) y |
| - OPTIONAL: (Module) Recommended : Though not required, this option can used to |
| enable rate limiting of both traffic and loggin messages help slow down denial |
| of service (DoS) attacks. |
| |
| * MAC address match support (CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_MAC) [N/y/m/?] (NEW) m |
| - OPTIONAL: Though not required, the option can allow you to |
| filter traffic based upon the SOURCE Ethernet MAC address. |
| |
| * netfilter MARK match support (CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_MARK) [N/y/m/?] (NEW) y |
| - YES: (Module) Recommended : This enables IPTABLES to take action upon marked packets. |
| This mechanism can allow for PORTFW functionality, TOS marking, etc. |
| |
| * Multiple port match support (CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_MULTIPORT) [N/y/m/?] (NEW) y |
| - YES: (Module) Recommended : This enables IPTABLES to accept mutliple SRC/DST port |
| ranges (non-contiguous) instead of one port range per IPTABLES |
| statement. |
| |
| * TOS match support (CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_TOS) [Y/m/n/?] n |
| - OPTIONAL: This allows IPTABLES to match packets based upon their |
| DIFFSERV settings. |
| |
| * LENGTH match support (CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_LENGTH) [N/m/?] (NEW) n |
| - OPTIONAL: This allows IPTABLES to match packets based upon their |
| packet length. |
| |
| * TTL match support (CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_TTL) [N/m/?] (NEW) ? n |
| - OPTIONAL: This allows IPTABLES to match packets based upon their |
| TTL settings. |
| |
| * tcpmss match support (CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_TCPMSS) [N/y/m/?] m |
| - OPTIONAL: (Module) Recommended : This option allows users to examine the MSS value in |
| TCP SYN packets. This is an advanced knob but can be very valuable in |
| troubleshooting MTU problems. |
| |
| * Connection state match support (CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_STATE) [M/n/?] m |
| - YES: (Module) Recommended : This option allows for Stateful tracking of network |
| connections. |
| |
| * Unclean match support (EXPERIMENTAL) (CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_UNCLEAN) [N/y/m/?] y |
| - YES: (Module) Recommended : This option allows for connection tracking on odd packets. |
| It cal also help in the detection of possibly malicious packets. |
| This can be a valuable tool in tracking hostile people on the network. |
| |
| * Owner match support (EXPERIMENTAL) (CONFIG_IP_NF_MATCH_OWNER) [N/y/m/?] n |
| - OPTIONAL: This option allows IPTABLES to match traffic based upon the |
| user login, group, etc. who created the traffic. |
| |
| * Packet filtering (CONFIG_IP_NF_FILTER) [N/y/m/?] ? y |
| - YES: (Module) This option allows for the kernel to be able filter traffic at |
| the INPUT, FORWARDING, and OUTPUT traffic points. |
| |
| * REJECT target support (CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_REJECT) [N/y/m/?] (NEW) y |
| - YES: (Module) With this option, a packet firewall can send an ICMP Reject packet |
| back to the originator when a packet is blocked. |
| |
| * MIRROR target support (EXPERIMENTAL) (CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_MIRROR) [N/y/m/?] (NEW) n |
| - OPTIONAL: This option allows the packet firewall to mirror the exact same |
| network packet back to the originator when it is supposed to be |
| blocked. This is similar to the REJECT option above but it actually |
| sends the original packet back to the originator. i.e. a |
| hostile user could actually portscan themselves. |
| |
| |
| * Full NAT (CONFIG_IP_NF_NAT) [M/n/?] m |
| - YES: (Module) This option enables the future menus to enable Masquerading, |
| PORTFWing, Full (1:1) NAT, etc. |
| |
| |
| * MASQUERADE target support (CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_MASQUERADE) [M/n/?] (NEW) m |
| - YES: (Module) This option specifically enables Masquerade into the |
| kernel |
| |
| * REDIRECT target support (CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_REDIRECT) [N/y/m/?] n |
| - OPTIONAL: Not needed for normal MASQ functionality though people who |
| want to do transparent proxy via Squid will want this. |
| |
| * Basic SNMP-ALG support (EXPERIMENTAL) (CONFIG_IP_NF_NAT_SNMP_BASIC) [N/m/?] n |
| - OPTIONAL: This enables IPTABLES to properly NAT internal SNMP packets so |
| that machines with duplicate addressing ranges can be properly |
| managed. |
| |
| |
| * Packet mangling (CONFIG_IP_NF_MANGLE) [N/y/m/?] y |
| - YES: (Module) This option allows for advanced IPTABLES packet manipulation |
| options. |
| |
| |
| * TOS target support (CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_TOS) [N/y/m/?] (NEW) n |
| - OPTIONAL: Enables the kernel to modify the TOS field in a packet |
| before routing it on |
| |
| * MARK target support (CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_MARK) [N/y/m/?] (NEW) m |
| - OPTIONAL: (Module) Recommended : This enables the kernel to manipulate |
| packets based upon the MARK field. This can be used for PORTFW |
| as well as many other things. |
| |
| * LOG target support (CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_LOG) [N/y/m/?] m |
| - YES: (Module) This allows for the logging of packets before they are accepted, |
| denied, rejected, etc. |
| |
| * TCPMSS target support (CONFIG_IP_NF_TARGET_TCPMSS) [N/y/m/?] ? m |
| - YES: (Module) This option help some people with MTU problems. Typically, |
| most users have to set their Internet connection's MTU to |
| 1500 as well as ALL internal machines to 1500. With this |
| option, this whole MTU issue might be finally solved. |
| |
| * ipchains (2.2-style) support (CONFIG_IP_NF_COMPAT_IPCHAINS) [N/y/m/?] m |
| - OPTIONAL: (Module) Recommended : If you have an existing IPCHAINS ruleset |
| (2.2.x kernels) and enable this option, you can continue to use the |
| IPCHAINS program and the majority of your old ruleset except for the |
| use of any 2.2.x kernel-specific modules. Please note that if this |
| IPCHAINS module is loaded, ALL IPTABLES modules will be non- |
| operational. This is an either/or deal only intended for legacy |
| rulesets. |
| |
| * ipfwadm (2.0-style) support (CONFIG_IP_NF_COMPAT_IPFWADM) [N/y/m/?] n |
| - OPTIONAL: If you have an existing IPFWADM ruleset (2.0.x kernels) and |
| enable this option, you can continue to use the IPFWADM program and |
| the majority of your old ruleset except for the use of any 2.0.x |
| kernel-specific modules. Please note that if this IPFWADM module |
| is loaded, ALL IPTABLES modules will be non operational. This is |
| an either/or deal only intended to support legacy rulesets. |
| |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (IPv6, khttpd, ATM, IPX, AppleTalk, etc.) -- |
| |
| * Fast switching (read help!) (CONFIG_NET_FASTROUTE) [N/y/?] n |
| - NO: This performance optimization is NOT compatible with IP MASQ and/or |
| packet filtering |
| |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (QoS, Telephony, IDE, SCSI, 1394FW, I2O, etc) |
| |
| == Don't forget to compile in support for hardware that you might need: |
| == IDE: HDs, CDROMs, etc. |
| == SCSI: HDs, CDROMs, etc. |
| |
| |
|[ Network device support ] |
| |
| * Network device support (CONFIG_NETDEVICES) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: Enables the Linux Network device sublayer |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (Arcnet) |
| |
| |
| * Dummy net driver support (CONFIG_DUMMY) [M/n/y/?] |
| - YES: Though OPTIONAL, this option can help when debugging problems |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (EQL, etc..) |
| |
| == Don't forget to compile in support for hardware that you might need: |
| == NICs: eth, tr, etc. |
| == MODEMs: ppp (ppp async) and/or slip |
| == WANs: T1, T3, ISDN, etc. |
| == ISDN: for internal ISDN modems |
| |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (Amateur Radio, IrDA, ISDN, USB, etc.) |
| |
| |
|[ Character devices ] |
| |
| == Don't forget to compile in serial port support if you are a modem user |
| == Don't forget to compile in mouse support |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (I2C, Watchdog cards, Ftape, Video for Linux, etc. ) |
| |
| |
|[ File systems ] |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (Quota, ISO9660, NTFS, etc ) |
| |
| * /proc filesystem support (CONFIG_PROC_FS) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: Required to dynamically configure the Linux forwarding |
| and NATing systems |
| |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (Console drivers, Sound, USB, Kernel Hacking) |
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
So go ahead and select "exit" and you should be prompted to save your config.

NOTE: These are just the kernel components you need for IP Masquerade
networking support. You will need to select whatever other options needed for
your specific setup. If you want more information on what each one of these
kernel modules does, please see the FAQ section of this HOWTO for details.

* Now compile the kernel (make dep; make clean; make bzImage; make modules;
make modules_install) , etc. Again, it is beyond the scope of this HOWTO
if you have problems compiling your kernel. Please see Section 2.6 for
URLs to the KERNEL howto, etc.

* You will then have move over the kernel binary, update your bootloader
(LILO, Grub, etc.), and reboot. If you have questions about kernel
compiling, I highly recommend to consult some of the URLs mentioned above
in this section.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
3.2.2. Compiling Linux 2.2.x Kernels

Please see Section 2.7 for any required software, patches, etc.

* First of all, you need the kernel source for 2.2.x (preferably the latest
kernel version)

+ NOTE #1: --- UPDATE YOUR KERNEL --- Linux 2.2.x kernels less than
version 2.2.20 contain several different security vulnerabilities
(some were MASQ specific). Kernels less than 2.2.20 have a few local
vulnerabilities. Kernel versions less than 2.2.16 have a TCP root
exploit vulnerability and versions less than 2.2.11 have a IPCHAINS
fragmentation bug. Because of these issues, users running a firewall
with strong IPCHAINS rulesets are open to possible instrusion. Please
upgrade your kernel to a fixed version.

+ NOTE #2: As the 2.2.x train progressed, the compile-time options keep
on changing. As of this version, this section reflects the settings
for a 2.2.20 kernel.

If you are running either a newer or older kernel version, the
dialogs will look different. It is recommended that you update to the
newest kernel for added capability and stability of the system.


* If this is your first time compiling the kernel, don't be scared. In
fact, it's rather easy and it's covered in several URLs found in Section
2.7. Please note that the instructions included here is just one way to
do build a kernel. Please see the Kernel HOWTO for full details.

NOTE: Please notice that it isn't recommended to put the new kernel
sources into /usr/src/linux. You should leave the original kernel sources
that came with your Linux distribution in /usr/src/linux. For more
details on this topic, please read the "README" file in the top level
directory of your kernel sources.

* For this HOWTO example, create a directory called /usr/src/kernel. Next,
"cd" into this directory and download the newest 2.2.x kernel sources
into it. Once downloaded, issue the following command (if the file ends
in a .tar.gz): tar xvzf linux-2.2.x.tar.gz or (if the file ends in a
.tar.bzip2): tar xyvf linux-2.2.x.tar.bz2. Please substitute the "x" in
the 2.2.x filename with the Linux 2.2 kernel version you downloaded.

NOTE: Some Linux distributions use the "I" option instead of the "y"
option to decompress bzip2 archives.

Once uncompressed, I recommend that you rename the directory from "linux"
to "linux-2.2.x" for clarity. To do this, run the command mv linux
linux-2.2.x. Next, make sure there is a directory or symbolic link
pointing to /usr/src/kernel/linux ie. run the command: ln -s /usr/src/
kernel/linux-2.2.x /usr/src/kernel/linuxo again subsituting the "x" for
your proper kernel version.

* Apply any appropriate or optional patches to the kernel source code. By
default, stock Linux kernels do not require any specific patching in
order for the system to work. Features like PPTP/IPSEC masqurading are
already built-in in the newest kernels but other tools like Xwindows
forwarders are optional. Please refer to Section 2.7 for URLs and the
[http://ipmasq.webhop.net/] IP Masquerade Resources for up-to-date
information and patch URLs.

* Now that the kernel is patched up (if required), here are the MINIMUM
kernel configuration options required to enable IP Masquerade
functionality. Please understand that this HOWTO illustrates just ONE way
to compile a kernel. The main difference from this method vs. a different
one is some people wish to compile things either as modules OR
monolithically right into the kernel. Basically, compiling things as
modules gives you added flexibility to what is or isn't installed into
the kernel (reduces unneeded memory use and allow for drop-in upgrades
[no need to reboot]) BUT they add more complexity to your configuration.
On the flip side, compiling things directly into the kernel makes things
simpler BUT you loose a level of flexibility. The following example is a
mixture of both built-in AND modules.

Side Note: It is assumed that you will also configure the kernel to use
your other installed hardware such as network interfaces, optional SCSI
controllers, etc. as well. Please refer to the Linux Kernel HOWTO and the
kernel source's README file and Documentation/ directory for detailed
help on compiling a kernel.


Please note the YES or NO ANSWERS to the following. Not all options will be
available without the proper kernel patches described later in this HOWTO.

Run the following commands to configure your kernel:

* cd /usr/src/kernel/linux

* make menuconfig




The following kernel prompts reflect a 2.2.20 kernel:

+------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|[ Code maturity level options ] |
| |
| * Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers (CONFIG_EXPERIMENTAL) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: though not entirely required for IP MASQ, this option allows the kernel |
| to create possible additional MASQ modules such as PORTFW, etc. |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (CPU, memory, MTRR, SMP, etc.) |
| |
| |
|[ Loadable module support ] |
| |
| * Enable loadable module support (CONFIG_MODULES) [Y/n/?] y |
| - YES: allows you to load kernel IP MASQ modules |
| |
| * Set version information on all symbols for modules (CONFIG_MODVERSIONS) [N/y/?] y |
| - YES: allows newer kernels to load older modules if possible |
| |
| * Kernel module loader (CONFIG_KMOD) [Y/n/?] y |
| - OPTIONAL: Recommended : allows the kernel to load various kernel modules as |
| it needs them |
| |
| |
|[ General setup ] |
| |
| * Networking support (CONFIG_NET) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: This enables the network subsystem |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (PCI, kernel binaries, specific hardware options, etc.) |
| |
| |
| * Sysctl support (CONFIG_SYSCTL) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: Enables the ability to enable disable options such as forwarding, |
| dynamic IPs, etc. via the /proc interface |
| |
| |
|[ Block devices ] |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (kernel binaries, power management, PnP, IDE, SCSI, etc.) |
| |
| == Don't forget to compile in support for hardware that you might need: |
| == IDE controllers, HDs, CDROMs, etc. |
| |
| |
|[ Networking options ] |
| |
| |
| * Packet socket (CONFIG_PACKET) [Y/m/n/?] y |
| - YES: Though this is OPTIONAL, this recommended feature will allow you |
| to use TCPDUMP to debug any problems with IP MASQ |
| |
| * Kernel/User netlink socket (CONFIG_NETLINK) [Y/n/?] y |
| - OPTIONAL: Recommended : This feature will allow the logging of |
| advanced firewall issues such as routing messages, etc |
| |
| * Routing messages (CONFIG_RTNETLINK) [Y/n/?] y |
| - OPTIONAL: If you enabled the CONFIG_NETLINK option above, this option |
| will send routing messages and other information to SYSLOG. |
| |
| * Netlink device emulation (CONFIG_NETLINK_DEV) [N/y/m/?] (NEW) n |
| - NO: This option does not have anything to do with packet firewall |
| logging |
| |
| * Network firewalls (CONFIG_FIREWALL) [Y/n/?] y |
| - YES: Enables the kernel to be comfigured by the IPCHAINS firewall tool |
| |
| * Socket Filtering (CONFIG_FILTER) [Y/n/?] y |
| - OPTIONAL: Though this doesn't have anything do with IPMASQ, if you |
| plan on implimenting a DHCP server on the internal network, you |
| WILL need this option. |
| |
| * Unix domain sockets (CONFIG_UNIX) [Y/m/n/?] y |
| - YES: This enables the UNIX TCP/IP sockets mechanisms |
| |
| * TCP/IP networking (CONFIG_INET) [Y/n/?] y |
| - YES: Enables the TCP/IP protocol |
| |
| * IP: multicasting (CONFIG_IP_MULTICAST) [N/y/?] y |
| - OPTIONAL: You can enable this if you want to be able to receive |
| Multicast traffic. Please note that your ISP must |
| support Multicast as well for this all to work |
| |
| * IP: advanced router (CONFIG_IP_ADVANCED_ROUTER) [Y/n/?] n |
| - OPTIONAL: Though there is nothing in this section mandatory for |
| Masquerade, some specific options might be useful |
| |
| * IP: kernel level autoconfiguration (CONFIG_IP_PNP) [N/y/?] ? |
| - NO: Not needed for normal MASQ functionality |
| |
| * IP: firewalling (CONFIG_IP_FIREWALL) [Y/n/?] y |
| - YES: This enables the kernel to support packet filtering, NAT, etc. |
| |
| * IP: firewall packet netlink device (CONFIG_IP_FIREWALL_NETLINK) [Y/n/?] n |
| - OPTIONAL: Though this is OPTIONAL, this feature will allow IPCHAINS to |
| copy some packets to UserSpace tools for additional checks |
| |
| * IP: transparent proxy support (CONFIG_IP_TRANSPARENT_PROXY) [N/y/?] n |
| - OPTIONAL: Not needed for normal MASQ functionality though people who |
| want to do transparent proxy via Squid will want this. Please note |
| that there is a PERFORMANCE PENALTY enabling this feature. |
| |
| * IP: masquerading (CONFIG_IP_MASQUERADE) [Y/n/?] y |
| - YES: Enable IP Masquerade to re-address specific internal to external |
| TCP/IP packets |
| |
| * IP: ICMP masquerading (CONFIG_IP_MASQUERADE_ICMP) [Y/n/?] y |
| - YES: Enable support for masquerading ICMP ping packets (ICMP error |
| codes will be MASQed regardless). This is an important feature |
| for troubleshooting connections. |
| |
| * IP: masquerading special modules support (CONFIG_IP_MASQUERADE_MOD) [Y/n/?] y |
| - YES: Though OPTIONAL, this enables the option to later enable other |
| modules like the PORTFW to give external computers a directly |
| connection to specified internal MASQed machines. |
| |
| * IP: ipautofw masq support (EXPERIMENTAL) (CONFIG_IP_MASQUERADE_IPAUTOFW) [N/y/m/?] n |
| - NO: NOT recommended : IPautofw is a legacy method of port forwarding. It |
| is mainly old code and has been found to have some issues. |
| |
| * IP: ipportfw masq support (EXPERIMENTAL) (CONFIG_IP_MASQUERADE_IPPORTFW) [Y/m/n/?] y |
| - OPTIONAL: Recommended : This enables PORTFW which allows external computers |
| on the Internet to directly communicate to specified internal MASQed |
| machines. This feature is typically used to allow access to internal |
| SMTP, TELNET, and WWW servers. Please note that FTP port forwarding |
| needs an additional patch, as described in the FAQ section of the MASQ |
| HOWTO. Please see the this FAQ section in the HOWTO for additional |
| information. |
| |
| * IP: ip fwmark masq-forwarding support (EXPERIMENTAL) (CONFIG_IP_MASQUERADE_MFW) [Y/m/n/?] y |
| - OPTIONAL: This is a NEW method of performing PORTFW-like functionality which is |
| similar to how the new 2.4.x kernels do things. With this option, IPCHAINS |
| can mark packets that should have additional work done upon it. Using a |
| UserSpace tool, much like IPMASQADM or IPPORFW, IPCHAINS would then |
| do things like re-address the packets, change their TOS value, etc. |
| Currently, this code is less tested than PORTFW but it looks promising. |
| For now, this HOWTO recommends to use IPMASQADM and IPPORTFW. If you |
| have specific thoughts or comments on MFW, please email dranch. |
| |
| * IP: optimize as a router not host (CONFIG_IP_ROUTER) [Y/n/?] y |
| - YES: This optimizes the kernel for the network subsystem, though it |
| isn't well known if this makes a siginificant performance difference |
| or not. |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == ( autoconf, tunneling, GRE ) |
| |
| |
| * IP: multicast routing (CONFIG_IP_MROUTE) [N/y/?] n |
| - OPTIONAL: Though not needed for IPMASQ, enabling this feature will |
| let you route multicast traffic through your Linux box. |
| Please note that this requires that your ISP be multicast |
| enabled as well. |
| |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (Aliasing, ARPd) |
| |
| * IP: TCP syncookie support (disabled per default) (CONFIG_SYN_COOKIES) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: Recommended : for basic TCP/IP network security |
| |
| * IP: GRE tunnels over IP (CONFIG_NET_IPGRE) [N/y/m/?] |
| - NO: This OPTIONAL selection is to enable PPTP and GRE tunnels through |
| the IP MASQ box |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (aliasing, ARPd) |
| |
| |
| * IP: TCP syncookie support (not enabled per default) (CONFIG_SYN_COOKIES) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: HIGHLY recommended for basic TCP/IP network security |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (RARP) |
| |
| |
| * IP: Allow large windows (not recommended if <16Mb of memory) * (CONFIG_SKB_LARGE) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: This is recommended to optimize Linux's TCP window |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (IPv6, IPX, WAN router, etc.) |
| |
| * Fast switching (read help!) (CONFIG_NET_FASTROUTE) [N/y/?] n |
| - NO: This performance optimization is NOT compatible with IP MASQ and/or |
| packet filtering |
| |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (Slow CPU, Telephony, SCSI, I2O, etc. ) |
| |
| == Don't forget to compile in support for hardware that you might need: |
| == SCSI: HDs, CDROMs, etc. |
| |
| |
|[ Network device support ] |
| |
| * Network device support (CONFIG_NETDEVICES) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: Enables the Linux Network device sublayer |
| |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (Arcnet) |
| |
| |
| * Dummy net driver support (CONFIG_DUMMY) [M/n/y/?] |
| - YES: Though OPTIONAL, this option can help when debugging problems |
| |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (EQL, NICs, Wireless, IrDA, ISDN, etc..) |
| |
| == Don't forget to compile in support for hardware that you might need: |
| == NICs: eth, tr, etc. |
| == MODEMs: ppp and/or slip |
| == WANs: T1, T3, ISDN, etc. |
| == ISDN: for internal ISDN modems |
| |
| |
| [ Character devices ] |
| |
| == Don't forget to compile in serial port support for modem users |
| == Don't forget to compile in mouse support |
| |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (I2C, Watchdog cards, Ftape, Video for Linux, USB, etc. ) |
| |
| |
|[ File systems ] |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (Quota, ISO9660, NTFS, etc ) |
| |
| |
| * /proc filesystem support (CONFIG_PROC_FS) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: Required to dynamically configure the Linux forwarding |
| and NATing systems |
| |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (network fs, NLS, video section, sound, kernel hacking) |
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
So go ahead and "exit" and you should be prompted to save your config.

NOTE: These are just the components you need for IP Masquerade. You will need
to select whatever other options needed for your specific setup.

* Now compile the kernel (make dep; make clean; make bzImage; make modules;
make modules_install) , etc. Again, it is beyond the scope of this HOWTO
if you have problems compiling your kernel. Please see Section 2.7 for
URLs to the KERNEL howto, etc.

* You will then have move over the kernel binary, update your bootloader
(LILO, Grub, etc.), and reboot. If you have questions about kernel
compiling, I highly recommend to consult some of the URLs above in this
section.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
3.2.3. Compiling Linux 2.0.x Kernels

Please see Section 2.8 for any required software, patches, etc.

* First of all, you need the kernel source for 2.0.x (preferably the latest
kernel version)

+ As the 2.0.x train progress, the compile-time options keep on
changing. As of this version, this section reflects the settings for
a 2.0.39 kernel.


* If this is your first time compiling the kernel, don't be scared. In
fact, it's rather easy and it's covered in several URLs found in Section
2.8. Please note that the instructions included here is just one way to
do build a kernel. Please see the Kernel HOWTO for full details.

NOTE: Please notice that it isn't recommended to put the new kernel
sources into /usr/src/linux. You should leave the original kernel sources
that came with your Linux distribution in /usr/src/linux. For more
details on this topic, please read the "README" file in the top level
directory of your kernel sources.

* For this HOWTO example, create a directory called /usr/src/kernel. Next,
"cd" into this directory and download the newest 2.0.x kernel sources
into it. Once downloaded, issue the following command: tar xvzf
linux-2.0.x.tar.gz . Please substitute the "x" in the 2.0.x filename with
the Linux 2.0 kernel version you downloaded.

Once uncompressed, I recommend that you rename the directory from "linux"
to "linux-2.0.x" for clarity. To do this, run the command mv linux
linux-2.0.x. Next, make sure there is a directory or symbolic link
pointing to /usr/src/kernel/linux ie. run the command: ln -s /usr/src/
kernel/linux-2.0.x /usr/src/kernel/linuxo again subsituting the "x" for
your proper kernel version.

* Apply any appropriate or optional patches to the kernel source code. By
default, stock Linux kernels do not require any specific patching in
order for the system to work. Features like IPPORTFW, PPTP, and Xwindows
forwarders are optional but very useful. Please refer to Section 2.8 for
URLs and the [http://ipmasq.webhop.net/] IP Masquerade Resources for
up-to-date information and patch URLs.

* Now that the kernel is patched up (if required), here are the MINIMUM
kernel configuration options required to enable IP Masquerade
functionality. Please understand that this HOWTO illustrates just ONE way
to compile a kernel. The main difference from this method vs. a different
one is some people wish to compile things either as modules OR
monolithically right into the kernel. Basically, compiling things as
modules gives you added flexibility to what is or isn't installed into
the kernel (reduces unneeded memory use and allow for drop-in upgrades
[no need to reboot]) BUT they add more complexity to your configuration.
On the flip side, compiling things directly into the kernel makes things
simpler BUT you loose a level of flexibility. The following example is a
mixture of both built-in AND modules.

Side Note: It is assumed that you will also configure the kernel to use
your other installed hardware such as network interfaces, optional SCSI
controllers, etc. as well. Please refer to the Linux Kernel HOWTO and the
kernel source's "README" file and "Documentation/" directory for detailed
help on compiling a kernel.


Please note the YES or NO ANSWERS to the following options. Not all options
will be available without the proper kernel patches described later in this
HOWTO:

Run the following commands to configure your kernel:

* cd /usr/src/kernel/linux

* make menuconfig


The following kernel prompts reflect a 2.0.39 kernel:

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|[ Code maturity level options ] |
| |
| * Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers (CONFIG_EXPERIMENTAL) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: this will allow you to later select the IP Masquerade feature code |
| |
| |
|[ Loadable module support ] |
| |
| * Enable loadable module support (CONFIG_MODULES) [Y/n/?] y |
| - YES: allows you to load kernel IP MASQ modules |
| |
| * Set version information on all module symbols (CONFIG_MODVERSIONS) [N/y/?] y |
| - YES: allows newer kernels to load older modules if possible |
| |
| * Kernel daemon support (e.g. autoload of modules) (CONFIG_KERNELD) [N/y/?] y |
| - OPTIONAL: Recommended : allows the kernel to load various kernel modules as |
| it needs them |
| |
| |
|[ General setup ] |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (FPU, memory) |
| |
| * Networking support (CONFIG_NET) [Y/n/?] y |
| - YES: Enables the network subsystem |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (memory, PCI, binary format, APM, etc.) |
| |
| == Don't forget to compile in support for hardware that you might need: |
| == IDE controllers, HDs, CDROMs, etc. |
| |
| |
|[ Networking options ] |
| |
| * Network firewalls (CONFIG_FIREWALL) [Y/n/?] y |
| - YES: Enables the IPFWADM firewall tool |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (Aliasing) |
| |
| |
| * TCP/IP networking (CONFIG_INET) [Y/n/?] y |
| - YES: Enables the TCP/IP protocol |
| |
| * IP: forwarding/gatewaying (CONFIG_IP_FORWARD) [N/y/?] y |
| - YES: Enables Linux network packet forwarding and routing |
| - Controlled by IPFWADM |
| |
| * IP: multicasting (CONFIG_IP_MULTICAST) [N/y/?] y |
| - OPTIONAL: You can enable this if you want to be able to receive |
| Multicast traffic. Please note that your ISP must |
| support Multicast as well for this all to work |
| |
| * IP: syn cookies (CONFIG_SYN_COOKIES) [Y/n/?] y |
| - YES: HIGHLY recommended for basic network security |
| |
| * IP: firewalling (CONFIG_IP_FIREWALL) [Y/n/?] y |
| - YES: Enable the packet firewall features |
| |
| * IP: firewall packet logging (CONFIG_IP_FIREWALL_VERBOSE) [Y/n/?] y |
| - YES: Allows the kernel to report back on various packets traversing |
| the firewall. |
| |
| * IP: masquerading (CONFIG_IP_MASQUERADE [Y/n/?] y |
| - YES: Enable the kernel to perform IP MASQ NAT functionality |
| |
| * IP: ipautofw masquerade support (EXPERIMENTAL) (CONFIG_IP_MASQUERADE_IPAUTOFW) [Y/n/?] n |
| - NO: NOT Recommended : IPautofw is a legacy method of TCP/IP port forwarding. |
| Though IPautofw works, IPPORTFW is a better choice. |
| |
| |
| * IP: ipportfw masq support (EXPERIMENTAL) (CONFIG_IP_MASQUERADE_IPPORTFW) [Y/n/?] y |
| - YES: This option is ONLY AVAILABLE VIA A PATCH for the 2.0.x kernels. |
| With this option, external computers on the Internet can directly |
| communicate to specified internal MASQed machines. This feature is |
| typically used to access internal SMTP, TELNET, and WWW servers. |
| FTP port forwarding sometimes might require an additional patch as |
| described in the FAQ section. Additional information on port |
| forwarding is available in the Forwards section of this HOWTO. |
| |
| |
| * IP: MS PPTP masq support (EXPERIMENTAL) (CONFIG_IP_MASQUERADE_PPTP) [N/y/?] (NEW) n |
| - OPTIONAL: Enabling this feature will allow internal MASQ clients to |
| properly connect to PPTP servers on the Internet. |
| |
| * IP: MS PPTP Call ID masq support (CONFIG_IP_MASQUERADE_PPTP_MULTICLIENT) [N/y/?] (NEW) n |
| - OPTIONAL: If you enabled the CONFIG_IP_MASQUERADE_PPTP above, this |
| option will allow for multiple internal PPTP clients behind the MASQ |
| server to communicate to the same PPTP server. |
| |
| * IP: MS PPTP masq debugging (DEBUG_IP_MASQUERADE_PPTP) [N/y/?] n |
| - OPTIONAL: NOT recommended : This is not required for IP MASQ or MASQing PPTP |
| connections unless you need additional troubleshooting help. If enabled, |
| this can fill up your logs quickly. |
| |
| * IP: MS PPTP masq verbose debugging (DEBUG_IP_MASQUERADE_PPTP_VERBOSE) [N/y/?] (NEW) n |
| - OPTIONAL: NOT Recommended : If you enabled the DEBUG_IP_MASQUERADE_PPTP |
| option above, this will make the logging even more verbose. |
| |
| * IP: IPSEC ESP & ISAKMP masq support (EXPERIMENTAL) * (CONFIG_IP_MASQUERADE_IPSEC) [N/y/?] m |
| - OPTIONAL: This option allows for some forms of IPSEC tunnels to be |
| masquraded |
| |
| * IP: IPSEC masq table lifetime (minutes) (CONFIG_IP_MASQUERADE_IPSEC_EXPIRE) * [30] (NEW) |
| - OPTIONAL: This feature allows to change the MASQ table timeouts so that |
| idle IPSEC tunnels won't be prematurely disconnected. |
| |
| * IP: Disable inbound ESP destination guessing * (CONFIG_IP_MASQUERADE_IPSEC_NOGUESS) [N/y/?] n |
| - OPTIONAL: This feature allows the kernel to guess where the fully encrypted IPSEC VPN |
| might be going and add it to the MASQ table. |
| |
| * IP: IPSEC masq debugging (DEBUG_IP_MASQUERADE_IPSEC) [N/y/?] ? n |
| - OPTIONAL: NOT recommended : This is not required for IP MASQ or MASQing IPSEC |
| connections unless you need additional troubleshooting help. If enabled, |
| this can fill up your logs quickly. |
| |
| * IP: IPSEC masq verbose debugging (DEBUG_IP_MASQUERADE_IPSEC_VERBOSE) [N/y/?] (NEW) n |
| - OPTIONAL: NOT Recommended : If you enabled the DEBUG_IP_MASQUERADE_IPSEC |
| option above, this will make the logging even more verbose. |
| |
| |
| * IP: ICMP masquerading (CONFIG_IP_MASQUERADE_ICMP) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: Enable support for masquerading ICMP packets. Though thought of as |
| optional, many programs will NOT function properly with out ICMP |
| support. |
| |
| * IP: transparent proxy support (EXPERIMENTAL) (CONFIG_IP_TRANSPARENT_PROXY) [N/y/?] n |
| - OPTIONAL: Not needed for normal MASQ functionality though people who |
| want to do transparent proxy via Squid will want this. Please note |
| that there is a PERFORMANCE PENALTY enabling this feature. |
| |
| * IP: loose UDP port managing (EXPERIMENTAL) (CONFIG_IP_MASQ_LOOSE_UDP) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: This option is ONLY AVAILABLE VIA A PATCH for the 2.0.x kernels. |
| With this option, internally masqueraded computers can play |
| NAT-friendly games over the Internet. Explicit details are given |
| in the FAQ section of this HOWTO. |
| |
| * IP: always defragment (CONFIG_IP_ALWAYS_DEFRAG) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: This feature optimizes IP MASQ connections |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (Accounting) |
| |
| |
| * IP: optimize as router not host (CONFIG_IP_ROUTER) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: This optimizes the kernel for the network subsystem |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (Tunneling, Mcast routing, RARP, PMTU, etc.) |
| |
| |
| * IP: Drop source routed frames (CONFIG_IP_NOSR) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: HIGHLY recommended for basic network security |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (IPX, Bridging, SCSI, etc.) |
| |
| == Don't forget to compile in support for hardware that you might need: |
| == SCSI controllers, HDs, CDROMs, etc. |
| |
| |
|[ Network device support ] |
| |
| * Network device support (CONFIG_NETDEVICES) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: Enables the Linux Network device sublayer |
| |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (Dummy, EQL, PPP, SLIP, NICs, Wireless, etc.) |
| |
| == Don't forget to compile in support for hardware that you might need: |
| == NICs: eth, tr, etc. |
| == MODEMs: ppp and/or slip |
| == WANs: T1, T3, ISDN, etc. |
| == ISDN: for internal ISDN modems |
| |
| |
|[ File systems ] |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (Quota, ISO9660, Codepages, NTFS, etc ) |
| |
| |
| * /proc filesystem support (CONFIG_PROC_FS) [Y/n/?] |
| - YES: Required to dynamically configure the Linux forwarding |
| and NATing systems |
| |
| |
| [ Character devices ] |
| |
| == Non-MASQ options skipped |
| == (multi-port serial, parallel, mice, Ftape, Sound, etc. ) |
| |
| == Don't forget to compile in serial port support for modem users |
| == Don't forget to compile in mouse support |
| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+

So go ahead and "exit" and you should be prompted to save your config.

NOTE: These are only components for IP Masquerade functionality. You may need
to also select additional options to match your specific network and hardware
setup.

* Now compile the kernel (make dep; make clean; make bzImage; make modules;
make modules_install) , etc. Again, it is beyond the scope of this HOWTO
if you have problems compiling your kernel. Please see Section 2.8 for
URLs to the KERNEL howto, etc.

* You will then have move over the kernel binary, update your bootloader
(LILO, Grub, etc.), and reboot. If you have questions about kernel
compiling, I highly recommend to consult some of the URLs above in this
section.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
3.3. Assigning Private Network IP Addresses to the Internal LAN

Since all INTERNAL MASQed machines should NOT have official Internet assigned
addressees, there must be a specific and accepted way to allocate addresses
to those machines without conflicting with anyone else's Internet address.

From the original IP Masquerade FAQ:

RFC 1918 is the official document on which IP addresses are to be used in a
non-connected or "private" network. There are 3 blocks of numbers set aside
specifically for this purpose.

+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|Section 3: Private Address Space |
| |
|The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) has reserved the |
|following three blocks of the IP address space for private networks: |
| |
| 10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 |
| 172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255 |
| 192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255 |
| |
|We will refer to the first block as "24-bit block", the second as "20-bit |
|block", and the third as "16-bit" block". Note that the first block is |
|nothing but a single class A network number, while the second block is a set |
|of 16 continuous class B network numbers, and the third block is a set of 255 |
|continuous class C network numbers. |
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+

For the record, my preference is to use the 192.168.0.0 network with a
255.255.255.0 Class-C subnet mask and thus this HOWTO reflects this. Any of
the above private networks are valid, but just be SURE to use the correct
subnet-mask.

So, if you're using a Class-C network, you should number your TCP/IP enabled
machines as 192.168.0.1, 192.168.0.2, 192.168.0.3, .., 192.168.0.x

192.168.0.1 is usually set as the internal gateway or Linux MASQ machine
which reaches the external network. Please note that 192.168.0.0 and
192.168.0.255 are the Network and Broadcast address respectively (these
addresses are RESERVED). Avoid using these addresses on your machines or your
network will not function properly.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

3.4. Configuring IP Forwarding Policies

At this point, you should have your kernel and other required packages
installed. All network IP addresses, gateway, and DNS addresses should be
configured on your Linux MASQ server. If you don't know how to configure your
Linux network cards, please consult the HOWTOs listed in either the 2.4.x
Section 2.6, the 2.2.x Section 2.7, or the 2.0.x Section 2.8.

Now, the only thing left to do is to configure the IP firewalling tools to
both FORWARD and MASQUERADE the appropriate packets to the correct machine.

** This section ONLY provides the user with the bare minimum firewall ruleset
to get IP Masquerading working.

Once IP MASQ has been successfully tested (as described later in this HOWTO),
please refer to the Stronger IPTABLES ruleset for 2.4.x kernels in Section
6.4.1, the Stronger IPCHAINS ruleset for 2.2.x kernels in Section 6.4.2, and
the Stronger IPFWADM ruleset for 2.0.x kernels in Section 6.4.3. Please note
that these stronger firewall rulesets are more of a template than anything
else. For truly secure firewall rulesets, check out the the requirements
section of the HOWTO ( 2.4.x - Section 2.6, 2.2.x - Section 2.7, 2.0.x -
Section 2.8 ).

Instead of manually typing one of these files by hand, I recommend to simply
browse the Example directory or [http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/
ipmasq/examples/rc.firewall-examples.tar.gz] download an archive of all of
these rc.firewall-* files.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

3.4.1. Configuring IP Masquerade on Linux 2.6.x and 2.4.x Kernels

Please note that IPCHAINS is no longer the primary firewall configuration
tool for the 2.6.x and 2.4.x kernels. The new kernels now use the IPTABLES
toolkit though the new 2.4.x kernels CAN still run most old IPCHAINS or
IPFWADM rulesets via a compatiblity module. It should also be noted that when
running in this compatibility mode, NO IPTABLES modules can be loaded. The
reason for this is that none of the 2.2.x IPMASQ modules are compatible with
2.4.x kernels. For a more detailes for these changes, please see the Section
7.40 section.

Ok, as mentioned before, the /etc/rc.d/rc.local-* script can be loaded once
after every reboot. The mechanism to load the script varies between different
Linux distros (please see below for some exampels). The rc.firewall-iptables
script will load all required IPMASQ modules as well as enable the final
IPMASQ functionality. For advanced setups, this same file would contain very
secure firewall rulesets as well.

Anyway, create the file /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-iptables with the following
initial SIMPLE ruleset:


+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|#!/bin/sh |
|# |
|# rc.firewall-iptables |
|FWVER=0.76 |
|# |
|# Initial SIMPLE IP Masquerade test for 2.6 / 2.4 kernels |
|# using IPTABLES. |
|# |
|# Once IP Masquerading has been tested, with this simple |
|# ruleset, it is highly recommended to use a stronger |
|# IPTABLES ruleset either given later in this HOWTO or |
|# from another reputable resource. |
|# |
|# |
|# |
|# Log: |
|# 0.76 - Added comments on why the default policy is ACCEPT |
|# 0.75 - Added more kernel modules to the comments section |
|# 0.74 - the ruleset now uses modprobe vs. insmod |
|# 0.73 - REJECT is not a legal policy yet; back to DROP |
|# 0.72 - Changed the default block behavior to REJECT not DROP |
|# 0.71 - Added clarification that PPPoE users need to use |
|# "ppp0" instead of "eth0" for their external interface |
|# 0.70 - Added commented option for IRC nat module |
|# - Added additional use of environment variables |
|# - Added additional formatting |
|# 0.63 - Added support for the IRC IPTABLES module |
|# 0.62 - Fixed a typo on the MASQ enable line that used eth0 |
|# instead of $EXTIF |
|# 0.61 - Changed the firewall to use variables for the internal |
|# and external interfaces. |
|# 0.60 - 0.50 had a mistake where the ruleset had a rule to DROP |
|# all forwarded packets but it didn't have a rule to ACCEPT |
|# any packets to be forwarded either |
|# - Load the ip_nat_ftp and ip_conntrack_ftp modules by default |
|# 0.50 - Initial draft |
|# |
| |
|echo -e "\n\nLoading simple rc.firewall-iptables version $FWVER..\n" |
| |
| |
|# The location of the iptables and kernel module programs |
|# |
|# If your Linux distribution came with a copy of iptables, |
|# most likely all the programs will be located in /sbin. If |
|# you manually compiled iptables, the default location will |
|# be in /usr/local/sbin |
|# |
|# ** Please use the "whereis iptables" command to figure out |
|# ** where your copy is and change the path below to reflect |
|# ** your setup |
|# |
|#IPTABLES=/sbin/iptables |
|IPTABLES=/usr/local/sbin/iptables |
|DEPMOD=/sbin/depmod |
|MODPROBE=/sbin/modprobe |
| |
| |
|#Setting the EXTERNAL and INTERNAL interfaces for the network |
|# |
|# Each IP Masquerade network needs to have at least one |
|# external and one internal network. The external network |
|# is where the natting will occur and the internal network |
|# should preferably be addressed with a RFC1918 private address |
|# scheme. |
|# |
|# For this example, "eth0" is external and "eth1" is internal" |
|# |
|# |
|# NOTE: If this doesnt EXACTLY fit your configuration, you must |
|# change the EXTIF or INTIF variables above. For example: |
|# |
|# If you are a PPPoE or analog modem user: |
|# |
|# EXTIF="ppp0" |
|# |
|# |
|EXTIF="eth0" |
|INTIF="eth1" |
|echo " External Interface: $EXTIF" |
|echo " Internal Interface: $INTIF" |
| |
| |
|#====================================================================== |
|#== No editing beyond this line is required for initial MASQ testing == |
| |
| |
|echo -en " loading modules: " |
| |
|# Need to verify that all modules have all required dependencies |
|# |
|echo " - Verifying that all kernel modules are ok" |
|$DEPMOD -a |
| |
|# With the new IPTABLES code, the core MASQ functionality is now either |
|# modular or compiled into the kernel. This HOWTO shows ALL IPTABLES |
|# options as MODULES. If your kernel is compiled correctly, there is |
|# NO need to load the kernel modules manually. |
|# |
|# NOTE: The following items are listed ONLY for informational reasons. |
|# There is no reason to manual load these modules unless your |
|# kernel is either mis-configured or you intentionally disabled |
|# the kernel module autoloader. |
|# |
| |
|# Upon the commands of starting up IP Masq on the server, the |
|# following kernel modules will be automatically loaded: |
|# |
|# NOTE: Only load the IP MASQ modules you need. All current IP MASQ |
|# modules are shown below but are commented out from loading. |
|# =============================================================== |
| |
|echo "----------------------------------------------------------------------" |
| |
|#Load the main body of the IPTABLES module - "iptable" |
|# - Loaded automatically when the "iptables" command is invoked |
|# |
|# - Loaded manually to clean up kernel auto-loading timing issues |
|# |
|echo -en "ip_tables, " |
|$MODPROBE ip_tables |
| |
| |
|#Load the IPTABLES filtering module - "iptable_filter" |
|# - Loaded automatically when filter policies are activated |
| |
| |
|#Load the stateful connection tracking framework - "ip_conntrack" |
|# |
|# The conntrack module in itself does nothing without other specific |
|# conntrack modules being loaded afterwards such as the "ip_conntrack_ftp" |
|# module |
|# |
|# - This module is loaded automatically when MASQ functionality is |
|# enabled |
|# |
|# - Loaded manually to clean up kernel auto-loading timing issues |
|# |
|echo -en "ip_conntrack, " |
|$MODPROBE ip_conntrack |
| |
| |
|#Load the FTP tracking mechanism for full FTP tracking |
|# |
|# Enabled by default -- insert a "#" on the next line to deactivate |
|# |
|echo -en "ip_conntrack_ftp, " |
|$MODPROBE ip_conntrack_ftp |
| |
| |
|#Load the IRC tracking mechanism for full IRC tracking |
|# |
|# Enabled by default -- insert a "#" on the next line to deactivate |
|# |
|echo -en "ip_conntrack_irc, " |
|$MODPROBE ip_conntrack_irc |
| |
| |
|#Load the general IPTABLES NAT code - "iptable_nat" |
|# - Loaded automatically when MASQ functionality is turned on |
|# |
|# - Loaded manually to clean up kernel auto-loading timing issues |
|# |
|echo -en "iptable_nat, " |
|$MODPROBE iptable_nat |
| |
| |
|#Loads the FTP NAT functionality into the core IPTABLES code |
|# Required to support non-PASV FTP. |
|# |
|# Enabled by default -- insert a "#" on the next line to deactivate |
|# |
|echo -en "ip_nat_ftp, " |
|$MODPROBE ip_nat_ftp |
| |
| |
|#Loads the IRC NAT functionality into the core IPTABLES code |
|# Required to support NAT of IRC DCC requests |
|# |
|# Disabled by default -- remove the "#" on the next line to activate |
|# |
|#echo -e "ip_nat_irc" |
|#$MODPROBE ip_nat_irc |
| |
|echo "----------------------------------------------------------------------" |
| |
|# Just to be complete, here is a partial list of some of the other |
|# IPTABLES kernel modules and their function. Please note that most |
|# of these modules (the ipt ones) are automatically loaded by the |
|# master kernel module for proper operation and don't need to be |
|# manually loaded. |
|# -------------------------------------------------------------------- |
|# |
|# ip_nat_snmp_basic - this module allows for proper NATing of some |
|# SNMP traffic |
|# |
|# iptable_mangle - this target allows for packets to be |
|# manipulated for things like the TCPMSS |
|# option, etc. |
|# |
|# -- |
|# |
|# ipt_mark - this target marks a given packet for future action. |
|# This automatically loads the ipt_MARK module |
|# |
|# ipt_tcpmss - this target allows to manipulate the TCP MSS |
|# option for braindead remote firewalls. |
|# This automatically loads the ipt_TCPMSS module |
|# |
|# ipt_limit - this target allows for packets to be limited to |
|# to many hits per sec/min/hr |
|# |
|# ipt_multiport - this match allows for targets within a range |
|# of port numbers vs. listing each port individually |
|# |
|# ipt_state - this match allows to catch packets with various |
|# IP and TCP flags set/unset |
|# |
|# ipt_unclean - this match allows to catch packets that have invalid |
|# IP/TCP flags set |
|# |
|# iptable_filter - this module allows for packets to be DROPped, |
|# REJECTed, or LOGged. This module automatically |
|# loads the following modules: |
|# |
|# ipt_LOG - this target allows for packets to be |
|# logged |
|# |
|# ipt_REJECT - this target DROPs the packet and returns |
|# a configurable ICMP packet back to the |
|# sender. |
|# |
| |
|echo -e " Done loading modules.\n" |
| |
| |
| |
|#CRITICAL: Enable IP forwarding since it is disabled by default since |
|# |
|# Redhat Users: you may try changing the options in |
|# /etc/sysconfig/network from: |
|# |
|# FORWARD_IPV4=false |
|# to |
|# FORWARD_IPV4=true |
|# |
|echo " Enabling forwarding.." |
|echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward |
| |
| |
|# Dynamic IP users: |
|# |
|# If you get your IP address dynamically from SLIP, PPP, or DHCP, |
|# enable this following option. This enables dynamic-address hacking |
|# which makes the life with Diald and similar programs much easier. |
|# |
|echo " Enabling DynamicAddr.." |
|echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_dynaddr |
| |
| |
|# Enable simple IP forwarding and Masquerading |
|# |
|# NOTE: In IPTABLES speak, IP Masquerading is a form of SourceNAT or SNAT. |
|# |
|# NOTE #2: The following is an example for an internal LAN address in the |
|# 192.168.0.x network with a 255.255.255.0 or a "24" bit subnet mask |
|# connecting to the Internet on external interface "eth0". This |
|# example will MASQ internal traffic out to the Internet but not |
|# allow non-initiated traffic into your internal network. |
|# |
|# |
|# ** Please change the above network numbers, subnet mask, and your |
|# *** Internet connection interface name to match your setup |
|# |
| |
| |
|#Clearing any previous configuration |
|# |
|# Unless specified, the defaults for INPUT and OUTPUT is ACCEPT |
|# The default for FORWARD is DROP (REJECT is not a valid policy) |
|# |
|# Isn't ACCEPT insecure? To some degree, YES, but this is our testing |
|# phase. Once we know that IPMASQ is working well, I recommend you run |
|# the rc.firewall-*-stronger rulesets which set the defaults to DROP but |
|# also include the critical additional rulesets to still let you connect to |
|# the IPMASQ server, etc. |
|# |
|echo " Clearing any existing rules and setting default policy.." |
|$IPTABLES -P INPUT ACCEPT |
|$IPTABLES -F INPUT |
|$IPTABLES -P OUTPUT ACCEPT |
|$IPTABLES -F OUTPUT |
|$IPTABLES -P FORWARD DROP |
|$IPTABLES -F FORWARD |
|$IPTABLES -t nat -F |
| |
|echo " FWD: Allow all connections OUT and only existing and related ones IN" |
|$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -i $EXTIF -o $INTIF -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT |
|$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -i $INTIF -o $EXTIF -j ACCEPT |
|$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -j LOG |
| |
|echo " Enabling SNAT (MASQUERADE) functionality on $EXTIF" |
|$IPTABLES -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o $EXTIF -j MASQUERADE |
| |
|echo -e "\nrc.firewall-iptables v$FWVER done.\n" |
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+


Once you are finished with editing this /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-iptables
ruleset, make it executable by typing in chmod 700 /etc/rc.d/
rc.firewall-iptables

Now that the firewall ruleset is ready, you need to let it run after every
reboot. You could either do this by running it by hand everytime (such a
pain) or add it to the boot scripts. We have covered two methods below:
Redhat (SyS-V style) and Slackware (BSD style)

1. Redhat and Redhat-derived distros:

* There are two ways to automatically load things in Redhat: /etc/rc.d/
rc.local or a init script in /etc/rc.d/init.d/. The first method is the
easiest but isn't doing things the SYS-V way. All you have to do is add
the line:

+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|echo "Loading the rc.firewall-iptables ruleset.. " |
|/etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-iptables |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

to the end of the /etc/rc.d/rc.local file and thats it (as described
earlier in the HOWTO).

The problem with this approach is that the firewall isn't executed until
the last stages of booting.

* The preferred approach is to have the firewall loaded just after the
networking subsystem is loaded. To do this, copy the following file into
the /etc/rc.d/init.d directory:


+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|#!/bin/sh |
|# |
|# chkconfig: 2345 11 89 |
|# |
|# description: Loads the rc.firewall-iptables ruleset. |
|# |
|# processname: firewall-iptables |
|# pidfile: /var/run/firewall.pid |
|# config: /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-iptables |
|# probe: true |
| |
|# ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- |
|# v05/24/03 |
|# |
|# Part of the copyrighted and trademarked TrinityOS document. |
|# http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch |
|# |
|# Written and Maintained by David A. Ranch |
|# dranch@trinnet.net |
|# |
|# Updates |
|# ------- |
|# 05/24/03 - removed a old networking up check that had some |
|# improper SGML ampersand conversions. |
|# ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- |
| |
| |
|# Source function library. |
|. /etc/rc.d/init.d/functions |
| |
|# Check that networking is up. |
| |
|[ "XXXX${NETWORKING}" = "XXXXno" ] && exit 0 |
| |
|[ -x /sbin/ifconfig ] || exit 0 |
| |
|# The location of various iptables and other shell programs |
|# |
|# If your Linux distribution came with a copy of iptables, most |
|# likely it is located in /sbin. If you manually compiled |
|# iptables, the default location is in /usr/local/sbin |
|# |
|# ** Please use the "whereis iptables" command to figure out |
|# ** where your copy is and change the path below to reflect |
|# ** your setup |
|# |
|IPTABLES=/usr/local/sbin/iptables |
| |
| |
|# See how we were called. |
|case "$1" in |
| start) |
| /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-iptables |
| ;; |
| |
| stop) |
| echo -e "\nFlushing firewall and setting default policies to DROP\n" |
| $IPTABLES -P INPUT DROP |
| $IPTABLES -F INPUT |
| $IPTABLES -P OUTPUT DROP |
| $IPTABLES -F OUTPUT |
| $IPTABLES -P FORWARD DROP |
| $IPTABLES -F FORWARD |
| $IPTABLES -F -t nat |
| |
| # Delete all User-specified chains |
| $IPTABLES -X |
| # |
| # Reset all IPTABLES counters |
| $IPTABLES -Z |
| ;; |
| |
| restart) |
| $0 stop |
| $0 start |
| ;; |
| |
| status) |
| $IPTABLES -L |
| ;; |
| |
| mlist) |
| cat /proc/net/ip_conntrack |
| ;; |
| |
| *) |
| echo "Usage: firewall-iptables {start|stop|status|mlist}" |
| exit 1 |
|esac |
| |
|exit 0 |
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+


With this script in place, all you need to do now is make it executable
and then make it load upon reboot. First, make it executable by running:
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|#Redhat-style |
|# |
|chmod 700 /etc/rc.d/init.d/firewall-iptables |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
Now, enable the ruleset load upon reboot:
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|#Redhat style |
|# |
|/sbin/chkconfig --level=345 firewall-iptables on |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
That's it! Now upon reboot, the firewall will be loaded automatically.
Just to make sure, run the following command to see that the firewall
should start upon reboot by running the command:
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|#Redhat style |
|# |
|chkconfig --list firewall-iptables |
| |
|#The output should look like: |
|# |
|firewall-iptables 0:off 1:off 2:off 3:on 4:on 5:on 6:off |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+


2. Slackware:

* There are two ways to load things in Slackware: /etc/rc.d/rc.local or
editing the /etc/rc.d/rc.inet2 file. The first method is the easiest but
isn't the most secure (see below). All you have to do is append the
following lines to the /etc/rc.d/rc.local file:

+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|echo "Loading the rc.firewall-iptables ruleset.." |
| |
|/etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-iptables |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

The problem with this approach is that if you are running a STRONG
firewall ruleset, the firewall isn't executed until the last stages of
booting. The preferred approach is to have the firewall loaded just after
the networking subsystem is loaded. For now, the HOWTO only covers how to
do so using /etc/rc.d/rc.local but if you know what you're doing (it's
easy), go ahead and and modify the inet2 startup script to load the /etc/
rc.d/rc.firewall-iptables file just after the network is up. If you want
a more detailed guide and/or a stronger firewall ruleset, I recommend you
check out Section 10 of TrinityOS found in the links section at the
bottom of this HOWTO.


Notes on how users might want to change the above firewall ruleset:

You could also have IP Masquerading enabled on a PER MACHINE basis instead of
the above method, which is enabling an ENTIRE TCP/IP network. For example,
say if I wanted only the 192.168.0.2 and 192.168.0.8 hosts to have access to
the Internet and NOT any of the other internal machines. I would change the
in the "Enable simple IP forwarding and Masquerading" section (shown above)
of the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-iptables ruleset.

+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|#!/bin/sh |
|# |
|# Partial IPTABLES config to enable simple IP forwarding and Masquerading |
|# v0.61 |
|# |
|# NOTE: The following is an example to allow only IP Masquerading for the |
|# 192.168.0.2 and 192.168.0.8 machines with a 255.255.255.0 or a |
|# "/24" subnet mask connecting to the Internet on interface eth0. |
|# |
|# ** Please change the network number, subnet mask, and the Internet |
|# ** connection interface name to match your internal LAN setup |
|# |
|echo " - Setting the default FORWARD policy to DROP" |
|$IPTABLES -P FORWARD DROP |
| |
|echo " - Enabling SNAT (IPMASQ) functionality on $EXTIF" |
|$IPTABLES -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o $EXTIF -s 192.168.0.2/32 -j MASQUERADE |
|$IPTABLES -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o $EXTIF -s 192.168.0.8/32 -j MASQUERADE |
| |
|echo " - Setting the FORWARD policy to 'DROP' all incoming / unrelated traffic" |
|$IPTABLES -A INPUT -i $EXTIF -m state --state NEW,INVALID -j DROP |
|$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -i $EXTIF -m state --state NEW,INVALID -j DROP |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Common mistakes:

It appears that a common mistake with new IP Masq users is to make the first
command simply the following:

+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|IPTABLES: |
|--------- |
|iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -j MASQUERADE |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Do NOT make your default policy MASQUERADING. Otherwise, someone can
manipulate their routing tables to tunnel straight back through your gateway,
using it to masquerade their OWN identity!

Again, you can add these lines to the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-iptables file,
one of the other rc files you prefer, or do it manually every time you need
IP Masquerade.

Please see Section 6.4.1 for a detailed guide on a strong IPTABLES ruleset
example. For additional details on IPTABLES usage, please refer to [http://
www.netfilter.org/] http://www.netfilter.org/ for the primary IPTABLES site.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

3.4.2. Configuring IP Masquerade on Linux 2.2.x Kernels

Please note that IPFWADM is no longer the firewall tool for manipulating IP
Masquerading rules for both the 2.1.x and 2.2.x kernels. These new kernels
now use the IPCHAINS toolkit. For a more detailed reason for this change,
please see Chapter 7.

Create the file /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipchains with the following initial
SIMPLE ruleset:


+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|#!/bin/sh |
|# |
|# rc.firewall-ipchains |
|# |
|# - Initial SIMPLE IP Masquerade test for 2.1.x and 2.2.x kernels |
|# using IPCHAINS. |
|# |
|# Once IP Masquerading has been tested, with this simple |
|# ruleset, it is highly recommended to use a stronger |
|# IPTABLES ruleset either given later in this HOWTO or |
|# from another reputable resource. |
| |
|FWVER="1.23" |
|# |
|# 1.23 - Added comments on why the default policy is ACCEPT |
|# 1.22 - ruleset now uses modprobe instead of insmod |
|# 1.21 - Added clarification that PPPoE users need to use |
|# "ppp0" instead of "eth0" for their external interface |
|# 1.20 - Updated the script to use environment vars |
|# 1.01 - Original version |
| |
| |
|echo -e "\n\nLoading simple rc.firewall-ipchains : version $FWVER..\n" |
| |
| |
|# The location of the ipchains and kernel module programs |
|# |
|# If your Linux distribution came with a copy of ipchains, |
|# most likely all the programs will be located in /sbin. If |
|# you manually compiled ipchains, the default location will |
|# be in /usr/local/sbin |
|# |
|# ** Please use the "whereis ipchains" command to figure out |
|# ** where your copy is and change the path below to reflect |
|# ** your setup |
|# |
|IPCHAINS=/sbin/ipchains |
|#IPTABLES=/usr/local/sbin/ipchains |
|DEPMOD=/sbin/depmod |
|MODPROBE=/sbin/modprobe |
| |
| |
|#Setting the EXTERNAL and INTERNAL interfaces for the network |
|# |
|# Each IP Masquerade network needs to have at least one |
|# external and one internal network. The external network |
|# is where the NATing will occur and the internal network |
|# should preferably be addressed with a RFC1918 private addressing |
|# scheme. |
|# |
|# For this example, "eth0" is external and "eth1" is internal" |
|# |
|# NOTE: If this doesnt EXACTLY fit your configuration, you must |
|# change the EXTIF or INTIF variables above. For example: |
|# |
|# If you are a PPPoE or analog modem user: |
|# |
|# EXTIF="ppp0" |
|# |
|# ** Please change this to reflect your specific configuration ** |
|# |
|EXTIF="eth0" |
|INTIF="eth1" |
|echo " External Interface: $EXTIF" |
|echo " Internal Interface: $INTIF" |
| |
| |
|# Network Address of the Internal Network |
|# |
|# This example rc.firewall-ipchains file uses the 192.168.0.0 network |
|# with a /24 or 255.255.255.0 netmask. |
|# |
|# ** Change this variable to reflect your specific setup ** |
|# |
|INTLAN="192.168.0.0/24" |
|echo -e " Internal Interface: $INTLAN\n" |
| |
| |
| |
|# Load all required IP MASQ modules |
|# |
|# NOTE: Only load the IP MASQ modules you need. All current IP MASQ modules |
|# are shown below but are commented out from loading. |
|echo " loading required IPMASQ kernel modules.." |
| |
|# Needed to initially load modules |
|# |
|$DEPMOD -a |
| |
|echo -en " Loading modules: " |
| |
|# Supports the proper masquerading of FTP file transfers using the PORT method |
|# |
|echo -en "FTP, " |
|$MODPROBE ip_masq_ftp |
| |
|# Supports the masquerading of RealAudio over UDP. Without this module, |
|# RealAudio WILL function but in TCP mode. This can cause a reduction |
|# in sound quality |
|# |
|#echo -en "RealAudio, " |
|$MODPROBE ip_masq_raudio |
| |
|# Supports the masquerading of IRC DCC file transfers |
|# |
|#echo -en "Irc, " |
|#$MODPROBE ip_masq_irc |
| |
| |
|# Supports the masquerading of Quake and QuakeWorld by default. This modules is |
|# for for multiple users behind the Linux MASQ server. If you are going to |
|# play Quake I, II, and III, use the second example. |
|# |
|# NOTE: If you get ERRORs loading the QUAKE module, you are running an old |
|# ----- kernel that has bugs in it. Please upgrade to the newest kernel. |
|# |
|#echo -en "Quake, " |
|#Quake I / QuakeWorld (ports 26000 and 27000) |
|#$MODPROBE ip_masq_quake |
|# |
|#Quake I/II/III / QuakeWorld (ports 26000, 27000, 27910, 27960) |
|#$MODPROBE ip_masq_quake 26000,27000,27910,27960 |
| |
| |
|# Supports the masquerading of the CuSeeme video conferencing software |
|# |
|#echo -en "CuSeeme, " |
|#$MODPROBE ip_masq_cuseeme |
| |
|#Supports the masquerading of the VDO-live video conferencing software |
|# |
|#echo -en "VdoLive " |
|#$MODPROBE ip_masq_vdolive |
| |
|echo ". Done loading modules." |
| |
| |
|#CRITICAL: Enable IP forwarding since it is disabled by default since |
|# |
|# Redhat Users: you may try changing the options in |
|# /etc/sysconfig/network from: |
|# |
|# FORWARD_IPV4=false |
|# to |
|# FORWARD_IPV4=true |
|# |
|echo " enabling forwarding.." |
|echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward |
| |
| |
|#CRITICAL: Enable automatic IP defragmenting since it is disabled by default |
|# in 2.2.x kernels. This used to be a compile-time option but the |
|# behavior was changed in 2.2.12 |
|# |
|echo " enabling AlwaysDefrag.." |
|echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_always_defrag |
| |
| |
|# Dynamic IP users: |
|# |
|# If you get your IP address dynamically from SLIP, PPP, or DHCP, enable this |
|# following option. This enables dynamic-ip address hacking in IP MASQ, |
|# making the life with Diald and similar programs much easier. |
|# |
|#echo " enabling DynamicAddr.." |
|#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_dynaddr |
| |
| |
|# Enable the LooseUDP patch which some Internet-based games require |
|# |
|# If you are trying to get an Internet game to work through your IP MASQ box, |
|# and you have set it up to the best of your ability without it working, try |
|# enabling this option (delete the "#" character). This option is disabled |
|# by default due to possible internal machine UDP port scanning |
|# vulnerabilities. |
|# |
|#echo " enabling LooseUDP.." |
|#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_masq_udp_dloose |
| |
| |
|#Clearing any previous configuration |
|# |
|# Unless specified, the defaults for INPUT and OUTPUT is ACCEPT |
|# The default for FORWARD is REJECT |
|# |
|# Isn't ACCEPT insecure? To some degree, YES, but this is our testing |
|# phase. Once we know that IPMASQ is working well, I recommend you run |
|# the rc.firewall-*-stronger rulesets which set the defaults to DROP but |
|# also include the critical additional rulesets to still let you connect to |
|# the IPMASQ server, etc. |
|# |
|echo " clearing any existing rules and setting default policy.." |
|$IPCHAINS -P input ACCEPT |
|$IPCHAINS -P output ACCEPT |
|$IPCHAINS -P forward REJECT |
|$IPCHAINS -F input |
|$IPCHAINS -F output |
|$IPCHAINS -F forward |
| |
| |
|# MASQ timeouts |
|# |
|# 2 hrs timeout for TCP session timeouts |
|# 10 sec timeout for traffic after the TCP/IP "FIN" packet is received |
|# 160 sec timeout for UDP traffic (Important for MASQ'ed ICQ users) |
|# |
|echo " setting default timers.." |
|$IPCHAINS -M -S 7200 10 160 |
| |
| |
|# DHCP: For people who receive their external IP address from either DHCP or |
|# BOOTP for connctions such as DSL or Cablemodem users, it is necessary |
|# to use the following before the deny command. |
|# |
|# This example is currently commented out. |
|# |
|# |
|#$IPCHAINS -A input -j ACCEPT -i $EXTIF -s 0/0 67 -d 0/0 68 -p udp |
| |
|# Enable simple IP forwarding and Masquerading |
|# |
|# NOTE: The following is an example for an internal LAN address in the |
|# 192.168.0.x network with a 255.255.255.0 or a "24" bit subnet mask |
|# connecting to the Internet on interface eth0. |
|# |
|# ** Please change this network number, subnet mask, and your Internet |
|# ** connection interface name to match your internal LAN setup |
|# |
|echo " enabling IPMASQ functionality on $EXTIF" |
|$IPCHAINS -P forward DENY |
|$IPCHAINS -A forward -i $EXTIF -s $INTLAN -j MASQ |
| |
|echo -e "\nrc.firewall-ipchains v$FWVER done.\n" |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+


Once you are finished with editing the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipchains
ruleset, make it executable by typing in chmod 700 /etc/rc.d/
rc.firewall-ipchains

Now that the firewall ruleset is ready, you need to let it run after every
reboot. You could either do this by running it by hand everytime (such a
pain) or add it to the boot scripts. We have covered two methods below:
Redhat (SyS-V style) and Slackware (BSD style)

1. Redhat and Redhat-derived distros:

* There are two ways to automatically load things in Redhat: /etc/rc.d/
rc.local or a init script in /etc/rc.d/init.d/. The first method is the
easiest but isn't doing things the Sys-V way. All you have to do is add
the line:

+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|echo "Loading the rc.firewall ruleset.." |
|/etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipchains |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

to the end of the /etc/rc.d/rc.local file and thats it (as described
earlier in the HOWTO).

The problem with this approach is that the firewall isn't executed until
the last stages of booting. The preferred approach is to have the
firewall loaded just after the networking subsystem is loaded. To do
this, copy the following file into the /etc/rc.d/init.d directory:


+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|#!/bin/sh |
|# |
|# chkconfig: 2345 11 89 |
|# |
|# description: Loads the rc.firewall-ipchains ruleset. |
|# |
|# processname: firewall-ipchains |
|# pidfile: /var/run/firewall.pid |
|# config: /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipchains |
|# probe: true |
| |
|# ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- |
|# v08/29/02 |
|# |
|# Part of the copyrighted and trademarked TrinityOS document. |
|# http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch |
|# |
|# Written and Maintained by David A. Ranch |
|# dranch@trinnet.net |
|# |
|# Updates |
|# ------- |
|# |
|# ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- |
| |
| |
|# Source function library. |
|. /etc/rc.d/init.d/functions |
| |
|# Check that networking is up. |
| |
|# This line no longer work with bash2 |
|#[ ${NETWORKING} = "no" ] && exit 0 |
|# This should be OK. |
|[ "XXXX${NETWORKING}" = "XXXXno" ] && exit 0 |
| |
|[ -x /sbin/ifconfig ] || exit 0 |
| |
|# The location of various iptables and other shell programs |
|# |
|# If your Linux distribution came with a copy of iptables, most |
|# likely it is located in /sbin. If you manually compiled |
|# iptables, the default location is in /usr/local/sbin |
|# |
|# ** Please use the "whereis iptables" command to figure out |
|# ** where your copy is and change the path below to reflect |
|# ** your setup |
|# |
|IPCHAINS=/sbin/ipchains |
| |
| |
|# See how we were called. |
|case "$1" in |
| start) |
| /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipchains |
| ;; |
| |
| stop) |
| echo -e "\nFlushing firewall and setting default policies to REJECT\n" |
| |
| $IPCHAINS -P input REJECT |
| $IPCHAINS -P output REJECT |
| $IPCHAINS -P forward REJECT |
| |
| $IPCHAINS -F input |
| $IPCHAINS -F output |
| $IPCHAINS -F forward |
| ;; |
| |
| restart) |
| $0 stop |
| $0 start |
| ;; |
| |
| status) |
| $IPCHAINS -L |
| ;; |
| |
| mlist) |
| $IPCHAINS -M -L |
| ;; |
| |
| *) |
| echo "Usage: firewall-ipchains {start|stop|status|mlist}" |
| exit 1 |
|esac |
| |
|exit 0 |
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+


With this script in place, all you need to do now is make it executable
and then make it load upon reboot. First, make it executable by running:
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|#Redhat-style |
|# |
|chmod 700 /etc/rc.d/init.d/firewall-ipchains |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
Now, make the ruleset load upon reboot:
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|#Redhat style |
|# |
|chkconfig --level=345 firewall-ipchains on |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
That's it! Now upon boot, the firewall will be loaded automatically. Just
to make sure, run the command to see that the firewall should start upon
reboot by running the command:
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|#Redhat style |
|# |
|chkconfig --list firewall-ipchains |
| |
|#The output should look like: |
|# |
|firewall-ipchains 0:off 1:off 2:off 3:on 4:on 5:on 6:off |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+


2. Slackware:

* There are two ways to load things in Slackware: /etc/rc.d/rc.local or
editing the /etc/rc.d/rc.inet2 file. The first method is the easiest but
isn't the most secure (see below). All you have to do is append the
following lines to the /etc/rc.d/rc.local file:

+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|echo "Loading the rc.firewall-ipchains ruleset.." |
|/etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipchains |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

The problem with this approach is that if you are running a STRONG
firewall ruleset, the firewall isn't executed until the last stages of
booting. The preferred approach is to have the firewall loaded just after
the networking subsystem is loaded. For now, the HOWTO only covers how to
do so using /etc/rc.d/rc.local but if you know what you're doing (it's
easy), go ahead and and modify the inet2 startup script to load the /etc/
rc.d/rc.firewall-ipchains file just after the network is up. If you want
a more detailed guide and/or a stronger firewall ruleset, I recommend you
check out Section 10 of TrinityOS found in the links section at the
bottom of this HOWTO.


Notes on how users might want to change the above firewall ruleset:

You could also have IP Masquerading enabled on a PER MACHINE basis instead of
the above method, which is enabling an ENTIRE TCP/IP network. For example,
say if I wanted only the 192.168.0.2 and 192.168.0.8 hosts to have access to
the Internet and NOT any of the other internal machines. I would change the
in the "Enable simple IP forwarding and Masquerading" section (shown above)
of the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipchains ruleset.

+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|#!/bin/sh |
|# |
|# Enable simple IP forwarding and Masquerading |
|# v1.01 |
|# |
|# NOTE: The following is an example used in addition to the simple |
|# IPCHAINS ruleset anove to allow only IP Masquerading for the |
|# 192.168.0.2 and 192.168.0.8 machines with a 255.255.255.0 or a |
|# "24" bit subnet mask connecting to the Internet on interface $EXTIF. |
|# |
|# ** Please change the network number, subnet mask, and the Internet |
|# ** connection interface name to match your internal LAN setup |
|# |
|$IPCHAINS -P forward DENY |
|$IPCHAINS -A forward -i $EXTIF -s 192.168.0.2/32 -j MASQ |
|$IPCHAINS -A forward -i $EXTIF -s 192.168.0.8/32 -j MASQ |
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Common mistakes:

What appears to be a common mistake with new IP MASQ users is to make the
first command:

+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|$IPCHAINS -P forward masquerade |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Do NOT make your default policy MASQUERADING. Otherwise, someone can
manipulate their routing tables to tunnel straight back through your gateway,
using it to masquerade their OWN identity!

Again, you can add these lines to the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipchains file,
one of the other rc files you prefer, or do it manually every time you need
IP Masquerade.

Please see Section 6.4.2 for a detailed guide on IPCHAINS and a strong
IPCHAINS ruleset example. For additional details on IPCHAINS usage, please
refer to [http://www.netfilter.org/ipchains/] http://www.netfilter.org/
ipchains/ for the primary IPCHAINS site or the [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/
IPCHAINS-HOWTO.html] Linux IP CHAINS HOWTO Backup site
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

3.4.3. Configuring IP Masquerade on Linux 2.0.x Kernels

Create the file /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipfwadm with the following initial
SIMPLE ruleset:
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|#!/bin/sh |
|# |
|# rc.firewall-ipfwadm |
|# |
|# A Initial SIMPLE IP Masquerade setup for 2.0.x kernels using IPFWADM |
|# |
|FWVER="2.03" |
|# |
|# 2.03 - Added comments on why the default policy is ACCEPT |
|# 2.02 - Added clarification that PPPoE users need to use |
|# "ppp0" instead of "eth0" for their external interface |
|# |
|# |
|# Once IP Masquerading has been tested, with this simple |
|# ruleset, it is highly recommended to use a stronger |
|# IPTABLES ruleset either given later in this HOWTO or |
|# from another reputable resource. |
|# |
|echo -e "\n\nLoading simple rc.firewall-ipfwadm version $FWVER..\n" |
| |
| |
|#Setting the EXTERNAL and INTERNAL interfaces for the network |
|# |
|# Each IP Masquerade network needs to have at least one |
|# external and one internal network. The external network |
|# is where the NATing will occur and the internal network |
|# should preferably be addressed with a RFC1918 private addressing |
|# scheme. |
|# |
|# For this example, "eth0" is external and "eth1" is internal" |
|# |
|# NOTE: If this doesnt EXACTLY fit your configuration, you must |
|# change the EXTIF or INTIF variables above. For example: |
|# |
|# If you are a PPPoE or analog modem user: |
|# |
|# EXTIF="ppp0" |
|# |
|# ** Please change this to reflect your specific configuration ** |
|# |
|EXTIF="eth0" |
|INTIF="eth1" |
|echo " External Interface: $EXTIF" |
|echo " Internal Interface: $INTIF" |
| |
| |
|# Network Address of the Internal Network |
|# |
|# This example rc.firewall-ipfwadm file uses the 192.168.0.0 network |
|# with a /24 or 255.255.255.0 netmask. |
|# |
|# ** Change this variable to reflect your specific setup ** |
|# |
|INTLAN="192.168.0.0/24" |
|echo -e " Internal Interface: $INTLAN\n" |
| |
| |
|# Load all required IP MASQ modules |
|# |
|# NOTE: Only load the IP MASQ modules you need. All current available IP |
|# MASQ modules are shown below but are commented out from loading. |
|echo -en "Loading modules: " |
| |
| |
|# Needed to initially load modules |
|# |
|/sbin/depmod -a |
| |
|# Supports the proper masquerading of FTP file transfers using the PORT method |
|# |
|echo -en "FTP, " |
|/sbin/modprobe ip_masq_ftp |
| |
|# Supports the masquerading of RealAudio over UDP. Without this module, |
|# RealAudio WILL function but in TCP mode. This can cause a reduction |
|# in sound quality |
|# |
|#echo -en "RealAudio, " |
|#/sbin/modprobe ip_masq_raudio |
| |
|# Supports the masquerading of IRC DCC file transfers |
|# |
|#echo -en "Irc, " |
|#/sbin/modprobe ip_masq_irc |
| |
|# Supports the masquerading of Quake and QuakeWorld by default. These modules |
|# are for multiple users behind the Linux MASQ server. If you are going to |
|# play Quake I, II, and III, use the second example. |
|# |
|# NOTE: If you get ERRORs loading the QUAKE module, you are running an old |
|# ----- kernel that has bugs in it. Please upgrade to the newest kernel. |
|# |
|#echo -en "Quake, " |
|#Quake I / QuakeWorld (ports 26000 and 27000) |
|#/sbin/modprobe ip_masq_quake |
|# |
|#Quake I/II/III / QuakeWorld (ports 26000, 27000, 27910, 27960) |
|#/sbin/modprobe ip_masq_quake 26000,27000,27910,27960 |
| |
|# Supports the masquerading of the CuSeeme video conferencing software |
|# |
|#echo -en "CuSeeme, " |
|#/sbin/modprobe ip_masq_cuseeme |
| |
|#Supports the masquerading of the VDO-live video conferencing software |
|# |
|#echo -en "VdoLive, " |
|#/sbin/modprobe ip_masq_vdolive |
| |
|echo ". Done loading modules." |
| |
| |
|#CRITICAL: Enable IP forwarding since it is disabled by default |
|# |
|# Redhat Users: you may try changing the options in |
|# /etc/sysconfig/network from: |
|# |
|# FORWARD_IPV4=false |
|# to |
|# FORWARD_IPV4=true |
|# |
|echo " enabling forwarding.." |
|echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward |
| |
| |
|#CRITICAL: Enable automatic IP defragmenting since it is disabled by default |
|# |
|# This used to be a compile-time option but the behavior was changed |
|# in 2.2.12. This option is required for both 2.0 and 2.2 kernels. |
|# |
|echo " enabling AlwaysDefrag.." |
|echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_always_defrag |
| |
| |
|# Dynamic IP users: |
|# |
|# If you get your Internet IP address dynamically from SLIP, PPP, or DHCP, |
|# enable the following option. This enables dynamic-ip address hacking in |
|# IP MASQ, making the life with DialD, PPPd, and similar programs much easier. |
|# |
|#echo " enabling DynamicAddr.." |
|#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_dynaddr |
| |
| |
|#Clearing any previous configuration |
|# |
|# Unless specified, the defaults for INPUT and OUTPUT is ACCEPT |
|# The default for FORWARD is REJECT |
|# |
|# Isn't ACCEPT insecure? To some degree, YES, but this is our testing |
|# phase. Once we know that IPMASQ is working well, I recommend you run |
|# the rc.firewall-*-stronger rulesets which set the defaults to DROP but |
|# also include the critical additional rulesets to still let you connect to |
|# the IPMASQ server, etc. |
|# |
|echo " clearing any existing rules and setting default policy.." |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -I -p accept |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -O -p accept |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -F -p reject |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -I -f |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -O -f |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -F -f |
| |
| |
|# MASQ timeouts |
|# |
|# 2 hrs timeout for TCP session timeouts |
|# 10 sec timeout for traffic after the TCP/IP "FIN" packet is received |
|# 160 sec timeout for UDP traffic (Important for MASQ'ed ICQ users) |
|# |
|echo " setting default timers.." |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -M -s 7200 10 160 |
| |
| |
|# DHCP: For people who receive their external IP address from either DHCP or |
|# BOOTP such as DSL or Cablemodem users, it is necessary to use the |
|# following before the deny command. |
|# |
|# This example is currently commented out. |
|# |
|# |
|#/sbin/ipfwadm -I -a accept -S 0/0 67 -D 0/0 68 -W $EXTIF -P udp |
| |
| |
|# Enable simple IP forwarding and Masquerading |
|# |
|# NOTE: The following is an example for an internal LAN address in the |
|# 192.168.0.x network with a 255.255.255.0 or a "24" bit subnet mask |
|# connecting to the Internet on interface eth0. |
|# |
|# ** Please change this network number, subnet mask, and your Internet |
|# ** connection interface name to match your internal LAN setup. |
|# |
|echo " enabling IPMASQ functionality on $EXTIF" |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -F -p deny |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -F -a m -W $EXTIF -S $INTLAN -D 0.0.0.0/0 |
| |
|echo -e "\nrc.firewall-ipfwadm v$FWVER done.\n" |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+


Once you are finished with editing the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipfwadm ruleset,
make it executable by typing in "chmod 700 /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipfwadm"

Now that the firewall ruleset is ready to go, you need to let it run after
every reboot. You could either do this by running it by hand everytime (such
a pain) or add it to the boot scripts. We have covered two methods below:
Redhat (SyS-V style) and Slackware (BSD style)

Redhat and Redhat-derived distros:

* There are two ways to automatically load things in Redhat: /etc/rc.d/
rc.local or a init script in /etc/rc.d/init.d/. The first method is the
easiest but isn't doing it the Sys-V way. All you have to do is add the
line:

+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|echo "Loading the rc.firewall-ipfwadm ruleset.." |
| |
|/etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipfwadm |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

The problem with this approach is that the firewall isn't executed until
the last stages of booting. The preferred approach is to have the
firewall loaded just after the networking subsystem is loaded. To do
this, copy the following file into the /etc/rc.d/init.d directory:


+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|#!/bin/sh |
|# |
|# chkconfig: 2345 11 89 |
|# |
|# description: Loads the rc.firewall-ipfwadm ruleset. |
|# |
|# processname: firewall-ipfwadm |
|# pidfile: /var/run/firewall.pid |
|# config: /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipfwadm |
|# probe: true |
| |
|# ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- |
|# v02/09/02 |
|# |
|# Part of the copyrighted and trademarked TrinityOS document. |
|# http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch |
|# |
|# Written and Maintained by David A. Ranch |
|# dranch@trinnet.net |
|# |
|# Updates |
|# ------- |
|# |
|# ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- |
| |
| |
|# Source function library. |
|. /etc/rc.d/init.d/functions |
| |
|# Check that networking is up. |
| |
|# This line no longer work with bash2 |
|#[ ${NETWORKING} = "no" ] && exit 0 |
|# This should be OK. |
|[ "XXXX${NETWORKING}" = "XXXXno" ] && exit 0 |
| |
|[ -x /sbin/ifconfig ] || exit 0 |
| |
|# The location of various iptables and other shell programs |
|# |
|# If your Linux distribution came with a copy of iptables, most |
|# likely it is located in /sbin. If you manually compiled |
|# iptables, the default location is in /usr/local/sbin |
|# |
|# ** Please use the "whereis iptables" command to figure out |
|# ** where your copy is and change the path below to reflect |
|# ** your setup |
|# |
|IPFWADM=/sbin/ipfwadm |
| |
| |
|# See how we were called. |
|case "$1" in |
| start) |
| /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipfwadm |
| ;; |
| |
| stop) |
| echo -e "\nFlushing firewall and setting default policies to REJECT\n" |
| |
| $IPFWADM -I -p REJECT |
| $IPFWADM -O -p REJECT |
| $IPFWADM -F -p REJECT |
| |
| $IPFWADM -I -f |
| $IPFWADM -O -f |
| $IPFWADM -F -f |
| ;; |
| |
| restart) |
| $0 stop |
| $0 start |
| ;; |
| |
| status) |
| $IPFWADM -l |
| ;; |
| |
| mlist) |
| $IPFWADM -M -l |
| ;; |
| |
| *) |
| echo "Usage: firewall-ipfwadm {start|stop|status|mlist}" |
| exit 1 |
|esac |
| |
|exit 0 |
+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------+


With this script in place, all you need to do now is make it executable
and then make it load upon reboot. First, make it executable by running:
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|#Redhat-style |
|# |
|chmod 700 /etc/rc.d/init.d/firewall-ipfwadm |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
Now, make the ruleset load upon reboot:
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|#Redhat style |
|# |
|chkconfig --level=345 firewall-ipfwadm on |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
That's it! Now upon boot, the firewall will be loaded automatically. Just
to make sure, run the command to see that the firewall should start upon
reboot by running the command:
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|#Redhat style |
|# |
|chkconfig --list firewall-ipfwadm |
| |
|#The output should look like: |
|# |
|firewall-ipfwadm 0:off 1:off 2:off 3:on 4:on 5:on 6:off |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+


Slackware:

* There are two ways to automatically load things in Slackware: /etc/rc.d/
rc.local or editing the /etc/rc.d/rc.inet2 file. The first method is the
easiest but isn't the most secure (see below). All you have to do is
append the following lines to the /etc/rc.d/rc.local file:

+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|echo "Loading the rc.firewall-ipfwadm ruleset.." |
| |
|/etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipfwadm |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

The problem with this approach is that if you are running a STRONG
firewall ruleset, the firewall isn't executed until the last stages of
booting. The preferred approach is to have the firewall loaded just after
the networking subsystem is loaded. For now, the HOWTO only covers how to
do so using /etc/rc.d/rc.local but if you know what you're doing (it's
easy), go ahead and and modify the inet2 startup script to load the /etc/
rc.d/rc.firewall-ipfwadm file just after the network is up. If you want a
more detailed guide and/or a stronger firewall ruleset, I recommend you
check out Section 10 of TrinityOS found in the links section at the
bottom of this HOWTO.


Notes on how users might want to change the above firewall ruleset:

You could have also enabled IP Masquerading on a PER MACHINE basis instead of
the above method enabling an ENTIRE TCP/IP network. For example, say if I
wanted only the 192.168.0.2 and 192.168.0.8 hosts to have access to the
Internet and NOT any of the other internal machines. I would change the in
the "Enable simple IP forwarding and Masquerading" section (shown above) of
the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipfwadm ruleset.

+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|# Enable simple IP forwarding and Masquerading |
|# v2.01 |
|# |
|# NOTE: The following is an example to only allow IP Masquerading for the |
|# 192.168.0.2 and 192.168.0.8 machines with a 255.255.255.0 or a "24" |
|# bit subnet mask connected to the Internet on interface eth0. |
|# |
|# ** Please change this network number, subnet mask, and your Internet |
|# ** connection interface name to match your internal LAN setup |
|# |
|# Please use the following in ADDITION to the simple rulesets above for |
|# specific MASQ networks. |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -F -p deny |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -F -a m -W $EXTIF -S 192.168.0.2/32 -D 0.0.0.0/0 |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -F -a m -W $EXTIF -S 192.168.0.8/32 -D 0.0.0.0/0 |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Common mistakes:

What appears to be a common mistake with new IP Masq users is to make the
first command:

+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|ipfwadm -F -p masquerade |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Do NOT make your default policy MASQUERADING. Otherwise, someone who has the
ability to manipulate their routing tables will be able to tunnel straight
back through your gateway, using it to masquerade their OWN identity!

Again, you can add these lines to the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipfwadm file, one
of the other rc files (if you prefer), or manually add those lines every time
you need IP Masquerade.

Please see Section 6.4.3 and Section 6.4.3for a detailed guide and stronger
examples of IPCHAINS and IPFWADM ruleset examples.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Chapter 4. Configuring the other internal to-be MASQed machines

Besides setting the appropriate IP address for each internal MASQed machine
(either statically or though DHCP), you should also set each internal machine
with the appropriate gateway IP address of the Linux MASQ server and required
DNS servers. In general, this is rather straight forward. You simply enter
the address of your Linux host (192.168.0.1 is used throughout this HOWTO) as
the machine's gateway address.

For the Domain Name Service (DNS), you add in any DNS servers that are
available to you to use. The most apparent one(s) should be the DNS servers
that your Linux server uses. You can optionally add any "domain search"
suffix as well for quicker connections, etc.

After you have properly reconfigured the internal MASQed machines, remember
to restart their appropriate network services or reboot them if need be.

The following configuration instructions assume that you are using a Class C
network with 192.168.0.1 as your Linux MASQ server's address. Please note
that 192.168.0.0 and 192.168.0.255 are reserved TCP/IP address per RFC1918
for uses just like enabling IP Masquerade services.

As it stands, the following Platforms have been tested as internal MASQed
machines. This is only an EXAMPLE of all compatible OSes out there:

* Apple Macintosh OS and OS-X (with MacTCP or Open Transport or the BSD TCP
/IP stack)

* AT&T Unix (Caldera)

* *BSD systems including Free/Net/Open/BSDi/386/etc.

* Commodore Amiga (with AmiTCP or AS225-stack)

* Digital VAX Stations 3520 and 3100 with UCX (TCP/IP stack for VMS)

* Digital Ultrix, Digital Unix (Compaq Tru/64)

* HP HP/UX

* IBM AIX running on RS/6000, PowerPC, etc.

* IBM OS/2 (including Warp v3)

* IBM OS400 running on a AS/400

* Linux distributions from vendors like Caldera, Corel, Debian, Mandrake,
Redhat, Slackware, SuSe, etc. running various kernels like 1.2.x, 1.3.x,
2.0.x, 2.1.x, 2.2.x, 2.3.x, 2.4.x, etc.

* Microsoft DOS (with NCSA Telnet package, DOS Trumpet works partially)

* Microsoft Windows 3.1 (with the Netmanage or FTP packages)

* Microsoft Windows For Workgroup 3.11 (with a TCP/IP package)

* Microsoft Windows 95, OSR2, 98, 98se, Me

* Microsoft Windows NT 3.51, 4.0, 2000, XP - (both workstation
(professional) and server versions)

* Novell Netware 4.01, 5.x, etc. with the TCP/IP service

* SCO Openserver (v3.2.4.2 and 5) and UnixWare (AT&T Unix)

* Sun Solaris 2.51, 2.6, 7, 8

* heheh.. what else am I missing?


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
4.1. Configuring Microsoft Windows 95 and OSR2

1. ** Please note that some prompts might be different based upon the build
version of Windows95 you are running **

If you haven't installed your network card and adapter driver, do so now.
Descriptions to perform this step is beyond the scope of this document
and though it is fairly simple, if you haven't done this before, please
seek assitance.

2. Go to the 'Control Panel' --> 'Network'.

3. Click on Add --> Protocol --> Manufacture: Microsoft --> Protocol: 'TCP/
IP protocol' if you don't already have it installed.

4. Highlight the TCP/IP item bound to your correct Windows95 network card
e.g. (TCP/IP --> Intel EtherExpress Pro/100+) and select 'Properties'.
Here, you have two options: configure a static address or use DHCP.
Static addresses are simple but require that you NEVER configure
duplication IPs on different machines. The alternative is DHCP which
automatically configures all DHCP-enabled workstations things like IP
addresses, DNS servers, etc. from a central server (typically the Linux
MASQ server).

DHCP enabled:

To use DHCP, simply click on the "Use DHCP to assign addresses" button.
Please note that configuring a DHCP server is beyond the scope of this
HOWTO but it is fully covered in TrinityOS and other Linux HOWTOs.

Static Addresses:

Now goto the 'IP Address' tab and set IP Address to 192.168.0.x, (1 < x <
255), and set the Subnet Mask to 255.255.255.0

5. Now select the "Gateway" tab and add 192.168.0.1 as your gateway under
'Gateway' and hit "Add".

6. Under the 'DNS Configuration' tab, make sure to put enter in a name for
this machine and specify your official domain name. If you don't have
your own domain, enter in the domain of your ISP. Next, you need to
specify the DNS servers you plan on using.

DHCP: No entries are required as this is configured dynamically via DHCP.

STATIC: Add all of the DNS servers that your Linux MASQ server uses
(usually found in /etc/resolv.conf). Usually these DNS servers are
located at your ISP though you could be running either your own Caching
or Authoritative DNS server on your Linux MASQ server as well. Again,
setting up DNS services is beyond the scope of this HOWTO but it is
covered by TrinityOS as well as the LDP's DNS HOWTO.

Optionally, you can add any appropriate domain search suffixes as well.
This allows users to simply type in the hostname of the destination
computer instead of the fully qualified domain name (FQDN). This is
similar to the PATH function for finding common Unix commands.

7. Leave all of the other settings alone as they are unless (even dangerous)
if you don't know what you're doing.

8. Click 'OK' in all dialog boxes and restart your system.

9. As an initial test, Ping the Linux MASQ server to test the network
connection: 'Start/Run', type: ping 192.168.0.1(This is only an INTERNAL
LAN connection test, you might not be able to ping the outside world
yet.) If you don't see "replies" to your PINGs, please verify your
network configuration.

10. You can optionally create a HOSTS file in the C:\Windows directory so
that you can ping the "hostname" of the machines on your LAN without the
need for a DNS server. There is an example called HOSTS.SAM in the C:\
windows directory for an example.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
4.2. Configuring Windows NT



1. If you haven't installed your network card and adapter driver, do so now.
Descriptions to perform this task is beyond the scope of this document.

2. Go to 'Control Panel' --> 'Network' --> Protocols

3. Add the TCP/IP Protocol and related Components from the 'Add Software'
menu if you don't have TCP/IP service installed already.

4. Under 'Network Software and Adapter Cards' section, highlight the 'TCP/IP
Protocol' in the 'Installed Network Software' selection box.

5. In 'TCP/IP Configuration', select the appropriate adapter, e.g. [1]Intel
EtherExpress Pro/100+. Then set the IP Address to 192.168.0.x (1 < x <
255), then set the Subnet Mask to 255.255.255.0 and Default Gateway to
192.168.0.1.

6. Do not enable any of the following options (unless you know what you are
doing):

+ 'Automatic DHCP Configuration' : Unless you have a DHCP server
running on your network.

+ Put anything in the 'WINS Server' input areas : Unless you have setup
one or more WINS servers.

+ Enable IP Forwardings : Unless you are routing on your NT machine and
really -REALLY- know EXACTLY what you're doing.


7. Click 'DNS', fill in the appropriate information that your Linux host
uses (usually found in /etc/resolv.conf) and then click 'OK' when you're
done.

8. Click 'Advanced', be sure to DISABLE 'DNS for Windows Name Resolution'
and 'Enable LMHOSTS lookup' unless you known what these options do. If
you want to use a LMHOSTS file, it is stored in C:\winnt\system32\drivers
\etc.

9. Click 'OK' on all dialog boxes and restart the system.

10. As an initial test, ping the Linux MASQ server to test the network
connection: 'File/Run', type: ping 192.168.0.1(This is only an INTERNAL
LAN connection test, you you might not be able to ping the outside world
yet.) If you don't see any "replies" to your PINGs, please verify your
network configuration.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

4.3. Configuring Windows for Workgroup 3.11



1. If you haven't installed your network card and adapter driver, do so now.
Descriptions to perform this task is beyond the scope of this document.

2. Install the TCP/IP 32b package if you haven't already.

3. In 'Main'/'Windows Setup'/'Network Setup', click on 'Drivers'.

4. Highlight 'Microsoft TCP/IP-32 3.11b' in the 'Network Drivers' section,
click 'Setup'.

5. Set the IP Address to 192.168.0.x (1 < x < 255), then set the Subnet Mask
to 255.255.255.0 and Default Gateway to 192.168.0.1

6. Do not enable any of the following options (unless you know what you are
doing):

+ 'Automatic DHCP Configuration' : Unless you have a DHCP server
running on your network.

+ Put anything in the 'WINS Server' input areas : Unless you have setup
one or more WINS servers.


7. Click 'DNS', fill in the appropriate information your Linux host uses
(usually found in /etc/resolv.conf). Then click 'OK' when you're done
with it.

8. Click 'Advanced', check 'Enable DNS for Windows Name Resolution' and
'Enable LMHOSTS lookup' found in c:\windows.

9. Click 'OK' in all dialog boxes and restart the system.

10. As an initial test, ping the linux box to test the network connection:
'File/Run', type: ping 192.168.0.1 (This is only an INTERNAL LAN
connection test so you might not be able to ping the outside world yet.)
If you don't see "replies" to your PINGs, please verify your network
configuration.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
4.4. Configuring UNIX Based Systems



1. If you haven't installed your network card and either re-configured the
network subsystem or recompiled your kernel with the appropriate adapter
driver, do so now. Descriptions to perform this task is beyond the scope
of this document but are covered in the Networking HOWTO.

2. Install TCP/IP networking, such as the net-tools package, if you don't
have it already.

3. Set IPADDR to 192.168.0.x (1 < x < 255), then set NETMASK to
255.255.255.0, GATEWAY to 192.168.0.1, and BROADCAST to 192.168.0.255.

+ Redhat (Mandrake / TurboLinux / etc): You can edit the /etc/sysconfig
/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0 file, or simply do so through the Control
Panel (Linuxconf).

+ Slackware: You need to edit the /etc/rc.d/rc.inet1 file to configure
the network subsystem.

+ To Add: Debian, Suse, Caldera, etc. Please email dranch@trinnet.net
if you can tell me what distro uses what files to configure the
networking subsystem.


Beyond this, most Linux distributions use significantly different network
configuration mechanisms let alone other UNIXes such as SunOS, BSDi,
Solaris, AIX, TruUnix, FreeBSD, etc.). Please refer to your specific UNIX
documentation for more details.

4. Add your domain name service (DNS) and domain search suffix in /etc/
resolv.conf and for the appropreiate UNIX versions, edit the /etc/
nsswitch.conf file to enable DNS services.

5. You may also want to update your /etc/networks file depending on your
version of UNIX and the system's settings.

6. Restart the appropriate services, or simply restart your system.

7. As an initial test, run the ping command: ping 192.168.0.1 to test the
connection to your gateway machine. (This is only an INTERNAL LAN
connection test, so you might not be able to ping the outside world yet.)
If you don't see "replies" to your PINGs, please verify your network
configuration.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

4.5. Configuring DOS using NCSA Telnet package



1. If you haven't installed your network card, do so now. Descriptions to
perform this task is beyond the scope of this document.

2. Load the appropriate packet driver. For example: an NE2000 Ethernet card
set for I/O port 300 and IRQ 10, would need to be issued nwpd 0x60 10
0x300

3. Make a new directory, and then unpack the NCSA Telnet package: pkunzip
tel2308b.zip

4. Use a text editor to open the config.tel file

5. Set myip=192.168.0.x (1 < x < 255), and netmask=255.255.255.0

6. In this example, you should set hardware=packet, interrupt=10, ioaddr=60

7. You should have at least one individual machine specified as the gateway,
i.e. the Linux host:

+---------------------------------------------------------------+
| name=default |
| host=yourlinuxhostname |
| hostip=192.168.0.1 |
| gateway=1 |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

8. Have another specified as a domain name service:

+---------------------------------------------------------------+
| name=dns.domain.com ; hostip=123.123.123.123; nameserver=1|
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

Note: substitute the appropriate information about the DNS according what
your Linux host uses

9. Save your config.tel file

10. As an initial test, ping the Linux MASQ server to test the network
connection: ping 192.168.0.1 If you don't receive any replies, please
verify your network configuration.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

4.6. Configuring MacOS Based System Running MacTCP

1. If you haven't installed the appropriate driver software for your
Ethernet adapter, do so now. Descriptions to perform this task is beyond
the scope of this document.

2. Open the MacTCP control panel. Select the appropriate network driver
(Ethernet, NOT EtherTalk) and click on the 'More...' button.

3. Under 'Obtain Address:', click 'Manually'.

4. Under 'IP Address:', select class C from the popup menu. Ignore the rest
of the dialog box sections.

5. Fill in the appropriate information under 'Domain Name Server
Information:'.

6. Under 'Gateway Address:', enter 192.168.0.1

7. Click 'OK' to save the settings. In the main window of the MacTCP control
panel, enter the IP address of your Mac (192.168.0.x, 1 < x < 255) in the
'IP Address:' box.

8. Close the MacTCP control panel. If a dialog box pops up, notifying you to
do so, then restart the system.

9. You may optionally ping the Linux box to test the network connection. If
you have the freeware program MacTCP Watcher , click on the 'Ping'
button, and enter the address of your Linux box (192.168.0.1) in the
dialog window that pops up. (This is only an INTERNAL LAN connection
test, you can't ping the outside world yet.) If you don't see "replies"
to your PINGs, please verify your network configuration.

10. You can optionally create a Hosts file in your System Folder so that you
can use the hostnames of the machines on your LAN. The file should
already exist in your System Folder, and should contain some
(commented-out) sample entries which you can modify according to your
needs.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

4.7. Configuring MacOS Based System Running Open Transport



1. If you haven't installed the appropriate driver software for your
Ethernet adapter, do so now. Descriptions to perform this task is beyond
the scope of this document.

2. Open the TCP/IP Control Panel and choose 'User Mode ...' from the Edit
menu. Make sure the user mode is set to at least 'Advanced' and click the
'OK' button.

3. Choose 'Configurations...' from the File menu. Select your 'Default'
configuration and click the 'Duplicate...' button. Enter 'IP Masq' (or
something to let you know that this is a special configuration) in the
'Duplicate Configuration' dialog, it will probably say something like
'Default copy'. Then click the 'OK' button, and the 'Make Active' button

4. Select 'Ethernet' from the 'Connect via:' pop-up.

5. Select the appropriate item from the 'Configure:' pop-up. If you don't
know which option to choose, you probably should re-select your 'Default'
configuration and quit. I use 'Manually'.

6. Enter the IP address of your Mac (192.168.0.x, 1 < x < 255) in the 'IP
Address:' box.

7. Enter 255.255.255.0 in the 'Subnet mask:' box.

8. Enter 192.168.0.1 in the 'Router address:' box.

9. Enter the IP addresses of your domain name servers in the 'Name server
addr.:' box.

10. Enter the name of your Internet domain (e.g. 'microsoft.com') in the
'Starting domain name' box under 'Implicit Search Path:'.

11. The following procedures are optional. Incorrect values may cause erratic
behavior. If you're not sure, it's probably better to leave them blank,
unchecked and/or un-selected. Remove any information from those fields,
if necessary. As far as I know, there is no way to use the TCP/IP dialogs
to tell the system not to use a previously selected alternate "Hosts"
file. If you know, I would be interested.

Check the '802.3' if your network requires 802.3 frame types.

12. Click the 'Options...' button to make sure that the TCP/IP is active. I
use the 'Load only when needed' option. If you continuously run and quit
TCP/IP applications without rebooting your machine, you may find that
unchecking the 'Load only when needed' option will prevent/reduce the
effects on your machine's memory management. With the item unchecked, the
TCP/IP protocol stacks are always loaded and available for use. If
checked, the TCP/IP stacks are automatically loaded when needed and
un-loaded when not. It's the loading and unloading process that can cause
your machine's memory to become fragmented.

13. You may ping the Linux box to test the network connection. If you have
the freeware program MacTCP Watcher, click on the 'Ping' button, and
enter the address of your Linux box (192.168.0.1) in the dialog box that
pops up. (This is only an INTERNAL LAN connection test, you can't ping
the outside world yet.) If you don't see "replies" to your PINGs, please
verify your network configuration.

14. You can optionally create a Hosts file in your System Folder so that you
can use the hostnames of the machines on your LAN. The file may or may
not already exist in your System Folder. If so, it should contain some
(commented-out) sample entries which you can modify according to your
needs. If not, you can get a copy of the file from a system running
MacTCP, or just create your own (it follows a subset of the Unix /etc/
hosts file format, described on RFC1035). Once you've created the file,
open the TCP/IP control panel, click on the 'Select Hosts File...'
button, and open the Hosts file.

15. Click the close box or choose 'Close' or 'Quit' from the File menu, and
then click the 'Save' button to save the changes you have made.

16. The changes take effect immediately, but rebooting the system won't hurt.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

4.8. Configuring Novell network using DNS



1. If you haven't installed the appropriate driver software for your
Ethernet adapter, do so now. Descriptions to perform this task is beyond
the scope of this document.

2. Downloaded tcpip16.exe from The Novell LanWorkPlace page

3. +---------------------------------------------------------------+
|edit c:\nwclient\startnet.bat: (here is a copy of mine) |
|SET NWLANGUAGE=ENGLISH |
|LH LSL.COM |
|LH KTC2000.COM |
|LH IPXODI.COM |
|LH tcpip |
|LH VLM.EXE |
|F: |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

4. +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|edit c:\nwclient\net.cfg: (change link driver to yours i.e. NE2000) |
|Link Driver KTC2000 |
| Protocol IPX 0 ETHERNET_802.3 |
| Frame ETHERNET_802.3 |
| Frame Ethernet_II |
| FRAME Ethernet_802.2 |
| |
|NetWare DOS Requester |
| FIRST NETWORK DRIVE = F |
| USE DEFAULTS = OFF |
| VLM = CONN.VLM |
| VLM = IPXNCP.VLM |
| VLM = TRAN.VLM |
| VLM = SECURITY.VLM |
| VLM = NDS.VLM |
| VLM = BIND.VLM |
| VLM = NWP.VLM |
| VLM = FIO.VLM |
| VLM = GENERAL.VLM |
| VLM = REDIR.VLM |
| VLM = PRINT.VLM |
| VLM = NETX.VLM |
| |
|Link Support |
| Buffers 8 1500 |
| MemPool 4096 |
| |
|Protocol TCPIP |
| PATH SCRIPT C:\NET\SCRIPT |
| PATH PROFILE C:\NET\PROFILE |
| PATH LWP_CFG C:\NET\HSTACC |
| PATH TCP_CFG C:\NET\TCP |
| ip_address 192.168.0.xxx |
| ip_router 192.168.0.1 |
| |
| |
|Change the IP address in the above "ip_address" field (192.168.0.x, 1 < x |
|< 255) and finally create c:\bin\resolv.cfg: |
| |
|SEARCH DNS HOSTS SEQUENTIAL |
|NAMESERVER xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx |
|NAMESERVER yyy.yyy.yyy.yyy |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

5. Now edit the above "NAMESERVER" entries and replace them with the correct
IP addresses for your local DNS server.

6. Issue a ping command: ping 192.168.0.1 to test the connection to your
gateway machine. (This is only an INTERNAL LAN connection test, you can't
ping the outside world yet.) If you don't see "replies" to your PINGs,
please verify your network configuration.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

4.9. Configuring OS/2 Warp



1. If you haven't installed the appropriate driver software for your
Ethernet adapter, do so now. Descriptions to perform this task is beyond
the scope of this document.

2. Install the TCP/IP protocol if you don't have it already.

3. Go to Programs/TCP/IP (LAN) / TCP/IP Settings

4. In 'Network', add your TCP/IP Address (192.168.0.x) and set your netmask
(255.255.255.0)

5. Under 'Routing', press 'Add'. Set the Type to 'default' and type the IP
Address of your Linux Box in the Field 'Router Address'. (192.168.0.1).

6. Set the same DNS (Nameserver) Address that your Linux host uses in
'Hosts'.

7. Close the TCP/IP control panel. Say yes to the following question(s).

8. Reboot your system

9. You may ping the Linux box to test the network configuration. Type 'ping
192.168.0.1' in a 'OS/2 Command prompt Window'. When ping packets are
received all is ok.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

4.10. Configuring OS/400 on a IBM AS/400

The descriptions to configure TCP/IP on OS/400 version V4R1M0 running on a AS
/400 is beyond the scope of this document.

1) To perform any communications configuration tasks on your AS/400, you must
have the special authority of *IOSYSCFG (I/O System Configuration) defined in
your user profile. You can check the characteristics of your user profile
with the DSPUSRPRF command.

2) Type GO CFGTCP command th reach the Configure TCP/IP menu.

3) Select Option 2 - Work with TCP/IP Routes.

4) Enter a 1 on the Opt field to add a route. * In Route Destination type *
DFTROUTE * In Subnet Mask type *NONE * In Type of Service type *NORMAL * In
Nex Hop type the address of your gataway (the Linux box)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

4.11. Configuring Other Systems

The same logic should apply to setting up other platforms. Consult the
sections above. If you're interested in writing about any of systems that
have not been covered yet, please send a detail setup instruction to [mailto:
ambrose@writeme.com] ambrose@writeme.com and [mailto:dranch@trinnet.net]
dranch@trinnet.net.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Chapter 5. Testing IP Masquerade

Finally, it's time to give IP Masquerading an official try after all this
hard work. If you haven't already rebooted your Linux box, do so to make sure
the machines boots ok, executes the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-* ruleset, etc.
Next, make sure that both the internal LAN connection and connection of your
Linux hosts to the Internet is okay.

Follow these -11- tests to make sure all aspects of your MASQ setup is
running properly:
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

5.1. Loading up the rc.firewall ruleset

Step One: run the correct firewall for your machine via command "/etc/rc.d/
rc.firewall-[iptables / ipchains /ipfwadm]". For example, Linux 2.6 users
would run "/etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-iptables"

Does it load with some strange errors? Here are some exmaples and help to fix
them:

* Problem #1:


+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|ip_tables, Using /lib/modules/2.4.2-2/kernel/net/ipv4/netfilter/ip_tables.o |
|/lib/modules/2.4.2-2/kernel/net/ipv4/netfilter/ip_tables.o: init_module: Device |
|or resource busy |
|Hint: insmod errors can be caused by incorrect module parameters, including |
|invalid IO or IRQ parameters |
| |
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Run the command "/sbin/lsmod" and make sure the module "ipchains.o" is
NOT installed. If it is installed, your machine (most likely Redhat-7.x
based) is probably trying to load an IPCHAINS ruleset which is
incompatible with IPTABLES.

To disable this from happening in the future, run the command:
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
| chkconfig --level=2345 ipchains off |
| |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

To remove the "ipchains" module without rebooting, run the command:
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
| /sbin/rmmod ipchains |
| |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
and the re-try to load the rc.firewall-* ruleset.

* Problem #2:

+---------------------------------------------------------------+
| . |
| . |
| Creating a DROP chain.. |
| iptables v1.2.3: log-level `info' ambiguous |
| . |
| . |
| |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

Your version of IPTABLES it too old. You need to upgrade it with a newer
version via an updated RPM, DEB, or via compiling up the source. You can
get an updated version from your Linux distribution manufacturer or from
the NetFilter WWW site. This is all covered in the Section 2.6 section.

* Problem #3:

+---------------------------------------------------------------+
| No such file: |
| |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

Did you copy this rc.firewall-* file from a DOS machine? Load the
rc.firewall-* file in a binary editor such as ViM (vim -b /etc/rc.d/
rc.firewall-*) and make sure that every line is NOT finished with a ^M.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
5.2. Testing internal MASQ client PC connectivity

* Step Two: Testing internal MASQ client PC connectivity

From an internal MASQed computer, try pinging its local IP address (i.e.
ping 192.168.0.10 ). This will verify that TCP/IP is correctly working on
the local machine. Almost ALL modern operating systems have built-in
support for the "ping" command. If this ping doesn't work, make sure that
TCP/IP is correctly configured on the MASQed PC as described earlier in
Chapter 4 of this HOWTO. The output should look something like the
following (hit Control-C to abort the ping):

------------------------------------
masq-client# ping 192.168.0.10
PING 192.168.0.10 (192.168.0.10): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 192.168.0.10: icmp_seq=0 ttl=255 time=0.8 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.0.10: icmp_seq=1 ttl=255 time=0.4 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.0.10: icmp_seq=2 ttl=255 time=0.4 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.0.10: icmp_seq=3 ttl=255 time=0.5 ms
^C

--- 192.168.0.10 ping statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 4 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max = 0.4/0.5/0.8 ms
------------------------------------


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
5.3. Testing internal MASQ client to MASQ server connectivity

* Step Three: Testing internal MASQ client to MASQ server connectivity

Next, from the same internal MASQed computer, try pinging the the IP
address of the Linux MASQ server's INTERNAL interface (i.e. ping
192.168.0.1 ). This will verify that TCP/IP is correctly working on both
the local and Linux MASQ machine. Almost ALL modern operating systems
have built-in support for the "ping" command. If this ping doesn't work,
make sure that TCP/IP is correctly configured on the MASQed Server as
described by the various Network HOWTOs (URLs can be found in the
requirements section for your 2.4.x kernel in Section 2.6, 2.2.x kernel
in Section 2.7, or 2.0.x kernel in Section 2.8). The output should look
something like the following (hit Control-C to abort the ping):

------------------------------------
masq-client# ping 192.168.0.1
PING 192.168.0.1 (192.168.0.1): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 192.168.0.1: icmp_seq=0 ttl=255 time=0.8 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.0.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=255 time=0.4 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.0.1: icmp_seq=2 ttl=255 time=0.4 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.0.1: icmp_seq=3 ttl=255 time=0.5 ms
^C

--- 192.168.0.1 ping statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 4 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max = 0.4/0.5/0.8 ms
------------------------------------

If the ping failed, check the network connection between the MASQ server
and the PC. If it's a DIRECT Ethernet connection (no hub or switch), you
MUST have a "Ethernet cross-over cable". These cables are common and can
be found at any computer store. Without this cable, the NICs (network
cards) will not give you a "LINK" light. If you are using a hub or
switch, make sure the ports connected to the MASQ server and MASQed
client machine have a LINK light. If they do and the pings STILL don't
work or there is a lot of packet loss, try different ports on the hub/
switch (it not all that uncommon to have hub/switch ports die). Finally,
if things still don't work perfectly, try replacing each of the NICs in
the machines. You would be surprised how many people I've helped have
found that their NIC cards were going bad and caused them all kinds of
grief.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

5.4. Testing internal MASQ server connectivity

* Step Four: Testing internal MASQ server connectivity

On the MASQ server, ping the internal IP address of the MASQ server's
network interface card (i.e. ping 192.168.0.1). If this ping doesn't
work, make sure that TCP/IP is correctly configured on the MASQed Server
as described by the various Network HOWTOs (URLs can be found in the
requirements section for your 2.4.x kernel in Section 2.6, 2.2.x kernel
in Section 2.7, or 2.0.x kernel in Section 2.8). The output should look
something like the following (hit Control-C to abort the ping):

--------------------------------------
masq-server# ping 192.168.0.1
PING 192.168.0.1 (192.168.0.1): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 192.168.0.1: icmp_seq=0 ttl=255 time=0.8 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.0.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=255 time=0.4 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.0.1: icmp_seq=2 ttl=255 time=0.4 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.0.1: icmp_seq=3 ttl=255 time=0.5 ms
^C

--- 192.168.0.1 ping statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 4 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max = 0.4/0.5/0.8 ms
---------------------------------------


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
5.5. Testing internal MASQ server to MASQ client connectivity

* Step Five: Testing internal MASQ server to MASQ client connectivity

Next from MASQed server, try pinging the IP address of one of the
internal MASQ client computers (i.e. ping 192.168.0.10 ). This will
verify that TCP/IP is correctly working on both the local server machine
and on the MASQ client machine. If this ping doesn't work, make sure that
TCP/IP is correctly configured on the MASQed PC as described earlier in
Chapter 4 of this HOWTO. Also be sure that the cabling is correct
(Ethernet: the NICs connecting the internal MASQ PC and the MASQ server
have the "link" light lit up). If the ping does work, the output should
look something like the following (hit Control-C to abort the ping):

------------------------------------
masq-server# ping 192.168.0.10
PING 192.168.0.10 (192.168.0.10): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 192.168.0.10: icmp_seq=0 ttl=255 time=0.8 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.0.10: icmp_seq=1 ttl=255 time=0.4 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.0.10: icmp_seq=2 ttl=255 time=0.4 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.0.10: icmp_seq=3 ttl=255 time=0.5 ms
^C

--- 192.168.0.10 ping statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 4 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max = 0.4/0.5/0.8 ms
------------------------------------


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
5.6. Testing External MASQ server Internet connectivity

* Step Six: Testing external MASQ server to Internet connectivity

From the MASQ server, ping the external IP address of the MASQ server's
EXTERNAL network interface that is connected to the Internet. This
address might be a Ethernet interface, a PPP interface, etc. connection
to your ISP. If you don't know what this external IP address is, run the
Linux command "/sbin/ifconfig" on the MASQ server itself to get the
Internet address. The output should look something like the following (we
are looking for the IP address of eth0):

------------------------------------
eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:08:C7:A4:CC:5B
inet addr:12.13.14.15 Bcast:12.13.14.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:6108459 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:5422798 errors:8 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:8
collisions:4675 txqueuelen:100
Interrupt:11 Base address:0xfcf0
------------------------------------

As you can see from the above, the external IP address is "12.13.14.15"
for this example. So, now that you have your IP address after running the
"ipconfig" command, ping your external IP address. This will confirm that
the MASQ server has full network connectivity. The output should look
something like the following (hit Control-C to abort the ping):

-------------------------------------
masq-server# ping 12.13.14.15
PING 12.13.14.15 (12.13.14.15): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 12.13.14.15: icmp_seq=0 ttl=255 time=0.8 ms
64 bytes from 12.13.14.15: icmp_seq=1 ttl=255 time=0.4 ms
64 bytes from 12.13.14.15: icmp_seq=2 ttl=255 time=0.4 ms
64 bytes from 12.13.14.15: icmp_seq=3 ttl=255 time=0.5 ms
^C

--- 12.13.14.15 ping statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 4 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max = 0.4/0.5/0.8 ms
-------------------------------------

If either of these tests doesn't work, you need to go back and double
check your network cabling and verify that the two network interfaces on
the MASQ server are seen in "dmesg". An example of this output would be
the following towards the END of the "dmesg" command:

-------------------------------------
.
.
PPP: version 2.3.7 (demand dialling)
TCP compression code copyright 1989 Regents of the University of California
PPP line discipline registered.
3c59x.c:v0.99H 11/17/98 Donald Becker
http://cesdis.gsfc.nasa.gov/linux/drivers/
vortex.html
eth0: 3Com 3c905 Boomerang 100baseTx at 0xfe80, 00:60:08:a7:4e:0e, IRQ 9
8K word-wide RAM 3:5 Rx:Tx split, autoselect/MII interface.
MII transceiver found at address 24, status 786f.
Enabling bus-master transmits and whole-frame receives.
eth1: 3Com 3c905 Boomerang 100baseTx at 0xfd80, 00:60:97:92:69:f8, IRQ 9
8K word-wide RAM 3:5 Rx:Tx split, autoselect/MII interface.
MII transceiver found at address 24, status 7849.
Enabling bus-master transmits and whole-frame receives.
Partition check:
sda: sda1 sda2 < sda5 sda6 sda7 sda8 >
sdb:
.
.
-------------------------------------

Also be sure that the cabling is correct (Ethernet: the NICs connecting
the external MASQ server to your ISP has the "link" light lit up).
Finally, make sure that TCP/IP is correctly configured on the MASQed
Server as described by the various Network HOWTOs (URLs can be found in
the requirements section for your 2.4.x kernel in Section 2.6, 2.2.x
kernel in Section 2.7, or 2.0.x kernel in Section 2.8).


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
5.7. Testing internal MASQ client to external MASQ server connectivity



* Step Seven: Testing internal MASQ client to external MASQ server
connectivity

From an internal MASQed computer, ping the IP address of the MASQ
server's EXTERNAL TCP/IP address obtained in Step FIVE above. This
address could be from your Ethernet, PPP, etc. interface which is
ultimately the address connected to your ISP. This ping test will prove
that Linux masquerading (ICMP Masquerading specifically) and IP
forwarding is working.

If everthing thing is working correctly, the output should look something
like the following (hit Control-C to abort the ping):

-------------------------------------
masq-client# ping 12.13.14.15
PING 12.13.14.15 (12.13.14.15): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 12.13.14.15: icmp_seq=0 ttl=255 time=0.8 ms
64 bytes from 12.13.14.15: icmp_seq=1 ttl=255 time=0.4 ms
64 bytes from 12.13.14.15: icmp_seq=2 ttl=255 time=0.4 ms
64 bytes from 12.13.14.15: icmp_seq=3 ttl=255 time=0.5 ms
^C

--- 12.13.14.15 ping statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 4 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max = 0.4/0.5/0.8 ms
-------------------------------------

If this test doesn't work, first make sure that the "Default Gateway" on
the MASQed PC is pointing to the IP address on the MASQ -SERVERs-
INTERNAL NIC. Also double check that the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-* script
was run without any errors. Just as a test, try re-running the /etc/rc.d/
rc.firewall-* script now to see if it runs OK. Also, though most kernels
support it by default, make sure that you enabled "ICMP Masquerading" in
the kernel comfiguration and "IP Forwarding" in your /etc/rc.d/
rc.firewall-* script.

If you still can't get things to work, take a look at the output from the
following commands run on the Linux MASQ SERVER:

+ "ifconfig" : Make sure the interface for your Internet connection (be
it ppp0, eth0, etc.) is UP and you have the correct IP address for
the Internet connection. An example of this output is shown in STEP
FIVE above.

+ "netstat -rn" : Make sure your default gateway (the column with an IP
address in the Gateway column) is set. An example of this output
might look like:
-------------------------------------
masq-server# netstat -rn
Kernel IP routing table
Destination Gateway Genmask Flags MSS Window irtt Iface
192.168.0.1 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 UH 0 16384 0 eth1
12.13.14.15 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255 UH 0 16384 0 eth0
12.13.14.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0 eth0
192.168.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0 eth1
127.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 U 0 16384 0 lo
0.0.0.0 12.13.14.1 0.0.0.0 UG 0 16384 0 eth0
-------------------------------------
Notice the very LAST line that starts with 0.0.0.0? Notice that it
also has an IP address in the "Gateway" field? You should specify an
IP address for your specific setup in that field (this is typically
done automatically when your Internet connection is enabled).

+ "cat /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward" : Make sure it says "1" so that
Linux forwarding is enabled

+ Run the command "/sbin/ipchains -n -L" for 2.2.x users or "/sbin/
ipfwadm -F -l" for 2.0.x users. Specifically, look for the FORWARDing
section to make sure you have MASQ enabled. An example of an IPCHAINS
output might look like for users using the SIMPLE rc.firewall-*
ruleset:
------------------------------------
.
.
Chain forward (policy REJECT):
target prot opt source destination ports
MASQ all ------ 192.168.0.0/24 0.0.0.0/0 n/a
ACCEPT all ----l- 0.0.0.0/0 0.0.0.0/0 n/a
.
.
------------------------------------





-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

5.8. Testing external MASQ ICMP forwarding



* Step Eight: Testing external MASQ ICMP forwarding

From an internal MASQed computer, ping a static TCP/IP address (NOT a
machine by DNS name) out on the Internet (i.e. ping 152.2.210.80 (this
technically the DNS name "metalab.unc.edu" which is home of MetaLabs'
Linux Archive). If this works, it should look something like the result
below and this ultimately shows that ICMP Masquerading is working
properly. (hit Control-C to abort the ping):

-------------------------------------
masq-client# ping 152.2.210.80

PING 12.13.14.15 (152.2.210.80): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 152.2.210.80: icmp_seq=0 ttl=255 time=133.4 ms
64 bytes from 152.2.210.80: icmp_seq=1 ttl=255 time=132.5 ms
64 bytes from 152.2.210.80: icmp_seq=2 ttl=255 time=128.8 ms
64 bytes from 152.2.210.80: icmp_seq=3 ttl=255 time=132.2 ms
^C

--- 152.2.210.80 ping statistics ---
4 packets transmitted, 4 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max = 128.8/131.7/133.4 ms
-------------------------------------

If this didn't work, again check your Internet connection. Make sure that
the MASQ server itself can ping this address. If this works from the MASQ
server, make sure you are using the simple rc.firewall-* ruleset and that
you have ICMP Masqurading compiled into the Linux kernel.

Finally, make sure that the ruleset which enables IP MASQ is pointing to
the correct EXTERNAL interface. PPPoE users should use the MASQ servers's
logical PPP interface such as "ppp0" and /NOT/ the physical external
interface like "eth0".



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

5.9. Testing MASQ functionality without DNS



* Step Nine: Testing MASQ functionality without DNS

Now try TELNETing to a remote IP address (i.e. telnet 152.2.210.81 ( this
is technically the DNS name "metalab.unc.edu"). It might take a few
seconds to get a login prompt since this is a VERY busy server. Did you
get a login prompt like shown below? If so, it means that TCP
Masquerading is running OK. If not, try TELNETing to some other hosts you
think will support TELNET like 198.182.196.55 (www.linux.org). If this
still doesn't work, make sure you are using the simple rc.firewall-*
ruleset for this test. An example of this output might look like (hit
Control-D to exit out of the TELNET):
--------------------------------
masq-client# telnet 152.2.210.80
Trying 152.2.210.80...
Connected to 152.2.210.80.
Escape character is '^]'.


SunOS 5.7


******************** Welcome to MetaLab.unc.edu *******************

To login to MetaLab as a user, connect to login.metalab.unc.edu.
This machine does not allow public telnet logins.

login: Connection closed by foreign host.
--------------------------------



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

5.10. Testing MASQ functionality with DNS resolution



* Step Ten: Testing MASQ functionality with DNS resolution

Now try TELNETing to a remote machine by DNS name (i.e. "telnet
metalab.unc.edu" (IP address 152.2.210.81). If this works, the output
should look like something below. With this test, this shows that
UDP-based DNS is working fine.

--------------------------------
masq-client# telnet MetaLab.unc.edu
Trying 152.2.210.80...
Connected to 152.2.210.80.
Escape character is '^]'.


SunOS 5.7


******************** Welcome to MetaLab.unc.edu *******************

To login to MetaLab as a user, connect to login.metalab.unc.edu.
This machine does not allow public telnet logins.

login: Connection closed by foreign host.
--------------------------------

If this did not work, but Step EIGHT did work, make sure that you have
one or more valid DNS servers configured on each of the MASQ CLIENT
computer(s) as shown in Chapter 4. Please note that these DNS servers
will typically be your ISP's DNS servers and NOT your local MASQ server.
Some people might later choose to setup their OWN DNS servers but this is
beyond the scope of this HOWTO.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

5.11. Testing more MASQ functionality with DNS



* Step Eleven: Testing more MASQ functionality with DNS

As a last test, try browsing some 'INTERNET' WWW sites on one of your
MASQ Client machines, and see if you can reach them. For example, access
the Linux Documentation Project site at [http://www.tldp.org] http://
www.tldp.org. If you are successful in bringing up that page, you can be
fairly certain that everything is working FINE! If some WWW or FTP sites
have problems, where other sites seem to work just fine, see the next
step for more ideas.

If you see The Linux Documentation Project homepage, then
CONGRATULATIONS! It's working! If the WWW site comes up correctly, then
all other standard network tools such as PING, TELNET, SSH, and with
their related IP MASQ modules loaded: FTP, Real Audio, IRC DCCs, Quake I/
II/III, CuSeeme, VDOLive, etc. should work fine too! If FTP, IRC,
RealAudio, Quake I/II/III, etc. aren't working or are performing poorly,
verify that their associated Masquerading modules are loaded by running
"lsmod" and also be sure you are loading the module with any non-default
server ports. If you don't see your needed module, make sure your /etc/
rc.d/rc.firewall-* script is loading them (i.e. remove the # character
for a given IP MASQ module).



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

5.12. Any remaining functional, performance, etc. issues...



* Step Twelve: Any remaining functional, performance, etc. issues...

If your system passes all of the above tests, but functionality tests
like WWW browsing, FTP, and other types of traffic aren't reliable or are
slow, I recommend that you read the FAQ section of this HOWTO..
specifically the Section 7.15 FAQ entry. There might be other items in
the FAQ section that will also help you as they have helped many other
users in the past.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Chapter 6. Other IP Masquerade Issues and Software Support

6.1. Problems with IP Masquerade

Some TCP/IP application protocols will not currently work with Linux IP
Masquerading because they either assume things about port numbers or encode
TCP/IP addresses and/or port numbers in their data stream. These latter
protocols need specific proxies or IP MASQ modules built into the
masquerading code to make them work.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

6.2. Incoming services

By default, Linux IP Masquerading cannot handle incoming services at all but
there are a few ways that would allow this.

If you do not require high levels of security, then you can simply forward or
redirect IP ports. There are various ways to perform this, though the most
stable method is to use IPPORTFW. For more information, please see Section
6.7.

If you wish to have some level of authorization on incoming connections, then
you will need to either configure TCP-wrappers or Xinetd to allow only
specific IP addresses to pass. The TIS Firewall Toolkit is a good place to
look for tools and information.

More details on incoming security can be found in the [http://
www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/index-linux.html#TrinityOS] TrinityOS
document and at IP Masquerade Resource.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

6.3. Supported Client Software and Other Setup Notes

"** The Linux Masquerade Application list has a lot of good information
regarding applications that work through Linux IP masquerading. This site was
recently taken over by Steve Grevemeyer, who implemented it with a full
database backend. It's a great resource! "

Generally, any application that uses standard TCP and UDP should work. If you
have any suggestion, hints, etc., please see the [http://ipmasq.webhop.net/]
IP Masquerade Resource for more details.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

6.3.1. Network Clients that -Work- with IP Masquerade

General Clients:

Archie
all supported platforms, file searching client (not all archie clients
are supported)

FTP
all supported platforms, with the ip_masq_ftp.o kernel module for active
FTP connections.

Gopher client
all supported platforms

HTTP
all supported platforms, WWW surfing

IRC
all IRC clients on various supported platforms, DCC is supported via the
ip_masq_irc.o module

NNTP (USENET)
all supported platforms, USENET news client

PING
all platforms, with ICMP Masquerading kernel option

POP3
all supported platforms, email clients

SSH
all supported platforms, Secure TELNET/FTP clients

SMTP
all supported platforms, email servers like Sendmail, Qmail, PostFix,
etc.

TELNET
all supported platforms, remote session

TRACEROUTE
UNIX and Windows based platforms, some variations may not work

VRML
Windows(possibly all supported platforms), virtual reality surfing

WAIS client
all supported platforms


Multimedia and Communication Clients:



All H.323 programs
- MS Netmeeting, Intel Internet Phone Beta , and other H.323 applications
- There are now two solutions to accomplish this through IPMASQed
connections:

There is a stable BETA 2.2.x kernel module available on the [http://
ipmasq.webhop.net] MASQ WWW site or at [http://www.coritel.it/projects/
nat/implementation.htm] http://www.coritel.it/projects/nat/
implementation.htm to work with Microsoft Netmeeting v3.x code on 2.2.x
kernels. There is also another module version on the MASQ WWW site
specifically for Netmeeting 2.x with 2.0.x kernels, but this does not
support Netmeeting v3.x.

Another commercial solution is the Equivalence's PhonePatch H.323
gateway.


Alpha Worlds
Windows, Client-Server 3D chat program

CU-SeeMe
all supported platforms, with the ip_masq_cuseeme module loaded, please
see Section 6.8 for more details.

ICQ
all supported clients. Requires the Linux kernel to be either compiled
with PORTFW support, have the ip_masq_icq module (2.2.x and 2.0.x only),
or have a SOCKS proxy running. A full description of this configuration
is in Section 6.9.

Internet Phone 3.2
Windows, Peer-to-peer audio communications, users can reach you only if
you initiate the call, but those users cannot call you without a specific
port forwarding setup. See Section 6.7for more details.

Internet Wave Player
Windows, network streaming audio

Powwow
Windows, Peer-to-peer Text audio whiteboard communications, users can
reach you only if you initiate the call, but those users cannot call you
without a specific port forwarding setup. See Section 6.7for more
details.

Real Audio Player
Windows, network streaming audio, higher quality available with the
ip_masq_raudio UDP module

True Speech Player 1.1b
Windows, network streaming audio

VDOLive
Windows, with the ip_masq_vdolive patch

Worlds Chat 0.9a
Windows, Client-Server 3D chat program


Games - See Section 6.10for more details on the LooseUDP patch

Battle.net
Works but requires TCP ports 116, 118 and UDP port 6112 IPPORTFWed to the
client game machine. See Section 6.7for more details. Please note that
FSGS and Bnetd servers still require IPPORTFW because they have not been
re-written to be NAT-friendly.

BattleZone 1.4
Works with LooseUDP patch and new NAT-friendly -- email [mailto:
dranch@trinnet.net] David Ranch for the .DLLs from Activision

Dark Reign 1.4
Works with LooseUDP patch or requires TCP ports 116 and 118 and UDP port
6112 IPPORTFWed to the game machine. See Section 6.7for more details.

Diablo
Works with LooseUDP patch or requires TCP ports 116 and 118 and UDP port
6112 IPPORTFWed to the game machine. Newer versions of Diablo use only
TCP port 6112 and UDP port 6112. See Section 6.7for more details.

Heavy Gear 2
Works with LooseUDP patch or requires TCP ports 116 and 118 and UDP port
6112 IPPORTFWed to the game machine. See Section 6.7for more details.

Quake I/II/III
Works right out of the box but requires the ip_masq_quake module if there
are more than one Quake I/II/III player behind a MASQ box. Also, this
module only supports Quake I and QuakeWorld by default. If you need to
support Quake II or non-default server ports, please see the module
install section of Section 3.4.3 and Section 3.4.2 rulesets.

StarCraft
Works with the LooseUDP patch, IPPORTFWing TCP, and UDP ports 6112 to the
internal MASQed game machine. See Section 6.7for more details.

WorldCraft
Works with LooseUDP patch


Other Clients:

Linux net-acct package
Linux, network administration-account package

NCSA Telnet 2.3.08
DOS, a suite containing telnet, ftp, ping, etc.

PC-anywhere for Windows
MS-Windows remotely controls a PC over TCP/IP, but only works if it is a
client, but not a host without a specific port forwarding setup. See
Section 6.7for more details.

Socket Watch
uses NTP - network time protocol


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
6.3.2. Clients that do not have full support in IP MASQ:

Intel Streaming Media Viewer Beta 1
Cannot connect to server

Netscape CoolTalk
Cannot connect to opposite side

WebPhone
Cannot work at present (it makes invalid assumptions about addresses).


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
6.4. Stronger firewall rulesets to run after initial testing

6.4.1. Stronger IP Firewall (IPTABLES) rulesets


+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|#!/bin/sh |
|# |
|# rc.firewall-iptables-stronger |
|# |
|FWVER=0.88s |
| |
|# An example of a stronger IPTABLES firewall with IP Masquerade |
|# support for 2.4.x kernels. |
|# |
|# Log: |
|# |
|# 0.88s - Updated the commands for dynamically addresses machines and |
|# to point to an expanded FAQ section for more information |
|# |
|# 0.87s - Removed the unused drop-and-logit chain as it was only later |
|# being deleted anyway |
|# 0.86s - Fixed a typo that had a preceeding ; instead of a # |
|# 0.85s - renamed from rc.firewall-2.4-stronger to rc.firewall-iptables- |
|# stronger to reflect this script works for all IPTABLES enabled |
|# platforms including 2.6.x kernels |
|# - fixed an incorrect /24 netmask for the INTIP variable |
|# - removed the unneeded SED variable |
|# 0.84s - Changed the defaults from 192.168.1.0 to 192.168.0.x to align |
|# with the rest of the IPMASQ howto |
|# 0.83s - Added additional comments to make PORTFW configs more obvious |
|# 0.82s - Added a special ICMP filter to work around a Netfilter security |
|# issue |
|# - renamed the drop-and-log-it rule to reject-and-log-it |
|# 0.81s - Added an additional comment in the INPUT section for NOT |
|# allowing all traffic in, but only select traffic |
|# 0.80s - Added a DISABLED ip_nat_irc kernel module section, changed the |
|# default of the ip_conntrack_irc to NOT load by default, and |
|# added additional kernel module comments |
|# 0.79s - ruleset now uses modprobe instead of insmod |
|# 0.78s - REJECT is not a legal policy yet; back to DROP |
|# 0.77s - Changed the default block behavior to REJECT not DROP |
|# 0.76s - Added a comment about the OPTIONAL WWW ruleset and a comment |
|# where to put optional PORTFW commands |
|# 0.75s - Added clarification that PPPoE users need to use |
|# "ppp0" instead of "eth0" for their external interface |
|# 0.74s - Changed the EXTIP command to work on NON-English distros |
|# 0.73s - Added comments in the output section that DHCPd is optional |
|# and changed the default settings to disabled |
|# 0.72s - Changed the filter from the INTNET to the INTIP to be |
|# stateful; moved the command VARs to the top and made the |
|# rest of the script to use them |
|# 0.70s - Added a disabled examples for allowing internal DHCP |
|# and external WWW access to the server |
|# 0.63s - Added support for the IRC module |
|# 0.62s - Initial version based upon the basic 2.4.x rc.firewall |
| |
| |
|echo -e "\nLoading rc.firewall-iptables-STRONGER - version $FWVER..\n" |
| |
| |
|# The location of various iptables and other shell programs |
|# |
|# If your Linux distribution came with a copy of iptables, most |
|# likely it is located in /sbin. If you manually compiled |
|# iptables, the default location is in /usr/local/sbin |
|# |
|# ** Please use the "whereis iptables" command to figure out |
|# ** where your copy is and change the path below to reflect |
|# ** your setup |
|# |
|#IPTABLES=/sbin/iptables |
|IPTABLES=/usr/local/sbin/iptables |
|# |
|LSMOD=/sbin/lsmod |
|DEPMOD=/sbin/depmod |
|MODPROBE=/sbin/modprobe |
|GREP=/bin/grep |
|AWK=/bin/awk |
|IFCONFIG=/sbin/ifconfig |
| |
| |
|#Setting the EXTERNAL and INTERNAL interfaces for the network |
|# |
|# Each IP Masquerade network needs to have at least one |
|# external and one internal network. The external network |
|# is where the natting will occur and the internal network |
|# should preferably be addressed with a RFC1918 private address |
|# scheme. |
|# |
|# For this example, "eth0" is external and "eth1" is internal" |
|# |
|# NOTE: If this doesnt EXACTLY fit your configuration, you must |
|# change the EXTIF or INTIF variables above. For example: |
|# |
|# If you are a PPPoE or analog modem user: |
|# |
|# EXTIF="ppp0" |
|# |
|EXTIF="eth0" |
|INTIF="eth1" |
|echo " External Interface: $EXTIF" |
|echo " Internal Interface: $INTIF" |
|echo " ---" |
| |
|# Specify your Static IP address here or let the script take care of it |
|# for you. |
|# |
|# If you prefer to use STATIC addresses in your firewalls, un-# out the |
|# static example below and # out the dynamic line. If you don't care, |
|# just leave this section alone. |
|# |
|# If you have a DYNAMIC IP address, the ruleset already takes care of |
|# this for you. Please note that the different single and double quote |
|# characters and the script MATTER. |
|# |
|# |
|# PPP and DHCP (Cablemodem and DSL ) users: |
|# ----------------------------------------- |
|# PPP: If you get your TCP/IP address via DHCP, **you will need ** to |
|# enable the # #ed out command below underneath the PPP section AND |
|# replace the word "eth0" with the name of your EXTERNAL Internet |
|# connection (ppp0, ippp0, etc) on the lines for "ppp-ip" and "extip". |
|# |
|# DHCP and PPP users: The remote DHCP or PPP server can and will change |
|# IP addresses on you over time. To deal with this, users should configure |
|# their DHCP or PPP client to re-run the rc.firewall-* ruleset everytime |
|# the IP address is changed. Please see the "masq-and-dyn-addr" FAQ entry |
|# in the IPMASQ howto for full details on how to do this. |
|# |
|# |
|# Determine the external IP automatically: |
|# ---------------------------------------- |
|# |
|# The following line will determine your external IP address. This |
|# line is somewhat complex and confusing but it will also work for |
|# all NON-English Linux distributions: |
|# |
|EXTIP="`$IFCONFIG $EXTIF | $AWK \ |
| /$EXTIF/'{next}//{split($0,a,":");split(a[2],a," ");print a[1];exit}'`" |
| |
| |
|# For users who wish to use STATIC IP addresses: |
|# |
|# # out the EXTIP line above and un-# out the EXTIP line below |
|# |
|#EXTIP="your.static.PPP.address" |
|echo " External IP: $EXTIP" |
|echo " ---" |
| |
| |
|# Assign the internal TCP/IP network and IP address |
|INTNET="192.168.0.0/24" |
|INTIP="192.168.0.1/32" |
|echo " Internal Network: $INTNET" |
|echo " Internal IP: $INTIP" |
|echo " ---" |
| |
| |
| |
| |
|# Setting a few other local variables |
|# |
|UNIVERSE="0.0.0.0/0" |
| |
|#====================================================================== |
|#== No editing beyond this line is required for initial MASQ testing == |
| |
|# Need to verify that all modules have all required dependencies |
|# |
|echo " - Verifying that all kernel modules are ok" |
|$DEPMOD -a |
| |
|echo -en " Loading kernel modules: " |
| |
|# With the new IPTABLES code, the core MASQ functionality is now either |
|# modular or compiled into the kernel. This HOWTO shows ALL IPTABLES |
|# options as MODULES. If your kernel is compiled correctly, there is |
|# NO need to load the kernel modules manually. |
|# |
|# NOTE: The following items are listed ONLY for informational reasons. |
|# There is no reason to manual load these modules unless your |
|# kernel is either mis-configured or you intentionally disabled |
|# the kernel module autoloader. |
|# |
| |
|# Upon the commands of starting up IP Masq on the server, the |
|# following kernel modules will be automatically loaded: |
|# |
|# NOTE: Only load the IP MASQ modules you need. All current IP MASQ |
|# modules are shown below but are commented out from loading. |
|# =============================================================== |
| |
|#Load the main body of the IPTABLES module - "ip_tables" |
|# - Loaded automatically when the "iptables" command is invoked |
|# |
|# - Loaded manually to clean up kernel auto-loading timing issues |
|# |
|echo -en "ip_tables, " |
|# |
|#Verify the module isn't loaded. If it is, skip it |
|# |
|if [ -z "` $LSMOD | $GREP ip_tables | $AWK {'print $1'} `" ]; then |
| $MODPROBE ip_tables |
|fi |
| |
| |
|#Load the IPTABLES filtering module - "iptable_filter" |
|# |
|# - Loaded automatically when filter policies are activated |
| |
| |
|#Load the stateful connection tracking framework - "ip_conntrack" |
|# |
|# The conntrack module in itself does nothing without other specific |
|# conntrack modules being loaded afterwards such as the "ip_conntrack_ftp" |
|# module |
|# |
|# - This module is loaded automatically when MASQ functionality is |
|# enabled |
|# |
|# - Loaded manually to clean up kernel auto-loading timing issues |
|# |
|echo -en "ip_conntrack, " |
|# |
|#Verify the module isn't loaded. If it is, skip it |
|# |
|if [ -z "` $LSMOD | $GREP ip_conntrack | $AWK {'print $1'} `" ]; then |
| $MODPROBE ip_conntrack |
|fi |
| |
| |
|#Load the FTP tracking mechanism for full FTP tracking |
|# |
|# Enabled by default -- insert a "#" on the next line to deactivate |
|# |
|echo -e "ip_conntrack_ftp, " |
|# |
|#Verify the module isn't loaded. If it is, skip it |
|# |
|if [ -z "` $LSMOD | $GREP ip_conntrack_ftp | $AWK {'print $1'} `" ]; then |
| $MODPROBE ip_conntrack_ftp |
|fi |
| |
| |
|#Load the IRC tracking mechanism for full IRC tracking |
|# |
|# Disabled by default -- insert a "#" on the next few lines to activate |
|# |
|# echo -en " ip_conntrack_irc, " |
|# |
|#Verify the module isn't loaded. If it is, skip it |
|# |
|# if [ -z "` $LSMOD | $GREP ip_conntrack_irc | $AWK {'print $1'} `" ]; then |
|# $MODPROBE ip_conntrack_irc |
|# fi |
| |
| |
|#Load the general IPTABLES NAT code - "iptable_nat" |
|# - Loaded automatically when MASQ functionality is turned on |
|# |
|# - Loaded manually to clean up kernel auto-loading timing issues |
|# |
|echo -en "iptable_nat, " |
|# |
|#Verify the module isn't loaded. If it is, skip it |
|# |
|if [ -z "` $LSMOD | $GREP iptable_nat | $AWK {'print $1'} `" ]; then |
| $MODPROBE iptable_nat |
|fi |
| |
| |
|#Loads the FTP NAT functionality into the core IPTABLES code |
|# Required to support non-PASV FTP. |
|# |
|# Enabled by default -- insert a "#" on the next line to deactivate |
|# |
|echo -e "ip_nat_ftp" |
|# |
|#Verify the module isn't loaded. If it is, skip it |
|# |
|if [ -z "` $LSMOD | $GREP ip_nat_ftp | $AWK {'print $1'} `" ]; then |
| $MODPROBE ip_nat_ftp |
|fi |
| |
| |
|#Loads the IRC NAT functionality (for DCC) into the core IPTABLES code |
|# |
|# DISABLED by default -- delete the "#" on the next few lines to activate |
|# |
|# echo -e "ip_nat_irc" |
|# |
|#Verify the module isn't loaded. If it is, skip it |
|# |
|# if [ -z "` $LSMOD | $GREP ip_nat_irc | $AWK {'print $1'} `" ]; then |
|# $MODPROBE ip_nat_irc |
|# fi |
| |
| |
|echo " ---" |
| |
|# Just to be complete, here is a partial list of some of the other |
|# IPTABLES kernel modules and their function. Please note that most |
|# of these modules (the ipt ones) are automatically loaded by the |
|# master kernel module for proper operation and don't need to be |
|# manually loaded. |
|# -------------------------------------------------------------------- |
|# |
|# ip_nat_snmp_basic - this module allows for proper NATing of some |
|# SNMP traffic |
|# |
|# iptable_mangle - this target allows for packets to be |
|# manipulated for things like the TCPMSS |
|# option, etc. |
|# |
|# -- |
|# |
|# ipt_mark - this target marks a given packet for future action. |
|# This automatically loads the ipt_MARK module |
|# |
|# ipt_tcpmss - this target allows to manipulate the TCP MSS |
|# option for braindead remote firewalls. |
|# This automatically loads the ipt_TCPMSS module |
|# |
|# ipt_limit - this target allows for packets to be limited to |
|# to many hits per sec/min/hr |
|# |
|# ipt_multiport - this match allows for targets within a range |
|# of port numbers vs. listing each port individually |
|# |
|# ipt_state - this match allows to catch packets with various |
|# IP and TCP flags set/unset |
|# |
|# ipt_unclean - this match allows to catch packets that have invalid |
|# IP/TCP flags set |
|# |
|# iptable_filter - this module allows for packets to be DROPped, |
|# REJECTed, or LOGged. This module automatically |
|# loads the following modules: |
|# |
|# ipt_LOG - this target allows for packets to be |
|# logged |
|# |
|# ipt_REJECT - this target DROPs the packet and returns |
|# a configurable ICMP packet back to the |
|# sender. |
| |
| |
|#CRITICAL: Enable IP forwarding since it is disabled by default since |
|# |
|# Redhat Users: you may try changing the options in |
|# /etc/sysconfig/network from: |
|# |
|# FORWARD_IPV4=false |
|# to |
|# FORWARD_IPV4=true |
|# |
|echo " Enabling forwarding.." |
|echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward |
| |
| |
|# Dynamic IP users: |
|# |
|# If you get your IP address dynamically from SLIP, PPP, or DHCP, |
|# enable the following option. This enables dynamic-address hacking |
|# which makes the life with Diald and similar programs much easier. |
|# |
|echo " Enabling DynamicAddr.." |
|echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_dynaddr |
| |
|echo " ---" |
| |
|############################################################################# |
|# |
|# Enable Stronger IP forwarding and Masquerading |
|# |
|# NOTE: In IPTABLES speak, IP Masquerading is a form of SourceNAT or SNAT. |
|# |
|# NOTE #2: The following is an example for an internal LAN address in the |
|# 192.168.0.x network with a 255.255.255.0 or a "24" bit subnet |
|# mask connecting to the Internet on external interface "eth0". |
|# This example will MASQ internal traffic out to the Internet |
|# but not allow non-initiated traffic into your internal network. |
|# |
|# |
|# ** Please change the above network numbers, subnet mask, and your |
|# |
| |
|#Clearing any previous configuration |
|# |
|# Unless specified, the defaults for INPUT, OUTPUT, and FORWARD to DROP |
|# |
|# You CANNOT change this to REJECT as it isn't a vaild policy setting. |
|# If you want REJECT, you must explictly REJECT at the end of a giving |
|# INPUT, OUTPUT, or FORWARD chain |
|# |
|echo " Clearing any existing rules and setting default policy to DROP.." |
|$IPTABLES -P INPUT DROP |
|$IPTABLES -F INPUT |
|$IPTABLES -P OUTPUT DROP |
|$IPTABLES -F OUTPUT |
|$IPTABLES -P FORWARD DROP |
|$IPTABLES -F FORWARD |
|$IPTABLES -F -t nat |
| |
|#Not needed and it will only load the unneeded kernel module |
|# |
|#$IPTABLES -F -t mangle |
| |
| |
|# Delete all User-specified chains |
|$IPTABLES -X |
| |
| |
|# Reset all IPTABLES counters |
|$IPTABLES -Z |
| |
| |
|#Configuring specific CHAINS for later use in the ruleset |
|# |
|# NOTE: Some users prefer to have their firewall silently |
|# "DROP" packets while others prefer to use "REJECT" |
|# to send ICMP error messages back to the remote |
|# machine. The default is "REJECT" but feel free to |
|# change this below. |
|# |
|# NOTE: Without the --log-level set to "info", every single |
|# firewall hit will goto ALL vtys. This is a very big |
|# pain. |
|# |
|echo " Creating a DROP chain.." |
|$IPTABLES -N reject-and-log-it |
|$IPTABLES -A reject-and-log-it -j LOG --log-level info |
|$IPTABLES -A reject-and-log-it -j REJECT |
| |
|echo -e "\n - Loading INPUT rulesets" |
| |
| |
|####################################################################### |
|# INPUT: Incoming traffic from various interfaces. All rulesets are |
|# already flushed and set to a default policy of DROP. |
|# |
| |
|# loopback interfaces are valid. |
|# |
|$IPTABLES -A INPUT -i lo -s $UNIVERSE -d $UNIVERSE -j ACCEPT |
| |
| |
|# local interface, local machines, going anywhere is valid |
|# |
|$IPTABLES -A INPUT -i $INTIF -s $INTNET -d $UNIVERSE -j ACCEPT |
| |
| |
|# remote interface, claiming to be local machines, IP spoofing, get lost |
|# |
|$IPTABLES -A INPUT -i $EXTIF -s $INTNET -d $UNIVERSE -j reject-and-log-it |
| |
| |
|# external interface, from any source, for ICMP traffic is valid |
|# |
|# If you would like your machine to "ping" from the Internet, |
|# enable this next line |
|# |
|#$IPTABLES -A INPUT -i $EXTIF -p ICMP -s $UNIVERSE -d $EXTIP -j ACCEPT |
| |
| |
|# remote interface, any source, going to the MASQ servers IP address is valid |
|# |
|# ENABLE this line if you want ALL Internet traffic to connect to your |
|# the various servers running on the MASQ server. This includes |
|# web servers, ssh servers, dns servers, etc. |
|# |
|# I DON'T recommend you enable this rule. Instead, only enable specific |
|# access to select server ports under the "OPTIONAL INPUT Section". |
|# An example of enabling HTTP (WWW) has been given below: |
|# |
|# |
|#$IPTABLES -A INPUT -i $EXTIF -s $UNIVERSE -d $EXTIP -j ACCEPT |
| |
| |
|# Allow any related traffic coming back to the MASQ server in. |
|# |
|# STATEFULLY TRACKED |
|# |
|$IPTABLES -A INPUT -i $EXTIF -s $UNIVERSE -d $EXTIP -m state --state \ |
| ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT |
| |
| |
|# ----- Begin OPTIONAL INPUT Section ----- |
|# |
| |
|# DHCPd - Enable the following lines if you run an INTERNAL DHCPd server |
|# |
|#$IPTABLES -A INPUT -i $INTIF -p tcp --sport 68 --dport 67 -j ACCEPT |
|#$IPTABLES -A INPUT -i $INTIF -p udp --sport 68 --dport 67 -j ACCEPT |
| |
|# HTTPd - Enable the following lines if you run an EXTERNAL WWW server |
|# |
|# NOTE: This is NOT needed for simply enabling PORTFW. This is ONLY |
|# for users that plan on running Apache on the MASQ server itself |
|# |
|#echo -e " - Allowing EXTERNAL access to the WWW server" |
|#$IPTABLES -A INPUT -i $EXTIF -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED,RELATED \ |
|# -p tcp -s $UNIVERSE -d $EXTIP --dport 80 -j ACCEPT |
| |
|# |
|# ----- End OPTIONAL INPUT Section ----- |
| |
| |
|# Catch all rule, all other incoming is denied and logged. |
|# |
|$IPTABLES -A INPUT -s $UNIVERSE -d $UNIVERSE -j reject-and-log-it |
| |
| |
|# --------------------------------------------------------------------- |
| |
|echo -e " - Loading OUTPUT rulesets" |
| |
|####################################################################### |
|# OUTPUT: Outgoing traffic from various interfaces. All rulesets are |
|# already flushed and set to a default policy of DROP. |
|# |
| |
|# Workaround bug in netfilter |
|# See http://www.netfilter.org/security/2002-04-02-icmp-dnat.html |
|# |
|$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -m state -p icmp --state INVALID -j DROP |
| |
|# loopback interface is valid. |
|# |
|$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -o lo -s $UNIVERSE -d $UNIVERSE -j ACCEPT |
| |
| |
|# local interfaces, any source going to local net is valid |
|# |
|$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -o $INTIF -s $EXTIP -d $INTNET -j ACCEPT |
| |
| |
|# local interface, MASQ server source going to the local net is valid |
|# |
|$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -o $INTIF -s $INTIP -d $INTNET -j ACCEPT |
| |
| |
|# outgoing to local net on remote interface, stuffed routing, deny |
|# |
|$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -o $EXTIF -s $UNIVERSE -d $INTNET -j reject-and-log-it |
| |
| |
|# anything else outgoing on remote interface is valid |
|# |
|$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -o $EXTIF -s $EXTIP -d $UNIVERSE -j ACCEPT |
| |
| |
|# ----- Begin OPTIONAL OUTPUT Section ----- |
|# |
| |
|# DHCPd - Enable the following lines if you run an INTERNAL DHCPd server |
|# - Remove BOTH #s all the #s if you need this functionality. |
|# |
|#$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -o $INTIF -p tcp -s $INTIP --sport 67 \ |
|# -d 255.255.255.255 --dport 68 -j ACCEPT |
|#$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -o $INTIF -p udp -s $INTIP --sport 67 \ |
|# -d 255.255.255.255 --dport 68 -j ACCEPT |
| |
|# |
|# ----- End OPTIONAL OUTPUT Section ----- |
| |
| |
|# Catch all rule, all other outgoing is denied and logged. |
|# |
|$IPTABLES -A OUTPUT -s $UNIVERSE -d $UNIVERSE -j reject-and-log-it |
| |
| |
|echo -e " - Loading FORWARD rulesets" |
| |
|####################################################################### |
|# FORWARD: Enable Forwarding and thus IPMASQ |
|# |
| |
|# ----- Begin OPTIONAL FORWARD Section ----- |
|# |
|# Put PORTFW commands here |
|# |
|# ----- End OPTIONAL FORWARD Section ----- |
| |
| |
|echo " - FWD: Allow all connections OUT and only existing/related IN" |
|$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -i $EXTIF -o $INTIF -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED \ |
| -j ACCEPT |
|$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -i $INTIF -o $EXTIF -j ACCEPT |
| |
|# Catch all rule, all other forwarding is denied and logged. |
|# |
|$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -j reject-and-log-it |
| |
| |
|echo " - NAT: Enabling SNAT (MASQUERADE) functionality on $EXTIF" |
|# |
|#More liberal form |
|#$IPTABLES -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o $EXTIF -j MASQUERADE |
|# |
|#Stricter form |
|$IPTABLES -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o $EXTIF -j SNAT --to $EXTIP |
| |
| |
|####################################################################### |
|echo -e "\nrc.firewall-iptables-stronger $FWVER done.\n" |
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+


To automatically start this stronger firewall ruleset at the proper time,
please see the end of the Section 3.4.2 section for full details. Please make
sure you make the correct "rc.firewall-iptables" to
"rc.firewall-iptables-stronger" substitutions!!
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

6.4.2. Stronger IP Firewall (IPCHAINS) rulesets

This section provides a more in-depth guide to using the 2.2.x firewall tool,
IPCHAINS. See above sections for IPFWADM rulesets.

This example is for a firewall/masquerade system behind a PPP link with a
static PPP address (dynamic PPP instructions are included but disabled). The
trusted interface is 192.168.0.1 and the PPP interface IP address has been
changed to protect the guilty :-). I have listed each incoming and outgoing
interface individually to catch IP spoofing as well as stuffed routing and/or
masquerading. A nything not explicitly allowed is FORBIDDEN (well.. rejected
actually). If your IP MASQ box breaks after implementing this
rc.firewall-ipchains-stronger script, be sure that you edit it for your
configuration and check your /var/log/messages or /var/adm/messages SYSLOG
file for any firewall errors.

For more comprehensive examples of a strong IP Masqueraded IPFWADM rulesets
for PPP, Cablemodem users, etc., please see [http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/
~dranch/LINUX/index-linux.html#TrinityOS] TrinityOS - Section 10 and [http://
www.greatcircle.com/] GreatCircle's Firewall WWW page

NOTE #1: --- UPDATE YOUR KERNEL --- Linux 2.2.x kernels less than version
2.2.20 contain several different security vulnerabilities (some were MASQ
specific). Kernels less than 2.2.20 have a few local vulnerabilities. Kernel
versions less than 2.2.16 have a TCP root exploit vulnerability and versions
less than 2.2.11 have a IPCHAINS fragmentation bug. Because of these issues,
users running a firewall with strong IPCHAINS rulesets are open to possible
instrusion. Please upgrade your kernel to a fixed version.

NOTE #2: If you get a dynamically assigned TCP/IP address from your ISP (PPP,
DSL, Cablemodems, etc.), you CANNOT load this strong ruleset upon booting.
You will either need to reload this firewall ruleset EVERY TIME you get a new
IP address or make your /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipchains-stronger ruleset more
intelligent. To do this for various types of connections such as PPP or DHCP
users, please see the Section 7.8 FAQ entry for all the details.

Please also be aware that there are several GUI Firewall creation tools
available as well. Please see Chapter 7for full details.

Lastly, if you are using a STATIC PPP IP address, change the "EXTIF=
"your.static.PPP.address"" line to reflect your address.

----------------------------------------------------------------


+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|#!/bin/sh |
|# |
|# /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipchains-stronger: An example of a Stronger IPCHAINS |
|# firewall ruleset for 2.2 kernels |
|# |
|FWVER=0.75s |
|# |
|# Log: |
|# 0.75s - Updated the commands for dynamically addresses machines and |
|# to point to an expanded FAQ section for more information |
|# |
|# 0.74s - renamed from rc.firewall-2.2-stronger to |
|# rc.firewall-ipchains-stronger to better reflect that this ruleset can |
|# can run on different major kernel versions |
|# - removed unused SED variable |
|# 0.73s - Added additional comments to make PORTFW configs more obvious |
|# 0.72s - #ed out the rule that would allow all traffic destined for the |
|# MASQ server itself to be accepted. Use the OPTIONAL INPUT |
|# section to only allow explicit services. |
|# - Fixed an INTLAN rule that was allowing traffic from ANY IP address |
|# instead of the proper INTIP IP address only. This aligns the |
|# IPCHAINS ruleset with the IPTABLES and IPFWADM ruleset examples |
|# 0.71s - ruleset now uses modprobe instead of insmod |
|# 0.70s - Added missing execution variables |
|# - fixed a missing -p tcp for the commented HTTPd section |
|# 0.65s - Added comments HTTPd rules to the INPUT and OUTPUT section |
|# - Added a comment where to insert IPPORTFW commands |
|# 0.60s - Changed the EXTIP command to work on NON-English distros |
|# - Updated the CASE of some of the script variables |
|# |
| |
|echo -e "\nLoading rc.firewall-ipchains-stronger : version $FWVER..\n" |
| |
| |
|# The location of various iptables and other shell programs |
|# |
|# If your Linux distribution came with a copy of iptables, most |
|# likely it is located in /sbin. If you manually compiled |
|# iptables, the default location is in /usr/local/sbin |
|# |
|# ** Please use the "whereis iptables" command to figure out |
|# ** where your copy is and change the path below to reflect |
|# ** your setup |
|# |
|IPCHAINS=/sbin/ipchains |
|LSMOD=/sbin/lsmod |
|DEPMOD=/sbin/depmod |
|MODPROBE=/sbin/modprobe |
|GREP=/bin/grep |
|AWK=/bin/awk |
|IFCONFIG=/sbin/ifconfig |
| |
|PATH=/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin |
| |
| |
|# Global variables |
|# ---------------- |
| |
|# ALL PPP and DHCP users must set this for the correct EXTERNAL and |
|# INTERNAL interfaces names. Examples: eth0, ppp0, ippp0, etc. |
|# See more info about this below. |
|# |
|EXTIF="ppp0" |
|INTIF="eth0" |
| |
|# The INTERNAL IP address |
|# |
|INTIP="192.168.0.1/32" |
|INTNET="192.168.0.0/24" |
|echo " Internal IP: $INTIP" |
|echo " Internal Network: $INTNET" |
| |
| |
| |
|# Load all required IP MASQ modules |
|# |
|# NOTE: Only load the IP MASQ modules you need. All current IP MASQ modules |
|# are shown below but are commented from loading. |
| |
|# Needed to initially load modules |
|# |
|$DEPMOD -a |
| |
|# Supports the proper masquerading of FTP file transfers using the PORT method |
|# |
|$MODPROBE ip_masq_ftp |
| |
|# Supports the masquerading of RealAudio over UDP. Without this module, |
|# RealAudio WILL function but in TCP mode. This can cause a reduction |
|# in sound quality |
|# |
|$MODPROBE ip_masq_raudio |
| |
|# Supports the masquerading of IRC DCC file transfers |
|# |
|#$MODPROBE ip_masq_irc |
| |
| |
|# Supports the masquerading of Quake and QuakeWorld by default. These modules are |
|# for multiple users behind the Linux MASQ server. If you are going to |
|# play Quake I, II, and III, use the second example. |
|# |
|# NOTE: If you get ERRORs loading the QUAKE module, you are running an old |
|# ----- kernel that has bugs in it. Please upgrade to the newest kernel. |
|# |
|#Quake I / QuakeWorld (ports 26000 and 27000) |
|#$MODPROBE ip_masq_quake |
|# |
|#Quake I/II/III / QuakeWorld (ports 26000, 27000, 27910, 27960) |
|#$MODPROBE ip_masq_quake 26000,27000,27910,27960 |
| |
| |
|# Supports the masquerading of the CuSeeme video conferencing software |
|# |
|#$MODPROBE ip_masq_cuseeme |
| |
|#Supports the masquerading of the VDO-live video conferencing software |
|# |
|#$MODPROBE ip_masq_vdolive |
| |
| |
|#CRITICAL: Enable IP forwarding since it is disabled by default |
|# |
|# Redhat Users: you may try changing the options in |
|# /etc/sysconfig/network from: |
|# |
|# FORWARD_IPV4=false |
|# to |
|# FORWARD_IPV4=true |
|# |
|echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward |
| |
| |
|#CRITICAL: Enable automatic IP defragmentation since it is disabled by default |
|# in 2.2.x kernels |
|# |
|# This used as a compile-time option but the behavior was changed |
|# in 2.2.12. It should also be noted that some distributions have |
|# removed this option from the /proc table. If this entry isn't |
|# present in your /proc, don't worry about it. |
|# |
|echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_always_defrag |
| |
| |
|# Dynamic IP users: |
|# |
|# If you get your IP address dynamically from SLIP, PPP, or DHCP, enable this |
|# following option. This enables dynamic-ip address hacking in IP MASQ, |
|# making life with Diald and similar programs much easier. |
|# |
|#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_dynaddr |
| |
| |
|# Enable the LooseUDP patch which some Internet-based games require |
|# |
|# If you are trying to get an Internet game to work through your IP MASQ box, |
|# and you configured it to the best of your ability without it working, try |
|# enabling this option (delete the "#" character). This option is disabled |
|# by default due to possible internal machine UDP port scanning |
|# vulnerabilities. |
|# |
|#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_masq_udp_dloose |
| |
| |
|# Specify your Static IP address here. |
|# |
|# If you have a DYNAMIC IP address, you need to make this ruleset recognize |
|# your IP address everytime you get a new IP. To do this, enable the |
|# following one-line script. (Please note that the different single and |
|# double quote characters MATTER). |
|# |
|# |
|# DHCP users (Cablemodem and DSL ) users: |
|# --------------------------------------- |
|# If you get your TCP/IP address via DHCP, **you will need ** to enable the |
|# #ed out command below underneath the PPP section AND replace the word |
|# "ppp0" with the name of your EXTERNAL Internet connection (eth0, eth1, etc) |
|# on the lines for "ppp-ip" and "EXTIP". |
|# |
|# DHCP and PPP users: The remote DHCP or PPP server can and will change |
|# IP addresses on you over time. To deal with this, users should configure |
|# their DHCP or PPP client to re-run the rc.firewall-* ruleset everytime |
|# the IP address is changed. Please see the "masq-and-dyn-addr" FAQ entry |
|# in the IPMASQ howto for full details on how to do this. |
|# |
|# |
|# Determine the external IP automatically: |
|# ---------------------------------------- |
|# |
|# The following line will determine your external IP address. This |
|# line is somewhat complex and confusing but it will also work for |
|# all NON-English Linux distributions. |
|# |
|# Make sure the EXTIF variable above is set to reflect the name |
|# of your Internet connection |
|# |
|EXTIP="`$IFCONFIG $EXTIF | $AWK \ |
| /$EXTIF/'{next}//{split($0,a,":");split(a[2],a," ");print a[1];exit}'`" |
| |
| |
| |
|# MASQ timeouts |
|# |
|# 2 hrs timeout for TCP session timeouts |
|# 10 sec timeout for traffic after the TCP/IP "FIN" packet is received |
|# 60 sec timeout for UDP traffic (MASQ'ed ICQ users must enable a 30sec |
|# firewall timeout in ICQ itself) |
|# |
|$IPCHAINS -M -S 7200 10 60 |
| |
|############################################################################# |
|# Incoming, flush and set default policy of reject. Actually the default policy |
|# is irrelevant because there is a catch all rule with deny and log. |
|# |
|$IPCHAINS -F input |
|$IPCHAINS -P input REJECT |
| |
|# local interface, local machines, going anywhere is valid |
|# |
|$IPCHAINS -A input -i $INTIF -s $INTNET -d 0.0.0.0/0 -j ACCEPT |
| |
|# remote interface, claiming to be local machines, IP spoofing, get lost |
|# |
|$IPCHAINS -A input -i $EXTIF -s $INTNET -d 0.0.0.0/0 -l -j REJECT |
| |
| |
|# remote interface, any source, going to the MASQ servers IP address is valid |
|# |
|# ENABLE this line if you want ALL Internet traffic to connect to your |
|# the various servers running on the MASQ server. This includes |
|# web servers, ssh servers, dns servers, etc. |
|# |
|# I DON'T recommend you enable this rule. Instead, only enable specific |
|# access to select server ports under the "OPTIONAL INPUT Section". |
|# An example of enabling HTTP (WWW) has been given below: |
|# |
|# |
|#$IPCHAINS -A input -i $EXTIF -s 0.0.0.0/0 -d $EXTIP/32 -j ACCEPT |
| |
| |
|# loopback interface is valid. |
|# |
|$IPCHAINS -A input -i lo -s 0.0.0.0/0 -d 0.0.0.0/0 -j ACCEPT |
| |
| |
|# ----- Begin OPTIONAL INPUT Section ----- |
|# |
| |
|# HTTPd - Enable the following lines if you either run a WWW server on |
|# the IPMASQ server -OR- plan on PORTFW'ing HTTP traffic to |
|# an internal WWW server |
|# |
|#$IPCHAINS -A input -i $EXTIF -p tcp -s 0.0.0.0/0 -d $EXTIP 80 -j ACCEPT |
| |
|# |
|# ----- End OPTIONAL INPUT Section ----- |
| |
| |
|# catch all rule, all other incoming is denied and logged. pity there is no |
|# log option on the policy but this does the job instead. |
|# |
|$IPCHAINS -A input -s 0.0.0.0/0 -d 0.0.0.0/0 -l -j REJECT |
| |
|############################################################################# |
|# Outgoing, flush and set default policy of reject. Actually the default policy |
|# is irrelevant because there is a catch all rule with deny and log. |
|# |
|$IPCHAINS -F output |
|$IPCHAINS -P output REJECT |
| |
|# local interface, MASQ server source going to the local net is valid |
|# |
|$IPCHAINS -A output -i $INTIF -s $INTIP -d $INTNET -j ACCEPT |
| |
|# outgoing to local net on remote interface, stuffed routing, deny |
|# |
|$IPCHAINS -A output -i $EXTIF -s 0.0.0.0/0 -d $INTNET -l -j REJECT |
| |
|# outgoing from local net on remote interface, stuffed masquerading, deny |
|# |
|$IPCHAINS -A output -i $EXTIF -s $INTNET -d 0.0.0.0/0 -l -j REJECT |
| |
|# anything else outgoing on remote interface is valid |
|# |
|$IPCHAINS -A output -i $EXTIF -s $EXTIP/32 -d 0.0.0.0/0 -j ACCEPT |
| |
|# loopback interface is valid. |
|# |
|$IPCHAINS -A output -i lo -s 0.0.0.0/0 -d 0.0.0.0/0 -j ACCEPT |
| |
| |
|# ----- Begin OPTIONAL OUTPUT Section ----- |
|# |
| |
|# HTTPd - Enable the following lines if you either run a WWW server on |
|# the IPMASQ server -OR- plan on PORTFW'ing HTTP traffic to |
|# an internal WWW server |
|# |
|#$IPCHAINS -A output -i $EXTIF -p tcp -s $EXTIP 80 -d 0.0.0.0/0 -j ACCEPT |
| |
|# |
|# ----- End OPTIONAL OUTPUT Section ----- |
| |
|# catch all rule, all other outgoing is denied and logged. pity there is no |
|# log option on the policy but this does the job instead. |
|# |
|$IPCHAINS -A output -s 0.0.0.0/0 -d 0.0.0.0/0 -l -j REJECT |
| |
|############################################################################# |
|# Forwarding, flush and set default policy of deny. Actually the default policy |
|# is irrelevant because there is a catch all rule with deny and log. |
|# |
|$IPCHAINS -F forward |
|$IPCHAINS -P forward DENY |
| |
| |
|# ----- Begin OPTIONAL FORWARD Section ----- |
|# |
|# Put PORTFW commands here |
|# |
|# ----- End OPTIONAL FORWARD Section ----- |
| |
| |
|# Masquerade from local net on local interface to anywhere. |
|# |
|$IPCHAINS -A forward -i $EXTIF -s $INTNET -d 0.0.0.0/0 -j MASQ |
|# |
|# catch all rule, all other forwarding is denied and logged. pity there is no |
|# log option on the policy but this does the job instead. |
|# |
|$IPCHAINS -A forward -s 0.0.0.0/0 -d 0.0.0.0/0 -l -j REJECT |
| |
|#End of file. |
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------+


To automatically start this stronger firewall ruleset at the proper time,
please see the end of the Section 3.4.2 section for full details. Please make
sure you make the correct "rc.firewall-ipchains" to
"rc.firewall-ipchains-stronger" substitutions!!

With IPCHAINS, you can block traffic to a particular site using the "input",
"output", and/or "forward" rules. Remember that the set of rules are scanned
from top to bottom and "-A" tells IPCHIANS to "append" this new rule to the
existing set of rules. So with this in mind, any specific restrictions need
to come before any global rules. For example:

Using "input" rules:

Probably the fastest and most efficient method to block traffic, but this
method only stops the MASQed machines and NOT the firewall machine itself. Of
course, you might want to allow that combination.

Anyway, to block 204.50.10.13:

+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|In the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipchains-stronger ruleset: |
|... start of "input" rules ... |
| |
|# reject and log local interface, local machines going to 204.50.10.13 |
|# |
|ipchains -A input -s 192.168.0.0/24 -d 204.50.10.13/32 -l -j REJECT |
| |
| |
|# local interface, local machines, going anywhere is valid |
|# |
|ipchains -A input -s 192.168.0.0/24 -d 0.0.0.0/0 -l -j ACCEPT |
| |
| |
|... end of "input" rules ... |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Using "output" rules:

This is the slower method to block traffic because the packets must go
through masquerading before they are dropped. Yet, this rule even stops the
firewall machine from accessing the forbidden site.

... start of "output" rules ... # reject and log outgoing to 204.50.10.13 #
ipchains -A output -s $ppp_ip/32 -d 204.50.10.13/32 -l -j REJECT # anything
else outgoing on remote interface is valid # ipchains -A output -s $ppp_ip/32
-d 0.0.0.0/0 -l -j ACCEPT ... end of "output" rules ...

Using "forward" rules:

Probably slower than "input" rules for blocking traffic, this only stops
masqueraded machines (e.g. internal machines). The firewall machine can still
reach forbidden site(s).

... start of "forward" rules ... # Reject and log from local net on PPP
interface to 204.50.10.13. # ipchains -A forward -i ppp0 -s 192.168.0.0/24 -d
204.50.10.13/32 -l -j REJECT # Masquerade from local net on local interface
to anywhere. # ipchains -A forward -i ppp0 -s 192.168.0.0/24 -d 0.0.0.0/0 -j
MASQ ... end of "forward" rules ...

No need for a special rule to allow machines on the 192.168.0.0/24 network to
go to 204.50.11.0. Why? It is already covered by the global MASQ rule.

NOTE: Unlike IPFWADM, IPCHIANS has only one way of coding the interfaces
name. IPCHAINS uses the "-i eth0" option where as IPFWADM had both "-W" for
the interface name and "-V" for the interface's IP address.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

6.4.3. Stronger IP Firewall (IPFWADM) Rulesets

This section provides a more in-depth guide on using the 2.0.x firewall tool,
IPFWADM. See below for IPCHAINS rulesets

This example is for a firewall/masquerade system behind a PPP link with a
static PPP address (dynamic PPP instructions are included but disabled). The
trusted interface is 192.168.0.1 and the PPP interface IP address has been
changed to protect the guilty :). I have listed each incoming and outgoing
interface individually to catch IP spoofing as well as stuffed routing and/or
masquerading. Anything not explicitly allowed is FORBIDDEN (well.. rejected,
actually). If your IP MASQ box breaks after implementing this
rc.firewall-ipfwadm-stronger script, be sure that you edit it for your
configuration and check your /var/log/messages or /var/adm/messages SYSLOG
file for any firewall errors.

For more comprehensive examples of a strong IP Masqueraded IPFWADM rulesets
for PPP, Cablemodem users, etc., please see [http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/
~dranch/LINUX/index-linux.html#TrinityOS] TrinityOS - Section 10 and [http://
www.greatcircle.com/] GreatCircle's Firewall WWW page

NOTE #2: If you get a dynamically assigned TCP/IP address from your ISP (PPP,
DSL, Cablemodems, etc.), you CANNOT load this strong ruleset upon booting.
You will either need to reload this firewall ruleset EVERY TIME you get a new
IP address or make your /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipchains-stronger ruleset more
intelligent. To do this for various types of connections such as PPP or DHCP
users, please see the Section 7.8 FAQ entry for all the details.

Please also be aware that there are several GUI Firewall creation tools
available as well. Please see Chapter 7for full details.

Lastly, if you are using a STATIC PPP IP address, change the "ppp_ip=
"your.static.PPP.address"" line to reflect your address.

----------------------------------------------------------------


+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|#!/bin/sh |
|# |
|# /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipfwadm-stronger: An example of a semi-STRONG |
|# IPFWADM firewall ruleset for 2.0 kernels |
|# |
|FWVER=0.74s |
|# |
|# Log: |
|# 0.74s - Updated the commands for dynamically addresses machines and |
|# to point to an expanded FAQ section for more information |
|# |
|# 0.73s - renamed from rc.firewall-2.0-stronger to |
|# rc.firewall-ipfwadm-stronger |
|# |
|# 0.72s - #ed out the rule that would allow all traffic destined for the |
|# MASQ server itself to be accepted. Use the OPTIONAL INPUT |
|# section to only allow explicit services. |
| |
| |
|PATH=/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin |
| |
|# testing, wait a bit then clear all firewall rules. |
|# uncomment the following lines if you want the firewall to automatically |
|# disable after 10 minutes. |
|# |
|# Disabled by default |
|# |
|# (sleep 600; \ |
|# ipfwadm -I -f; \ |
|# ipfwadm -I -p accept; \ |
|# ipfwadm -O -f; \ |
|# ipfwadm -O -p accept; \ |
|# ipfwadm -F -f; \ |
|# ipfwadm -F -p accept; \ |
|# ) & |
| |
| |
|# Load all required IP MASQ modules |
|# |
|# NOTE: Only load the IP MASQ modules you need. All current IP MASQ modules |
|# are shown below but are commented from loading. |
| |
|# Needed to initially load modules |
|# |
|/sbin/depmod -a |
| |
|# Supports the proper masquerading of FTP file transfers using the PORT method |
|# |
|/sbin/modprobe ip_masq_ftp |
| |
|# Supports the masquerading of RealAudio over UDP. Without this module, |
|# RealAudio WILL function but in TCP mode. This can cause a reduction |
|# in sound quality |
|# |
|#/sbin/modprobe ip_masq_raudio |
| |
|# Supports the masquerading of IRC DCC file transfers |
|# |
|#/sbin/modprobe ip_masq_irc |
| |
| |
|# Supports the masquerading of Quake and QuakeWorld by default. This modules is |
|# for multiple users behind the Linux MASQ server. If you are going to |
|# play Quake I, II, and III, use the second example. |
|# |
|# NOTE: If you get ERRORs loading the QUAKE module, you are running an old |
|# ----- kernel that has bugs in it. Please upgrade to the newest kernel. |
|# |
|#Quake I / QuakeWorld (ports 26000 and 27000) |
|#/sbin/modprobe ip_masq_quake |
|# |
|#Quake I/II/III / QuakeWorld (ports 26000, 27000, 27910, 27960) |
|#/sbin/modprobe ip_masq_quake 26000,27000,27910,27960 |
| |
| |
|# Supports the masquerading of the CuSeeme video conferencing software |
|# |
|#/sbin/modprobe ip_masq_cuseeme |
| |
|#Supports the masquerading of the VDO-live video conferencing software |
|# |
|#/sbin/modprobe ip_masq_vdolive |
| |
| |
|#CRITICAL: Enable IP forwarding, since it is disabled by default |
|# |
|# Redhat Users: you may try changing the options in /etc/sysconfig/network |
|# from: |
|# |
|# FORWARD_IPV4=false |
|# to |
|# FORWARD_IPV4=true |
|# |
|echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward |
| |
| |
|#CRITICAL: Enable automatic IP defragmenting since it is disabled by default |
|# in 2.2.x kernels |
|# |
|# This used to be a compile-time option but the behavior was changed |
|# in 2.2.12 |
|# |
|echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_always_defrag |
| |
| |
|# Dynamic IP users: |
|# |
|# If you get your IP address dynamically from SLIP, PPP, or DHCP, enable this |
|# following option. This allows dynamic-ip address hacking in IP MASQ, |
|# making the life with Diald and similar programs much easier. |
|# |
|#echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_dynaddr |
| |
| |
|# Specify your Static IP address here. |
|# |
|# If you have a DYNAMIC IP address, you need to make this ruleset understand |
|# your IP address everytime you get a new IP. To do this, enable the |
|# following one-line script. (Please note that the different single and |
|# double quote characters MATTER). |
|# |
|# |
|# DHCP (Cablemodem and DSL) and PPP users: |
|# ---------------------------------------- |
|# If you get your TCP/IP address a dynamic IP address **you will need ** to |
|# enable the #ed out command below underneath the PPP section AND replace the word |
|# "ppp0" with the name of your EXTERNAL Internet connection (eth0, eth1, |
|# etc). |
|# |
|# DHCP and PPP users: The remote DHCP or PPP server can and will change |
|# IP addresses on you over time. To deal with this, users should configure |
|# their DHCP or PPP client to re-run the rc.firewall-* ruleset everytime |
|# the IP address is changed. Please see the "masq-and-dyn-addr" FAQ entry |
|# in the IPMASQ howto for full details on how to do this. |
|# |
|# |
|# PPP and DHCP Users: |
|# ------------------- |
|# Remove the # on the line below and place a # in front of the line after that. |
|# |
|#ppp_ip="`/sbin/ifconfig ppp0 | grep 'inet addr' | awk '{print $2}' | sed -e 's/.*://'`" |
|# |
|ppp_ip="your.static.PPP.address" |
| |
| |
|# MASQ timeouts |
|# |
|# 2 hrs timeout for TCP session timeouts |
|# 10 sec timeout for traffic after the TCP/IP "FIN" packet is received |
|# 60 sec timeout for UDP traffic (MASQ'ed ICQ users must enable a 30sec |
|# firewall timeout in ICQ itself) |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -M -s 7200 10 60 |
| |
| |
|############################################################################# |
|# Incoming, flush and set default policy of reject. Actually the default policy |
|# is irrelevant because there is a catch all rule with deny and log. |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -I -f |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -I -p reject |
| |
|# local interface, local machines, going anywhere is valid |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -I -a accept -V 192.168.0.1 -S 192.168.0.0/24 -D 0.0.0.0/0 |
| |
|# remote interface, claiming to be local machines, IP spoofing, get lost |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -I -a reject -V $ppp_ip -S 192.168.0.0/24 -D 0.0.0.0/0 -o |
| |
| |
|# remote interface, any source, going to the MASQ servers IP address is valid |
|# |
|# ENABLE this line if you want ALL Internet traffic to connect to your |
|# the various servers running on the MASQ server. This includes |
|# web servers, ssh servers, dns servers, etc. |
|# |
|# I DON'T recommend you enable this rule. Instead, only enable specific |
|# access to select server ports under the "OPTIONAL INPUT Section". |
|# An example of enabling HTTP (WWW) has been given below: |
|# |
|# |
|#/sbin/ipfwadm -I -a accept -V $ppp_ip -S 0.0.0.0/0 -D $ppp_ip/32 |
| |
| |
|# loopback interface is valid. |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -I -a accept -V 127.0.0.1 -S 0.0.0.0/0 -D 0.0.0.0/0 |
| |
| |
|# catch all rule, all other incoming is denied and logged. pity there is no |
|# log option on the policy but this does the job instead. |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -I -a reject -S 0.0.0.0/0 -D 0.0.0.0/0 -o |
| |
| |
|############################################################################# |
|# Outgoing, flush and set default policy of reject. Actually the default policy |
|# is irrelevant because there is a catch all rule with deny and log. |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -O -f |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -O -p reject |
| |
|# local interface, MASQ server source going to the local net is valid |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -O -a accept -V 192.168.0.1 -S 0.0.0.0/0 -D 192.168.0.0/24 |
| |
|# outgoing to local net on remote interface, stuffed routing, deny |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -O -a reject -V $ppp_ip -S 0.0.0.0/0 -D 192.168.0.0/24 -o |
| |
|# outgoing from local net on remote interface, stuffed masquerading, deny |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -O -a reject -V $ppp_ip -S 192.168.0.0/24 -D 0.0.0.0/0 -o |
| |
|# outgoing from local net on remote interface, stuffed masquerading, deny |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -O -a reject -V $ppp_ip -S 0.0.0.0/0 -D 192.168.0.0/24 -o |
| |
|# anything else outgoing on remote interface is valid |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -O -a accept -V $ppp_ip -S $ppp_ip/32 -D 0.0.0.0/0 |
| |
|# loopback interface is valid. |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -O -a accept -V 127.0.0.1 -S 0.0.0.0/0 -D 0.0.0.0/0 |
| |
|# catch all rule, all other outgoing is denied and logged. pity there is no |
|# log option on the policy but this does the job instead. |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -O -a reject -S 0.0.0.0/0 -D 0.0.0.0/0 -o |
| |
| |
|############################################################################# |
|# Forwarding, flush and set default policy of deny. Actually the default policy |
|# is irrelevant because there is a catch all rule with deny and log. |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -F -f |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -F -p reject |
| |
|# Masquerade from local net on local interface to anywhere. |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -F -a masquerade -W ppp0 -S 192.168.0.0/24 -D 0.0.0.0/0 |
|# |
|# catch all rule, all other forwarding is denied and logged. Pity there is no |
|# log option on the policy but this does the job instead. |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -F -a reject -S 0.0.0.0/0 -D 0.0.0.0/0 -o |
| |
|#End of file. |
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+


To automatically start this stronger firewall ruleset at the proper time,
please see the end of the Section 3.4.3 section for full details. Please make
sure you make the correct "rc.firewall-ipfwadm" to
"rc.firewall-ipfwadm-stronger" substitutions!!

With IPFWADM, you can block traffic to a particular site using the -I, -O or
-F rules. Remember that the set of rules are scanned top to bottom and "-a"
tells IPFWADM to "append" this new rule to the existing set of rules. So with
this in mind, any specific restrictions need to come before global rules. For
example:

Using -I (input ) rules:

Probably the fastest and most efficient method to block traffic but it only
stops the MASQed machines, and NOT the the firewall machine itself. Of
course, you might want to allow that combination.

Anyway, to block 204.50.10.13:

In the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipfwadm-stronger ruleset: ... start of -I rules
... # reject and log local interface, local machines going to 204.50.10.13 #
/sbin/ipfwadm -I -a reject -V 192.168.0.1 -S 192.168.0.0/24 -D 204.50.10.13/
32 -o # local interface, local machines, going anywhere is valid # /sbin/
ipfwadm -I -a accept -V 192.168.0.1 -S 192.168.0.0/24 -D 0.0.0.0/0 ... end of
-I rules ...

Using -O (output) rules:

This is the slower method to block traffic because the packets go through
masquerading first before they are dropped. Yet, this rule even stops the
firewall machine from accessing the forbidden site.

... start of -O rules ... # reject and log outgoing to 204.50.10.13 # /sbin/
ipfwadm -O -a reject -V $ppp_ip -S $ppp_ip/32 -D 204.50.10.13/32 -o #
anything else outgoing on remote interface is valid # /sbin/ipfwadm -O -a
accept -V $ppp_ip -S $ppp_ip/32 -D 0.0.0.0/0 ... end of -O rules ...

Using -F (forward) rules:

Probably slower than -I (input) rules for blocking traffic, this still only
stops masqueraded machines (e.g. internal machines). The firewall machine can
still reach forbidden site(s).

... start of -F rules ... # Reject and log from local net on PPP interface to
204.50.10.13. # /sbin/ipfwadm -F -a reject -W ppp0 -S 192.168.0.0/24 -D
204.50.10.13/32 -o # Masquerade from local net on local interface to
anywhere. # /sbin/ipfwadm -F -a masquerade -W ppp0 -S 192.168.0.0/24 -D
0.0.0.0/0 ... end of -F rules ...

There is no need for a special rule to allow machines on the 192.168.0.0/24
network to go to 204.50.11.0. Why? It is already covered by the global MASQ
rule.

NOTE: There is more than one way of coding the interfaces in the above rules.
For example instead of "-V 192.168.255.1" you can code "-W eth0", instead of
"-V $ppp_ip" , you can use "-W ppp0". The "-V" method was phased out with the
imgration to IPCHAINS, but for IPFWADM users, its more of a personal choice
and documentation.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

6.5. IP Masquerading multiple internal networks

Masquerading more than one internal network is fairly simple. You need to
first make sure that all of your networks are running correctly (both
internal and external). You then need to enable traffic to pass to both the
other internal interfaces and to be MASQed to the Internet.

Next, you need to enable Masquerading on the INTERNAL interfaces. This
example uses a total of THREE interfaces: EXTIF stands for the eth0 interface
which is the EXTERNAL connection to the Internet. INTIF stands for the eth1
interface and is the 192.168.0.0 network. Finally, INTIF2 stands for the eth2
interface and is the 192.168.1.0 network. Both INTIF and INTIF2 will be
MASQed out of interface eth0 or EXTIF. In your rc.firewall-* ruleset next to
the existing MASQ at the very end of the ruleset, add the following:
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

6.5.1. iptables support for multiple internal lans

* +-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|# 2.6.x and 2.4.x kernels with IPTABLES |
|# |
|# The following rules build upon the rc.firewall-iptables-stronger ruleset. |
|# Please see that ruleset in Section 6 for how all variables get set, etc. |
| |
| |
| #Enable internal interfaces to communication between each other |
| # |
| $IPTABLES -A FORWARD -i $EXTIF -o $INTIF2 -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED \ |
| -j ACCEPT |
| $IPTABLES -A FORWARD -i $INTIF -o $INTIF2 -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED \ |
| -j ACCEPT |
| $IPTABLES -A FORWARD -i $INTIF2 -o $INTIF -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED \ |
| -j ACCEPT |
| |
| $IPTABLES -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o $EXTIF -j SNAT --to $EXTIP |
| |
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------+


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
6.5.2. ipchains support for multiple internal lans

* +----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|# 2.2.x kernels with IPCHAINS |
|# |
|# The following rules build upon the rc.firewall-ipchains-stronger ruleset. |
|# Please see that ruleset in Section 6 for how all variables get set, etc. |
| |
| #Enable internal interfaces to communication between each other |
| $IPCHAINS -A forward -i eth1 -d 192.168.0.0/24 -j ACCEPT |
| $IPCHAINS -A forward -i eth2 -d 192.168.1.0/24 -j ACCEPT |
| |
| #Enable internal interfaces to MASQ out to the Internet |
| $IPCHAINS -A forward -j MASQ -i eth0 -s 192.168.0.0/24 -d 0.0.0.0/0 |
| $IPCHAINS -A forward -j MASQ -i eth0 -s 192.168.1.0/24 -d 0.0.0.0/0 |
| |
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------+


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
6.5.3. ipfwadm support for multiple internal lans

* +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|# 2.0.x kernels with IPFWADM |
|# |
|# The following rules build upon the rc.firewall-ipfwadm-stronger ruleset. |
|# Please see that ruleset in Section 6 for how all variables get set, etc. |
| |
| #Enable internal interfaces to communication between each other |
| /sbin/ipfwadm -F -a accept -V 192.168.0.1 -D 192.168.1.0/24 |
| /sbin/ipfwadm -F -a accept -V 192.168.1.1 -D 192.168.0.0/24 |
| |
| #Enable internal interfaces to MASQ out to the Internet |
| /sbin/ipfwadm -F -a masq -W eth0 -S 192.168.0.0/24 -D 0.0.0.0/0 |
| /sbin/ipfwadm -F -a masq -W eth0 -S 192.168.1.0/24 -D 0.0.0.0/0 |
| |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+


Please note that it is CORRECT to have "eth0" specified multiple times for
the exmples shown above. The reason for this is the Linux kernel needs to
know which interface is used for OUTGOING traffic. Since eth0 in the above
examples is the Internet connection, it is listed for each internal
interface.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

6.6. IP Masquerade and Dial-on-Demand Connections



1. If you would like to setup your network to automatically dial up the
Internet, either the Diald demand dial-up or new versions of the PPPd
packages will be of great utility. Both Diald and PPPd are very powerful
in their configuration flexibility.

2. To setup PPPd for Dial-on-Demand, pease check out the [http://
www.samba.org/ppp/index.html] PPPd Homepage

3. To setup Diald, please check out the [http://diald.sourceforge.net/]
Diald Homepage or [http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/
index-linux.html#TrinityOS] TrinityOS - Section 23

4. Once Dial on Demand and IP Masq have been setup properly, any MASQed
client machines that initiate a web, telnet or ftp session will make the
Linux box dynamically bring up its Internet link.

5. There is a timeout that will occur with the first connection. This is
inevitable if you are using analog modems. The time taken to establish
the modem link and the PPP connections may cause your client program (WWW
browser, etc.) to stop. This isn't common though. If this does happen,
just retry that Internet traffic request (say a WWW page) again and it
should come up fine. You can also try setting echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/
ipv4/ip_dynaddr kernel option to help with this initial setup.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
6.7. Port Forwarding with IPTABLES or external tools like IPPORTFW,
IPMASQADM, IPAUTOFW, REDIR, UDPRED, and other Port Forwarding tools

IPTABLES as well as IPPORTFW, IPAUTOFW, REDIR, UDPRED, and other programs
offer generic TCP and/or UDP port forwarding for Linux IP Masquerade. These
tools are typically used with or as a replacement for specific IP MASQ
modules to get a specific network traffic through the MASQ server.

With port forwarders, you can redirect data connections from the Internet to
an internal, privately addressed machine behind your IP MASQ server. This
forwarding ability includes network protocols such as TELNET, WWW, and SMTP.
Protocols such as FTP, legacy ICQ, and others require special handling via
kernel modules (see below).

NOTE: If you are just looking to do simple port forwarding but you don't need
Masquerading support, you don't have any choice. You will STILL NEED to
enable IP Masquerading support in the kernel AND either run a IPTABLES,
IPCHAINS, or IPFWADM ruleset to be able to use Linux's port forwarding tools.

So why all the different choices? IPTABLES, IPPORTFW, MARK (MFW), IPMASQADM
(PORTFW or AUTOFW), IPAUTOFW, REDIR, and UDPRED (all URLs are in Section
3.2.3) are the various tools available to IP MASQ users to allow this type of
functionality depending on their kernel version. Later, as the Linux IP
Masquerade feature matured, many of these tools were eventually replaced by
the IPTABLES or PORTFW and MARK systems which are far more intelligent
solutions.

For the later 2.2.x kernels, the IPMASQADM tool combined the legacy IPAUTOFW
and IPPORTFW 2.0.x kernel tools into one binary. Both the IPMASQADM tool for
2.2.x kernels as well as IPTABLES for the 2.6.x and 2.4.x kernels also
supports a new mechanism called "MARK" or MFW for PORTFW functionality. The
MARK system works where a specific IPTABLES or IPCHAINS ruleset would match a
given packet sequence. Once matched, the tool would "mark" these packets.
Later, the IPMASQADM tool or a specific IPTABLE "table" could be instructed
to change these packets as needed and forward them off to their desired
internal destination. Currently, this HOWTO doesn't cover the MARK solution
but it will in the future.

Anyway, because of the availablity of the newer tools, it is *HIGHLY
DISCOURAGED* to use the old tools such as IPAUTOFW (even AUTOFW in IPMASQADM)
and REDIR because they don't properly notify the Linux kernel of their
presence and can ultimately CRASH your Linux server with extreme use.

NOTE #2: With enabling PORTFW functionality in ANY 2.2/2.0 Linux kernel
(2.6.x. and 2.4.x users won't use these specific tools anyway), internal
machines typically CANNOT use the same "external" PORTFWed IP address to
access a given internal" machine. To put it another way, PORTFW was only
intended to be used with "external" computers on the Internet. If this is an
issue for you, you can also use the REDIR tool for older 2.2.x and 2.0.x
kernels to let internal machines get redirected to the internal servers too.
2.6.x and 2.4.x kernels users running IPTABLES solves this issue once and for
all and is fully covered in a FAQ entry in Section 7.19 below. If you would
like a technical explination on why this internal/external forwarding doesn't
work, please page down towards the bottom of the 2.2.x PORTFW section for a
note from Juan Jose Ciarlante.

NOTE #3: The forwarding of non-NAT friendly traffic such as FTP server
traffic to an internal MASQed FTP server, known as PORTFW FTP, is now fully
supported in the 2.6.x and 2.4.x kernels as well as in the 2.2.x kernels via
a BETA version FTP kernel module (does NOT come with the stock Linus
kernels). It should also be noted that you can also PORTFW FTP traffic using
an external FTP proxy program (not covered in this HOWTO). It should be noted
that the Beta 2.2.x FTP kernel module code is still experimental and some
people get better results simply using ACTIVE FTP sessions compared to
PASSIVE connections. Interestingly enough, other people have seen the exact
opposite behavior. Please let us know what your results are like. More about
this is covered below in both the 2.2.x and 2.0.x sections as the solutions
require the use of different patches.

WARNING! Before jumping right into installing ANY of these tools, it needs to
be mentioned that network security can be an issue with ANY PORT FORWARD
tool. The reason for this is because these tools basically create a hole in
strong packet firewalls for the required TCP/UDP ports. Though this doesn't
pose any threat to your Linux machine, it might be an issue to the PORTFW'ed
internal machine(s). No worries though, this is what Steven Clarke (the
author of IPPORTFW) had to say about that:

+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| "Port Forwarding is only called within masquerading functions so it |
| fits inside the same IPFWADM/IPCHAINS rules. Masquerading is an extension to |
| IP forwarding. Therefore, ipportfw only sees a packet if it fits |
| both the input and masquerading ipfwadm rule sets." |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------------+

What that means in English is that if you have a strong packet firewall
running, PORTFW doesn't directly bypass any of that security. You will still
be able to allow or deny specific IPs and/or domains to this new PORTFW'ed
resource if you so wish.

With this said, it's important to have a strong firewall ruleset. Please see
Section 6.4.1, Section 6.4.2, and Section 6.4.3 for more details on getting
strong rulesets.

* 2.6.x and 2.4.x kernels have PORTFW functional already built in using the
IPTABLES tool. 2.2.x and 2.0.x kernel kernel users will need to
re-compile the Linux kernel to support PORTFW. It should be noted that
some Linux distribution kernels might have this already done for you.

* The latest 2.2.x kernel users will already have the PORTFW kernel option
available to them though you might still need to recompile the kernel via
the normal kernel "make" procedures.

* 2.0.x users will need to apply a simple kernel option patch to have
access to then enable this via the normal kernel "make" procedures.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
6.7.1. IPTABLES-based PORTFWD'ing: Using IPTABLES's PREROUTING option for
2.6.x and 2.4.x kernels

As mentioned before, a port forward or "PORTFW" allows a single or range of
TCP/IP ports from the external side of the network to be forwarded into the
inside network.

Unlike ALL previous Linux kernels, the 2.6.x and 2.4.x series kernels now
allows for full PORTFW, PORTFW FTP, and PORTFW REDIR functionality within the
"iptables" tool itself.

NOTE: Once you enable a port forwarder on say port 80 (forward WWW traffic
through the MASQ server to an internal WWW server), that port will no longer
be used by the Linux IP Masquerade server itself. To be more specific, if you
have a WWW server already running on the MASQ server, enabling PORTFW will
now give all Internet users acces to the WWW pages from the -INTERNAL- WWW
server and not the pages on your IP MASQ server.

To enable port forwarding on an IPTABLES (2.6.x or 2.4.x kernel):

* Edit the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-iptables ruleset and place the lines shown
below just ABOVE the "FWD: Allow all connections OUT and only existing
and related ones IN" line (in the "Optional FORWARD section"). Please be
sure to replace the word "$EXTIP" with your specific Internet IP address.

* NOTE: Unlike the 2.2.x and 2.0.x kernels, PORTFWed traffic does *not*
traverse the INPUT or OUTPUT rules. It only traverses the FORWARD rule.


* NOTE: If you get a dynamically assigned TCP/IP address from your ISP
(PPP, DSL, Cablemodems, etc.), you CANNOT load this strong ruleset upon
booting. You will either need to reload this firewall ruleset EVERY TIME
you get a new IP address or make your /etc/rc.d/
rc.firewall-ipchains-stronger ruleset more intelligent. To do this for
various types of connections such as PPP or DHCP users, please see the
Section 7.8 FAQ entry for all the details.




/etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-*
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|#echo "Enabling PORTFW Redirection on the external LAN.." |
|# |
|# This will forward ALL port 80 traffic from the external IP address |
|# to port 80 on the 192.168.0.10 machine |
|# |
|# Be SURE that when you add these new rules to your rc.firewall-*, you |
|# add them before a direct or implict DROP or REJECT. |
|# |
|PORTFWIP="192.168.0.10" |
| |
| |
|# NOTE: If you are using the basic rc.firewall-iptables ruleset, you |
|# will need to enable the following EXTIP option. Users of the |
|# rc.firewall-iptables-stronger ruleset already have this defined. |
|# |
|# *PLEASE* look over the rc.firewall-iptables-stronger ruleset for more |
|# specific issues regarding dynamic vs. static IP addresses |
|# |
|# |
|# Determine the external IP automatically: |
|# ---------------------------------------- |
|# |
|# The following line will determine your external IP address. This |
|# line is somewhat complex and confusing but it will also work for |
|# all NON-English Linux distributions: |
|# |
|# DISABLED by default -- to enable, REMOVE both the "#" characters below |
|# |
|#EXTIP="`$IFCONFIG $EXTIF | $AWK \ |
|#/$EXTIF/'{next}//{split($0,a,":");split(a[2],a," ");print a[1];exit}'`" |
| |
| |
|# Allow forwarding of new and existing port 80 connections from the external |
|# interface. This rule is required as our default FORWARD policy is DENY. |
|# |
|$IPTABLES -A FORWARD -i $EXTIF -o $INTIF -p tcp --dport 80 -m state \ |
| --state NEW,ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT |
| |
| |
|#Enable PORTFW of this port 80 traffic from the external interface |
|# |
|$IPTABLES -A PREROUTING -t nat -p tcp -d $EXTIP --dport 80 -m state \ |
| --state NEW,ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j DNAT --to $PORTFWIP:80 |
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+

That's it! Just re-run your /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-iptables ruleset and test
it out! If you would like to learn more about this, please see the Section
7.19

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Running the rc.firewall-iptables-stronger ruleset? Good for you! To get
PORTFW running with this ruleset, it's very easy. The following example is
for HTTP (WWW) traffic to be PORTFWed to the IP address indicated by the
$PORTFWIP variable:

* Take the ruleset lines shown above (for the generic rc.firewall-*
ruleset) and place them just *after* the "#FORWARD Enable Forwarding and
thus IPMASQ" comment lines. It should also be noted that you DO NOT have
to enable the "HTTPD" rules under the "Optional 'INPUT' section" for
2.4-based kernels. With 2.4 kernels, those lines are ONLY used if you
want to allow HTTP traffic to terminate on the MASQ server's own local
httpd process (usually Apache).


PORTFW FTP: If you have the "ip_conntrack_ftp" and "ip_nat_ftp" kernel
modules loaded into kernel space (as already done in the rc.firewall-iptables
script), the simple PREROUTING command like the one shown above changed for
for port "21" should do the trick. This is much easier than the configuration
for the older IPCHAINS / IPFWADM tools for the 2.2.x / 2.0.x kernels!

Please note, if you setup PORTFW to redirect traffic to an internal FTP
server that is running on a NON-standard FTP port, say port 8021 instead of
the usual port 21, you MUST tell the "ip_conntrack_ftp" module to be aware of
the new FTP port. The reason for this configuration change is that FTP is not
a NAT-friendly protocol. By telling the FTP NAT module about this
non-standard FTP port, the NAT module and do it's job again. To enable this,
edit your rc.firewall-* file and change the loading of the FTP module to look
something like this:

+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|/sbin/insmod ip_conntrack_ftp ports=21,8021 |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

PORTFW Redirection of Internal requests:

In the past, if users PORTFWed port 80 on their EXTERNAL IP address to some
internal machine, only the machines out on the Internet would be able to
properly reach this internal WWW server. If you tried to contact this
internal WWW server via the MASQ server's EXTERNAL address, it would fail.
Fortunately, there are workarounds for all Linux kernels. IPTABLES for the
2.6.x and 2.4.x kernels supports this functionality natively. IPCHAINS
support for the 2.2.x kernels and IPFWADM support for the 2.0.x kernels need
to use the external REDIR tool (not currently covered in the HOWTO). For
those of you who understand IPTABLES fairly well, the rule of thumb is a
PREROUTING/DNAT rule is for enabling PORTFW from *external* machines and a
POSTROUTING/SNAT rule is for enabling PORTFW from *internal* machines.

To support redirection like this from an internal host, add a rule like the
one shown below ABOVE the "Catch all" FORWARDing rule in the rc.firewall-*
file. The following example will REDIRECT all external as well as internal
WWW traffic to the internal machine noted as PORTFWIP (192.168.0.10). This
traffic will have the source IP address of the IP Masq server's internal IP
address. Please change the IP address of the PORTFWIP variable to reflect
your specific configuration:

+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|#The following rule should be configured in *addition* to the above rule |
|# for enabling external to internal PORTFWing |
| |
|$IPTABLES -t nat -A POSTROUTING -d $PORTFWIP -s $INTLAN -p tcp \ |
|--dport 80 -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j SNAT \ |
|--to $INTIP |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

6.7.2. IPMASQADM-based PORTFWD'ing: Using IPMASQADM with 2.2.x kernels

First, make sure you have the newest 2.2.x kernel uncompressed into /usr/src/
kernel/linux. If you haven't already done this, please see Section 3.2.2
section for full details. Next, download the "ipmasqadm.c" program from
Section 2.7 into the /usr/src/kernel directory.

Next, you'll need to compile the 2.2.x kernel as shown in Section 3.2.2
section. Be sure to say "YES" to the IPPORTFW option when you configure the
kernel. Once the kernel compile is complete and you have rebooted, return to
this section.

Now, compile and install the IPMASQADM tool:

+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| cd /usr/src |
| tar xzvf ipmasqadm-x.tgz |
| cd ipmasqadm-x |
| make |
| make install |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Now, for this example, we are going to allow ALL WWW Internet traffic (port
80) hitting your Internet TCP/IP address to be forwarded to the internal
Masqueraded machine at IP address 192.168.0.10.

PORTFW FTP: As mentioned above, there are two solutions for forwarding FTP
server traffic to an internal MASQed PC. The first solution *IS* a BETA level
IP_MASQ_FTP module for 2.2.x kernels to PORT Forward FTP connections to an
internal MASQed FTP server. The other method is using a FTP proxy program
(the URL is in Section 2.7. It should also be noted that the FTP kernel
module also supports the adding of additional PORTFW FTP ports on the fly
without the requirement of unloading and reloading the IP_MASQ_FTP module and
thus breaking any existing FTP transfers. You can find more about this new
code at the IPMASQ WWW site at [http://ipmasq.webhop.net] http://
ipmasq.webhop.net;. There are also examples and some additional information
about PORTFWed FTP connection below in the 2.0.x. kernel section.

NOTE: Once you enable a port forwarder on port 80, that port can no longer be
used by the Linux IP Masquerade server. To be more specific, if you have a
WWW server already running on the MASQ server, a port forward will now give
all Internet users the WWW pages from the -INTERNAL- WWW server and not the
pages on your IP MASQ server.

Anyway, to enable port forwarding for HTTPd:

* Edit the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-* ruleset and ENABLE the "Optional" "HTTP"
sections in both the INPUT and OUTPUT subsections.

* Add the following lines shown below JUST BELOW the "ipchains -P forward
DENY" rule (in the "Optional FORWARD section"). Be sure to replace the
"$EXTIP" variable's contents with your EXTERNAL Internet IP address on
the IPMASQ server.


NOTE #2: If you get a dynamically assigned TCP/IP address from your ISP (PPP,
DSL, Cablemodems, etc.), you CANNOT load this strong ruleset upon booting.
You will either need to reload this firewall ruleset EVERY TIME you get a new
IP address or make your /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipchains-stronger ruleset more
intelligent. To do this for various types of connections such as PPP or DHCP
users, please see the Section 7.8 FAQ entry for all the details.

/etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-*
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|#echo "Enabling IPPORTFW Redirection on the external LAN.." |
|# |
|# This will forward ALL port 80 traffic from the external IP address |
|# to port 80 on the 192.168.0.10 machine |
|# |
|PORTFWIP="192.168.0.10" |
| |
|/usr/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -f |
|/usr/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L $EXTIP 80 -R $PORTFWIP 80 |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+


That's it! Just re-run your /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-* ruleset and test it out!

If you get the error message "ipchains: setsockopt failed: Protocol not
available", you AREN'T running your new IPPORTFW enabled kernel. Make sure
that you moved the new kernel over, re-run LILO, and then reboot again. If
you are sure you are running your new kernel, run the command "ls /proc/net/
ip_masq" and make sure the "portfw" file exists. If it doesn't, you must have
made an error when configuring your kernel. Try again.

PORTFW Redirection of Internal requests:

It should be mention that this IPMASQ HOWTO currently does *NOT* provide any
explination or examples on how to use the REDIR tool. If you need help
setting it up for 2.2.x kernels, send me an email. For those who want to
understand why PORTFW cannot redirect traffic for both external and internal
interfaces (what the REDIR tool fixes), here is an email from Juanjo that
better explains it.


From Juanjo Ciarlante
--

>If I use:
>
> ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 1.2.3.4 80 -R 192.168.2.3 80
>
>Everything works great from the outside but internal requests for the same
>1.2.3.4 address fail. Are there chains that will allow a machine on localnet
>192.168.2.0 to accesss www.periapt.com without using a proxy?

Actually not.

I usually setup a ipmasqadm rule for outside, *AND* a port
redirector for inside. This works because ipmasqadm hooks before
redir will get the eventual outside connection, _but_ leaves things
ok if not (stated by APPROPIATE rules).

The actual "conceptual" problem comes from the TRUE client (peer) IP
goal (thanks to masq) being in the same net as target server.

The failing scenario for "local masq" is :
client: 192.168.2.100
masq: 192.168.2.1
serv: 192.168.2.10

1)client->server packet
a) client: 192.168.2.100:1025 -> 192.168.2.1:80 [SYN]
b) (masq): 192.168.2.100:1025 -> 192.168.2.10:80 [SYN]
(and keep 192.168.2.1:61000 192.168.2.100:1025 related)
c) serv: gets masqed packet (1b)

2)server->client packet
a) serv: 192.168.2.10:80 -> 192.168.2.100:1025 [SYN,ACK]
b) client: 192.168.2.100:1025 -> 192.168.2.10:80 [RST]

Now take a moment to compare (1a) with (2a).
You see, the server replied DIRECTLY to client bypassing masq (not
letting masq to UNDO the packet hacking) because it is in SAME net, so
the client resets the connection.

hope I helped.

Warm regards
Juanjo

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

6.7.3. IPPORTFW-based PORTFWD'ing: Using IPPORTFW on 2.0.x kernels

First, make sure you have the newest 2.0.x kernel uncompressed into /usr/src/
kernel. If you haven't already done this, please see Section 3.2.3 for full
details. Next, download the "ipportfw.c" program and the "subs-patch-x.gz"
kernel patch from Section 3.2.3 into the /usr/src/ directory.

NOTE: Please replace the "x" in the "subs-patch-x.gz" file name with the most
current version available on the site.

Next, if you plan on port forwarding FTP traffic to an internal server, you
will have to apply an additional NEW IP_MASQ_FTP module patch found in
Section 3.2.3. More details regarding this are later in this section. Please
note that this is NOT the same patch as for the 2.2.x kernels so some
functionality such as the dynamic FTP PORT functionality is not present.

Now, copy the IPPORTFW patch (subs-patch-x.gz) into the Linux directory
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| cp /usr/src/subs-patch-1.37.gz /usr/src/linux |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Next, apply the kernel patch to create the IPPORTFW kernel option:
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| cd /usr/src/linux |
| zcat subs-patch-1.3x.gz | patch -p1 |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Ok, time to compile the kernel as shown in Section 3.2.3. Be sure to say YES
to the IPPORTFW option now available when you configure the kernel. Once the
compile is complete and you have rebooted, return to this section.

Now with a newly compiled kernel, please compile and install the actual
"IPPORTFW" program
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| cd /usr/src |
| gcc ipportfw.c -o ipportfw |
| mv ipportfw /usr/local/sbin |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Now, for this example, we are going to allow ALL WWW Internet traffic (port
80) hitting your Internet TCP/IP address to then be forwarded to the internal
Masqueraded machine at IP address 192.168.0.10.

NOTE: Once you enable a port forwarder on port 80, that port can no longer be
used by the Linux IP Masquerade server. To be more specific, if you have a
WWW server already running on the MASQ server and then you port forward port
80 to an internal MASQed computer, ALL internet users will see the WWW pages
pages from the -INTERNAL- WWW server and not the pages on your IP MASQ
server. This only performs a port forward to some other port, say 8080, to
your internal MASQ machine. Though this will work, all Internet users will
have to append :8080 to the URL to then contact the internal MASQed WWW
server.

Anyway, to enable port forwarding, edit the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-* ruleset.
Add the follow lines but be sure to replace the word "$extip" with your
Internet IP address.

NOTE #2: If you get a dynamically assigned TCP/IP address from your ISP (PPP,
DSL, Cablemodems, etc.), you CANNOT load this strong ruleset upon booting.
You will either need to reload this firewall ruleset EVERY TIME you get a new
IP address or make your /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-ipchains-stronger ruleset more
intelligent. To do this for various types of connections such as PPP or DHCP
users, please see the Section 7.8 FAQ entry for all the details.

/etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-*
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|#echo "Enabling IPPORTFW Redirection on the external LAN.." |
|# |
|# This will forward ALL port 80 traffic from the external IP address |
|# to port 80 on the 192.168.0.10 machine |
|# |
|/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -C |
|/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t$extip/80 -R 192.168.0.10/80 |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

That's it! Just re-run your /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-* ruleset and test it out!

If you get the error message "ipfwadm: setsockopt failed: Protocol not
available", you AREN'T running your new kernel. Make sure that you moved the
new kernel over, re-run LILO, and then reboot again.

Port Forwarding FTP servers:

If you plan on port forwarding FTP to an internal machine, things get more
complicated. The reason for this is because the standard IP_MASQ_FTP kernel
module wasn't written for this though some users report that it works without
any problems. Personally, without the patch, I've heard that extended file
transfers in excess of 30 minutes will fail without the patch while other
users swear that it works flawlessly. Anyway, I recommend that you try the
following PORTFW instruction with the STOCK ip_masq_ftp module and see if it
works for you. If it doesn't, try using the modified ip_masq_ftp module.

For those who need the module, Fred Viles wrote a modified IP_MASQ_FTP module
to make things work. If you are curious what EXACTLY are the issues, download
the following archive since Fred documents it quite well. Also understand
that this patch is somewhat experimental and should be treated as such. It
should be noted that this patch is ONLY available for the 2.0.x kernels
though there is a different patch available for 2.2.x kernels.

So, to get the 2.0.x patch working, you need to:

* FIRST, apply the IPPORTFW kernel patch as shown earlier in this section.

* Download the "msqsrv-patch-36" from Fred Viles's FTP server in Section
3.2.3and put it into /usr/src/linux.

* Patch the kernel with this new code by running "cat msqsrv-patch-36 |
patch -p1"

* Next, replace the original "ip_masq_ftp.c" kernel module with the new one

mv /usr/src/linux/net/ipv4/ip_masq_ftp.c /usr/src/linux/net/ipv4/
ip_masq_ftp.c.orig

mv /usr/src/linux/ip_masq_ftp.c /usr/src/linux/net/ipv4/ip_masq_ftp.c

* Lastly, build and install the kernel with this new code in place.


Once this is complete, edit the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-* ruleset and add the
following lines, but be sure to replace the word "$extip" with your Internet
IP address.

This example, like the one above, will allow ALL FTP Internet traffic (port
21) hitting your Internet TCP/IP address to then be forwarded to the internal
Masqueraded machine at IP address 192.168.0.10.

NOTE: Once you enable a port forwarder on port 21, that port can no longer be
used by the Linux IP Masquerade server. To be more specific, if you have an
FTP server already running on the MASQ server, a port forward will now give
all Internet users the FTP files from the -INTERNAL- FTP server and not the
files on your IP MASQ server.

/etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-*
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|#echo "Enabling IPPORTFW Redirection on the external LAN.." |
|# |
|/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -C |
|/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t$extip/21 -R 192.168.0.10/21 |
| |
|#NOTE: If you are using multiple local port numbers to PORTFW |
|# to multuple internal FTP servers (say, 21, 2121, 2112, |
|# etc, you need to configure the ip_masq_ftp nodule to |
|# listen to these ports. To do this, edit the |
|# /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-* script as shown in this HOWTO |
|# to look like: |
|# |
|# /sbin/modprobe ip_masq_ftp ports=21,2121,2112 |
|# |
|# Re-run the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-* script for these changes to |
|# take effect. |
| |
| |
|#Please note that PORTFWing port 20 is probably NOT required |
|# for ACTIVE connections as the internal FTP server will |
|# initiate this port 20 connection and it will be properly |
|# handled by the classic MASQ mechanisms. |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

That's it! Just re-run your /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-* ruleset and test it out!

PORTFW Redirection of Internal requests:

It's not clear if the REDIR tool will compile or work against legacy 2.0.x
kernels. It should also be mentioned that this IPMASQ HOWTO currently does *
NOT* provide any explination or examples on how to use the REDIR tool. If you
need help setting it up, send me an email. If you would like to learn more
about REDIR, please see the above section for the 2.2.x kernels.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

6.8. CU-SeeMe and Linux IP-Masquerade

Linux IP Masquerade supports CuSeeme via the "ip_masq_cuseeme" kernel module.
This kernel modules should be loaded in the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-* script.
Once the "ip_masq_cuseeme" module is installed, you should be able to both
initiate and receive CuSeeme connections to remote reflectors and/or users.

NOTE: It is recommended to use the IPPORTFW tool instead of the old IPAUTOFW
tool for running CuSeeme.

If you need more explicit information on configuring CuSeeme, see Michael
Owings's CuSeeMe page for a Mini-HOWTO or The IP Masquerade Resources for a
mirror of the Mini-HOWTO.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

6.9. Mirabilis ICQ

ICQ, the instant messaging client now owned by AOL, has changed over the
years. All modern ICQ clients are NAT friendly and thus DON'T require any
special NAT modules, PORTFW tricks, etc.

IF, for some reason, you want to run an OLD ICQ client, you can read this
section. If not, just IGNORE all this info. I am leaving this in the HOWTO
demonstrate large a LARGE PORTFW example.

There are three methods of getting ICQ to work behind a Linux MASQ server.
These solutions include the use the ICQ Masq module (for 2.2.x and 2.0.x
kernels), using IPPORTFW for basic ICQ functionality, or setting up a SOCKS
proxy server.

MODULE: The ICQ module was written for the older generation of ICQ clients
for both the 2.2.x and 2.0.x kernels. This module allows for the simple setup
of multiple ICQ users behind a MASQ server. It also doesn't require any
special changes to the ICQ client(s). Recently, AOL changed the protocol and
ports used for ICQ. Because of this, many users might find that the
ip_masq_icq module will no longer help them. For users of the older ICQ
clients, the 2.2.x version of the module supports file transfer and read-time
chat. The 2.0.x kernel module doesn't support file transfers and there is no
module available for the 2.4.x kernels.

PORTFW: Your next option is to use port forwarding. With port forwarding,
basic ICQ chat will work but file transfers might not be very reliable.
Please see below for an example of how to configure ICQ PORTFW.

SOCKS: Finally, your last and possibly best option is to setup a SOCKS proxy
server on your Linux machine. This service can happily co-exist with the MASQ
service and ICQ should be fully functional regardless of what Linux kernel
version you are running. The use of a SOCKS server will require ALL ICQ
clients to be reconfigured to use it and the installation and configuration
of a SOCKS server has nothing to do with IP Masquerade. Because of this,
SOCKS is not covered in this HOWTO.

If you are interested in Andrew Deryabin's [mailto:djsf@usa.net] djsf@usa.net
ICQ IP Masq module for the 2.2.x and 2.0.x kernels, please see Section 2.7
for details.

To use port forwarding (PORFW)for ICQ, you will have to make some changes on
both Linux and ICQ clients but all ICQ messaging, URLs, chat, and some file
transfers should work.

* First, you need to be running a Linux kernel with IPPPORTFW enabled.
Please see Section 6.7for more details.

* Next, you need to add the following lines to your /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-*
file. This example assumes that 10.1.2.3 is your external Internet IP
address and your internal MASQed ICQ machine is 192.168.0.10:

* The following example is for a 2.2.x kernel with IPCHAINS:

I have included two examples here for the user: Either one would work
fine:

Example #1
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2000 -R 192.168.0.10 2000
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2001 -R 192.168.0.10 2001
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2002 -R 192.168.0.10 2002
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2003 -R 192.168.0.10 2003
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2004 -R 192.168.0.10 2004
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2005 -R 192.168.0.10 2005
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2006 -R 192.168.0.10 2006
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2007 -R 192.168.0.10 2007
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2008 -R 192.168.0.10 2008
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2009 -R 192.168.0.10 2009
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2010 -R 192.168.0.10 2010
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2011 -R 192.168.0.10 2011
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2012 -R 192.168.0.10 2012
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2013 -R 192.168.0.10 2013
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2014 -R 192.168.0.10 2014
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2015 -R 192.168.0.10 2015
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2016 -R 192.168.0.10 2016
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2017 -R 192.168.0.10 2017
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2018 -R 192.168.0.10 2018
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2019 -R 192.168.0.10 2019
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 2020 -R 192.168.0.10 2020

Example #2
port=2000
while [ $port -le 2020 ]
do
/usr/local/sbin/ipmasqadm portfw -a -P tcp -L 10.1.2.3 $port -R 192.168.0.10 $port
port=$((port+1))
done


* The following example is for a 2.0.x kernel with IPFWADM:

I have included two examples here for the user: Either one would work
fine:

Example #1
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2000 -R 192.168.0.10/2000
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2001 -R 192.168.0.10/2001
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2002 -R 192.168.0.10/2002
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2003 -R 192.168.0.10/2003
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2004 -R 192.168.0.10/2004
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2005 -R 192.168.0.10/2005
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2006 -R 192.168.0.10/2006
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2007 -R 192.168.0.10/2007
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2008 -R 192.168.0.10/2008
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2009 -R 192.168.0.10/2009
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2010 -R 192.168.0.10/2010
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2011 -R 192.168.0.10/2011
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2012 -R 192.168.0.10/2012
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2013 -R 192.168.0.10/2013
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2014 -R 192.168.0.10/2014
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2015 -R 192.168.0.10/2015
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2016 -R 192.168.0.10/2016
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2017 -R 192.168.0.10/2017
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2018 -R 192.168.0.10/2018
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2019 -R 192.168.0.10/2019
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A -t10.1.2.3/2020 -R 192.168.0.10/2020


Example #2
port=2000
while [ $port -le 2020 ]
do
/usr/local/sbin/ipportfw -A t10.1.2.3/$port -R 192.168.0.10/$port
port=$((port+1))
done


* Once your new rc.firewall-* is ready, reload the ruleset to make sure
things are OK by simply typing in "/etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-*". If you get
any errors, you either don't have IPPORTFW support in the kernel or you
made a typo in the rc.firewall file.

* Now, in ICQ's Preferences-->Connection, configure it to be "Behind a LAN"
and "Behind a firewall or Proxy". Now, click on "Firewall Settings" and
configure it to be "I don't use a SOCK5 proxy". Also note that it was
previously recommended to change ICQ's "Firewall session timeouts" to
"30" seconds BUT many users have found that ICQ becomes unreliable. It
has been found that ICQ is more reliable with its stock timeout setting
(don't enable that ICQ option) and simply change MASQ's timeout to 160
seconds. You can see how to change this timeout in Section 3.4.3 and
Section 3.4.2 rulesets. Finally, click on Next and configure ICQ to "Use
the following TCP listen ports.." from "2000" to "2020". Now click done.

Now ICQ will tell you that you will have to restart ICQ for the changes
to take effect. To be honest, I had to REBOOT the Windows9x machine in
order for things to work right but some users might say otherwise. So..
try it both ways.

* A user once told me that by simply portforwarding port 4000 to his ICQ
machine, it worked perfectly. He reported that EVERYTHING worked fine
(even chat, file transfers, etc) WITHOUT re-configuring ICQ from its
default settings. Your mileage might vary on this topic but I thought you
might like to hear about this alternative configuration.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
6.10. Gamers: The LooseUDP patch

The LooseUDP patch allows semi-NAT-friendly games that usually use UDP
connections to both WORK behind a Linux IP Masquerade server.

What the LooseUDP patch does is allow ALL UDP packets to be NATed through the
MASQ box without any checks or expiration. This liberal forwarding method is
considered insecure by many and is disabled in modern 2.2.x kernels. The
2.4.x kernels with it's IPTABLES stateful UDP inspection only allows incoming
UDP packets into the machine (and thus MASQ) if there was already an outbound
UDP packet to that same host in it's stateful table. If the MASQ host hasn't
sent a UDP packet to the remote host within ~30 seconds, the return UDP table
entry is deleted. Because of this, IPTABLES removes most of the need for the
LooseUDP patch as it does it in a more secure fashion.

Currently, LooseUDP is available as a patch for 2.0.36+ kernels and it is
already built into 2.2.3+ kernels though it is now DISABLED by DEFAULT in
2.2.16+ (please see the example rc.firewal ruleset comments for details).

To get LooseUDP running on a 2.0.x kernel, follow the following steps:

* Have the newest 2.0.x kernel sources uncompressed in the /usr/src/linux
directory

* ABSOLUTELY REQUIRED for v2.0.x: Download and install the IPPORTFW patch
from Section 3.2.3and as described in Section 6.7of the HOWTO.

* Download the LooseUDP patch from Section 3.2.3

Now, put the LooseUDP patch in the /usr/src/linux directory. Once this is
done, type in:

+------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|For a compressed patch file: zcat loose-udp-2.0.36.patch.gz | patch -p1|
+------------------------------------------------------------------------+

+------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|For a NON-compressed patch file: cat loose-udp-2.0.36.patch | patch -p1|
+------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Now, depending on the version of your "patch", You will then see the
following text:

+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|patching file `CREDITS' |
|patching file `Documentation/Configure.help' |
|patching file `include/net/ip_masq.h' |
|patching file `net/ipv4/Config.in' |
|patching file `net/ipv4/ip_masq.c' |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

* If you see the text "Hunk FAILED" only ONCE and ONLY ONCE at the very
beginning of the patching, don't be alarmed. You probably have an old
patch file (this has been fixed) but it still works. If it fails
completely, make sure you have applied the IPPORTFW kernel patch FIRST.

Once the patch is installed, re-configure the kernel as shown in Section
3.2.3 and be sure to say "Y" to the "IP: loose UDP port managing
(EXPERIMENTAL) (CONFIG_IP_MASQ_LOOSE_UDP) [Y/n/?]" option.




To get LooseUDP running on a 2.2.x kernel, follow the following steps:

* In the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-* script, goto the BOTTOM of the file and
find the LooseUDP section. Change the "0" in the line: echo "0" > /proc/
sys/net/ipv4/ip_masq_udp_dloose to a "1" and re-run the rc.firewall-*
ruleset. An example of this is given in both Section 3.4.2 example and
Section 6.4.3 example.




NOTE: The LooseUDP code is /not/ available (?required?) for the 2.4.x kernels

* See the begining of this section for all the details. Basically, the old
2.0.x / 2.2.x LooseUDP code was considered a security issue. Because of
this, it was removed from the kernel. Fortunately, some games that used
to require the LooseUDP code on the 2.2.x IPCHAINS system might work just
final under the 2.4.x IPTABLES kernels. If the games don't work, I'm not
aware of a solution for you. Sorry.


Once you are running the new LooseUDP enabled kernel, you should be good to
go for most NAT-friendly games. Some URLs have been given for patches to make
games like BattleZone and others NAT friendly. Please see Section 6.3.1 for
more details.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Chapter 7. Frequently Asked Questions

If you can think of any useful FAQ suggestions, please send it to [mailto:
dranch@trinnet.net] dranch@trinnet.net. Please clearly state the question and
an appropriate answer (if you have it). Thank you!
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.1. ( Distro ) - What Linux Distributions support IP Masquerading?

If your Linux distribution doesn't support IP MASQ out of the box, don't
worry. All you have to do is to re-compile the kernel as shown above in this
HOWTO.

NOTE: If you can help us fill out this table, please email [mailto:
dranch@trinnet.net] dranch@trinnet.net.



* Caldera < v1.2 : NO - ?

* Caldera v1.3 : YES - 2.0.35 based

* Caldera v2.2 : YES - 2.2.5 based

* Caldera eServer v2.3 : YES - ? based

* Debian v1.3 : NO - ?

* Debian v2.0 : NO - ?

* Debian v2.1 : YES - 2.2.1 based

* Debian v2.2 : YES - 2.2.15 based

* Debian v3.0 : YES - 2.4.18 based

* DLX Linux v? : ? - ?

* DOS Linux v? : ? - ?

* FloppyFW v1.0.2 : ? - ?

* Gentoo v1.4 : YES - ? Based

* Hal91 Linux v? : ? - ?

* Linux PPC vR4 : NO - ?

* Linux Pro v? : ? - ?

* LinuxWare v? : ? - ?

* Mandrake v5.3 : YES - ?

* Mandrake v6.0 : YES - 2.2.5

* Mandrake v6.1 : YES - ?

* Mandrake v7.0 : YES - 2.2.14

* Mandrake v7.1 : YES - 2.2.15

* Mandrake v7.2 : YES - 2.2.17

* Mandrake v8.0 : YES - ?

* Mandrake v8.1 : YES - 2.4.8

* Mandrake v8.2 : YES - ?

* Mandrake v9.0 : YES - ?

* Mandrake v9.1 : YES - 2.4.21-pre

* MkLinux v? : ? - ?

* MuLinux v3rl : YES - ?

* Redhat < v4.x : NO - ?

* Redhat v5.0 : YES - ?

* Redhat v5.1 : YES - 2.0.34 based

* Redhat v5.2 : YES - 2.0.36 based

* Redhat v6.0 : YES - 2.2.5 based

* Redhat v6.1 : YES - 2.2.12 based

* Redhat v6.2 : YES - 2.2.14 based

* Redhat v7.0 : YES - 2.2.16 based

* Redhat v7.2 : YES - 2.4.7 based

* Redhat v7.3 : YES - 2.4.? based

* Redhat v8.0 : YES - 2.4.18? based

* Redhat v9.0 : YES - 2.4.20 based

* Slackware v3.0 : ? - ?

* Slackware v3.1 : ? - ?

* Slackware v3.2 : ? - ?

* Slackware v3.3 : ? - 2.0.34 based

* Slackware v3.4 : ? - ?

* Slackware v3.5 : ? - ?

* Slackware v3.6 : ? - ?

* Slackware v3.9 : ? - 2.0.37pre10 based

* Slackware v4.0 : YES - 2.2.6 based

* Slackware v7.0 : YES - 2.2.13 based

* Slackware v7.1 : YES - 2.2.16 based

* Slackware v8.0 : YES - 2.4.17 based

* Slackware v8.1 : YES - ? based

* Stampede Linux v? : ? - ?

* SuSE v5.2 : YES - 2.0.32 base

* SuSE v5.3 : YES - ?

* SuSE v6.0 : YES - 2.0.36 based

* SuSE v6.1 : YES - 2.2.5 based

* SuSE v6.3 : YES - 2.2.13 based

* Tomsrbt Linux v? : ? - ?

* TurboLinux Lite v4.0 : YES - ?

* TurboLinux v6.0 : YES - 2.2.12 based

* TriLinux v? : ? - ?

* Yggdrasil Linux v? : ? - ?



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.2. ( Requirements ) - What are the minimum hardware requirements and any
limitations for IP Masquerade? How well does it perform?

A 486/66 box with 16MB of RAM was more than sufficient to fill a 1.54Mb/s T1
100%! MASQ has also been known to run quite well on 386SX-16s with 8MB of
RAM. Yet, it should be noted that Linux IP Masquerade starts thrashing the
system with more than 500 MASQ entries.

The only application that I know which can temporarily break Linux IP
Masquerade, is GameSpy. Why? When it refreshes its lists, it creates 10,000s
of quick connections in a VERY short period of time. Until these sessions
timeout, the MASQ tables become "FULL". See Section 7.23 of the FAQ for more
details.

While we are at it:

There is a hard limit of 4096 concurrent connections each for TCP & UDP. This
limit can be changed by fiddling the values in /usr/src/linux/net/ipv4/
ip_masq.h - a maximum limit of 32000 should by OK. If you want to change the
limit - you need to change the PORT_MASQ_BEGIN & PORT_MASQ_END values to get
an appropriately sized range above 32K and below 64K.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.3. ( Errors ) - When I run my specific rc.firewall-* ruleset, I get
"command not found" errors. Why?

First off, when I say rc.firewall-*, what I really mean is to use one of the
various types of firewall rulesets depending on what kernel version you're
running. Your options from this HOWTO include: rc.firewall-iptables or
rc.firewall-iptables-stronger or rc.firewall-ipchains or
rc.firewall-ipchains-stronger or rc.firewall-ipfwadm or
rc.firewall-ipfwadm-stronger.

Next, how did you put the rc.firewall-* onto your machine? Did you cut&paste
it into a TELNET window, FTP it from a Windows/DOS machine, etc? Try this..
log into your Linux box and run "vim -b /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-*" and see if
all your lines end in a ^M. If they do, delete all the ^M and try again.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.4. ( Still wont work ) - I've checked all my configurations, I still can't
get IP Masquerade to work. What should I do?



* Stay calm. Get yourself a cup of tea, coffee, soda, etc., and have a
rest. Once your mind is clear, try the suggestions mentioned below.
Setting up Linux IP Masquerading is NOT hard but there are several
concepts that will be new to you.

* Again, go through all the steps in Chapter 5. 99% of all first-time
Masquerade users who have problems haven't looked here.

* Check the IP Masquerade Mailing List Archives, most likely your questions
or problems are a common one and can be found in a simple Archive search.

* Check out the [http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/
index-linux.html#TrinityOS] TrinityOS document. It covers IP Masquerading
for both the 2.0.x and 2.2.x kernels and MANY other topics including
PPPd, DialD, DHCP, DNS, Sendmail, etc.

* Make sure that you aren't running ROUTED or GATED. To verify, run "ps aux
| grep -e routed -e gated"

* Post your question to the IP Masquerade Mailing List (see next the FAQ
section for details). Please only use this if you cannot find the answer
from the IP Masquerading Archive. Be sure to include all the information
requested in Chapter 5 in your email!!

* Post your question to a related Linux NNTP newsgroup.

* Send email to [mailto:ambrose@writeme.com] ambrose@writeme.com and
[mailto:dranch@trinnet.net] dranch@trinnet.net. You have a better chance
of getting a reply from the IP Masquerading Email list than either of us.

* Check your configurations again :-)



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.5. ( Email list ) - How do I join or view the IP Masquerade and/or IP
Masqurade Developers mailing lists and archives?

There are two ways to join the two Linux IP Masquerading mailing lists. The
first way is to send an email to [mailto:masq-request@indyramp.com]
masq-request@indyramp.com. To join the Linux IP Masquerading Developers
mailing list, send an email to [mailto:masq-dev-request@indyramp.com]
masq-dev-request@indyramp.com. Please see the bullet below for more details.



* Subscribe via email: Now put the word "subscribe" in either the subject
or body of the e-mail message. If you want to only subscribe to the
Digest version of either the main MASQ or MASQ-DEV list (all e-mails on
the given list during the week are sent to you in one big email), put the
words "subscribe digest" in either the subject or body of the e-mail
message.

Once the server receives your request, it will subscribe you to your
requested list and give you a PASSWORD. Save this password as you will
need it to later unsubscribe from the list or change your options.




The second method is to use a WWW browser and subscribe via a form at [http:/
/home.indyramp.net/mailman/listinfo/masq] http://home.indyramp.net/mailman/
listinfo/masq for the main MASQ list or [http://home.indyramp.net/mailman/
listinfo/masq-dev] http://home.indyramp.net/mailman/listinfo/masq-dev for the
MASQ-DEV list.

Once subscribed, you will get emails from your subscribed list. It should be
also noted that both subscribed and NON-subscribed users can access the two
list's archives. To do this, please see the above two WWW URLs for more
details.

Lastly, please note that you can only post to the MASQ list from the original
account/address you used to subscribe.

If you have any problems regarding the mailing list or the mailing list
archive, please contact Robert Novak.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.6. ( NAT vs. Proxy ) - How does IP Masquerade differ from Proxy or NAT
services?

Proxy: Proxy servers are available for: Win95, NT, Linux, Solaris, etc.

Pro: + (1) IP address ; cheap
+ Optional caching for better performance (WWW, etc.)

Con: - All applications behind the proxy server must both SUPPORT
proxy services (SOCKS) and be CONFIGURED to use the Proxy
server
- Screws up WWW counters and WWW statistics

A proxy server uses only (1) public IP address, like IP MASQ, and acts
as a translator to clients on the private LAN (WWW browser, etc.).
This proxy server receives requests like TELNET, FTP, WWW,
etc. from the private network on one interface. It would then in turn,
initiate these requests as if someone on the local box was making the
requests. Once the remote Internet server sends back the requested
information, it would re-translate the TCP/IP addresses back to the
internal MASQ client and send traffic to the internal requesting host.
This is why it is called a PROXY server.

Note: ANY applications that you might want to use on the
internal machines *MUST* have proxy server support
like Netscape and some of the better TELNET and FTP
clients. Any clients that don't support proxy servers
won't work.

Another nice thing about proxy servers is that some of them
can also do caching (Squid for WWW). So, imagine that you have 50
proxied hosts all loading Netscape at once. If they were installed
with the default homepage URL, you would have 50 copies of the same
Netscape WWW page coming over the WAN link for each respective computer.
With a caching proxy server, only one copy would be downloaded by the
proxy server and then the proxied machines would get the WWW page from
the cache. Not only does this save bandwidth on the Internet
connection, it will be MUCH MUCH faster for the internal proxied
machines.



MASQ: IP Masq is available on Linux and a few ISDN routers such
or as the Zytel Prestige128, Cisco 770, NetGear ISDN routers, etc.
1:Many
NAT
Pro: + Only (1) IP address needed (cheap)
+ Doesn't require special application support
+ Uses firewall software so your network can become
more secure

Con: - Requires a Linux box or special ISDN router
(though other products might have this.. )
- Incoming traffic cannot access your internal LAN
unless the internal LAN initiates the traffic or
specific port forwarding software is installed.
Many NAT servers CANNOT provide this functionality.
- Special protocols need to be uniquely handled by
firewall redirectors, etc. Linux has full support
for this (FTP, IRC, etc.) capabilty but many routers
do NOT (NetGear DOES).

Masq or 1:Many NAT is similar to a proxy server in the sense that the
server will perform IP address translation and fake out the remote server
(WWW for example) as if the MASQ server made the request instead of an
internal machine.

The major difference between a MASQ and PROXY server is that MASQ servers
don't need any configuration changes to all the client machines. Just
configure them to use the linux box as their default gateway and everything
will work fine. You WILL need to install special Linux modules for things
like RealAudio, FTP, etc. to work)!

Also, many users operate IP MASQ for TELNET, FTP, etc. *AND* also setup a
caching proxy on the same Linux box for WWW traffic for the additional
performance.


NAT: NAT servers are available on Windows 95/NT, Linux, Solaris, and some
of the better ISDN routers (not Ascend)

Pro: + Very configurable
+ No special application software needed

Con: - Requires a subnet from your ISP (expensive)

Network Address Translation is the name for a box that would have a pool of
valid IP addresses on the Internet interface which it can use. Whenever the
Internal network wanted to go to the Internet, it associates an available
VALID IP address from the Internet interface to the original requesting
PRIVATE IP address. After that, all traffic is re-written from the NAT
public IP address to the NAT private address. Once the associated PUBLIC
NAT address becomes idle for some pre-determined amount of time, the
PUBLIC IP address is returned back into the public NAT pool.

The major problem with NAT is, once all of the free public IP addresses are
used, any additional private users requesting Internet service are out of
luck until a public NAT address becomes free.

For an excellent and very comprehensive description of the various forms of
NAT, please see:

* [http://www.suse.de/~mha/linux-ip-nat/diplom/nat.html] http://www.suse.de
/~mha/linux-ip-nat/diplom/nat.html/




Here is another good site to learn about NAT, although many of the URLs are
old but still valid:

* [http://www.linas.org/linux/load.html] http://www.linas.org/linux/
load.html/



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.7. ( GUI ) - Are there any GUI firewall creation/management tools?

Yes! They vary in the type of user interface, complexity, etc. but they are
quite good though most are only for the IPFWADM tool so far. Here is a short
list of available tools in alphabetical order. If you know of any others or
have any thoughts on which ones are good/bad/ugly, please email David.



* John Hardin's IPFWADM Dot file generator - a IPCHAINS version is in the
works

* Sonny Parlin's [http://www.innertek.com] fBuilder: From the author of
FWCONFIG, this new solution is fully WWW based and offers redundancy
options, etc for both IPCHAINS and NetFilter.

* William Stearns's [http://www.pobox.com/~wstearns/mason/] Mason - A
Build-a-ruleset on-the-fly type system



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.8. ( MASQ and Dynamic IPs ) - Does IP Masquerade work with dynamically
assigned IP addresses?

Yes, it works with either dynamic IP addressed assigned by your ISP via
either PPP or a DHCP server (common for Cablemodem and DSL users). As long as
you have a valid Internet IP address, it should work. Of course, static IPs
work too. If you plan on implementing a strong IPTABLES, IPCHAINS, or IPFWADM
ruleset and/or plan on using a Port forwarder, your ruleset will have to be
re-executed everytime your IP address changes.

So, re-running the rc-firewall-* ruleset really depends on which method you
get your IP addresses:

* PPP: The /etc/ppp/ip-up script is always run when a PPP connection comes
up. Because of this, we can make the rc.firewall-* go get the new PPP IP
address and update the firewall ruleset. If the /etc/ppp/ip-up file
doesn't exist or if does exists, simply edit that file and append a line
containing the name of your chosen firewall ruleset. For example, to run
the SIMPLE IPTABLES ruleset:

+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|/etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-iptables |
| |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

* DHCP: If you get your IP address via DHCP, common for Cablemodem and DSL
users, it's easy get the rc.firewall-* ruleset to run when you get a new
IP lease. How this happens depends on what DHCP client your distribution
uses:

+ dhclient : Most modern Linux distributions use dhclient from ISC. To
re-run your specific rc-firewall-* script when your system gets a new
IP address, add the following line to the /etc/dhclient-exit-hooks
file. Please note that this example is loging the SIMPLE IPTABLES
ruleset. Please use the correct rc.firewall-* name for your specific
setup:
+------------------------------------------------------------+
|/etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-iptables |
| |
+------------------------------------------------------------+

+ pump : Many older Redhat distributions use this DHCP client. To
re-run the rc-firewall-* script when your system gets a new IP
address, add the following line to the /etc/pump.conf file. Please
note that this example is loading the SIMPLE IPTABLES ruleset. Please
use the correct rc.firewall-* name for your specific setup:
+------------------------------------------------------------+
|script /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-iptables |
| |
+------------------------------------------------------------+

+ dhcpcd : Many older distros use this DHCP client. To re-run the
rc-firewall-* script when your system gets a new IP address depends
on which verion of dhcpcd you're using.

For newer dhcpcd client versions, append the following line to the /
etc/dhcpcd-[interface].exe file. Please note that you have to replace
the [interface] text with the name of your Interface connecting to
the Internet. For this example, we are going run the SIMPLE IPTABLES
ruleset against the eth0 interface by editing the /etc/dhcpc/
dhcpcd-eth0.exe file:
+------------------------------------------------------------+
|/etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-iptables |
| |
+------------------------------------------------------------+

For old dhcpcd client versions, you need to figure out what script
starts up dhcpcd (depends on the Linux distribution and it's
version). From there, you need to replace the specific dhcpcd line
with the folling line with the correct Internet-facing interface
name. For this example, dhcpcd will run the SIMPLE IPTABLES ruleset
against the eth0 interface:
+------------------------------------------------------------+
|dhcpcd -c /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall eth0 |
| |
+------------------------------------------------------------+



Please also see the top of [http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/
index-linux.html#TrinityOS] TrinityOS - Section 10 for additional help with
strong firewall rulesets and Dynamic IP addresses.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.9. ( MASQ and various networks ) - Can I use a cable modem (both
bi-directional and with modem returns), DSL, satellite link, etc. to connect
to the Internet and use IP Masquerade?

Yes, as long as Linux supports that network interface, it should work. If you
receive a dynamic IP address, please see the URL under the "Does IP
Masquerade work with dynamically assigned IP" FAQ item above.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.10. ( Dial on Demand ) - Can I use Diald or the Dial-on-Demand feature of
PPPd with IP MASQ?

Definitely! IP Masquerading is totally transparent to Diald or PPP. The only
thing that might become an issue is if you use STRONG firewall rulesets with
dynamic IP addresses. See the FAQ item, "Does IP Masquerade work with
dynamically assigned IP addresses?" above for more details.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.11. ( Apps ) - What applications are supported with IP Masquerade?

It is very difficult to keep track of a list of "working applications".
However, most of the normal Internet applications are supported, such as WWW
browsing (Netscape, MSIE, etc.), FTP (such as WS_FTP), TELNET, SSH,
RealAudio, POP3 (incoming email - Pine, Eudora, Outlook), SMTP (outgoing
email), etc. A somewhat more complete list of MASQ-compatible clients can be
found in Section 6.3 in this HOWTO.

Applications involving more complicated protocols or special connection
methods such as video conferencing software need special helper tools.

For more details, please see the [http://www.tsmservices.com/masq/] Linux IP
masquerading Applications page.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.12. ( Distro Setup ) - How can I get IP Masquerade running on Redhat,
Debian, Slackware, etc.?

No matter which Linux distribution you have, the procedures for setting up IP
Masquerade mentioned in this HOWTO should apply. Some distributions may have
GUI or special configuration files that make the setup easier. We tried our
best to write this HOWTO as general as possible.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.13. ( Timeouts ) - Connections seem to break if I don't use them often. Why
is that?

IP Masq, by default, sets its timers for TCP session, TCP FIN, and UDP
traffic to 15 minutes. It is recommend to use the following settings (as
already shown in this HOWTO's /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-* ruleset) for most
users:

Linux 2.4.x with IPTABLES

+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|IPMASQ timeouts are NOT adjustable under IPTABLES |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Linux 2.2.x with IPCHAINS:

+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|# MASQ timeouts |
|# |
|# 2 hrs timeout for TCP session timeouts |
|# 10 sec timeout for traffic after the TCP/IP "FIN" packet is received |
|# 60 sec timeout for UDP traffic (MASQ'ed ICQ users must enable a 30sec |
|# firewall timeout in ICQ itself) |
|# |
|/ipchains -M -S 7200 10 60 |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Linux 2.0.x with IPFWADM:

+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|# MASQ timeouts |
|# |
|# 2 hrs timeout for TCP session timeouts |
|# 10 sec timeout for traffic after the TCP/IP "FIN" packet is received |
|# 60 sec timeout for UDP traffic (MASQ'ed ICQ users must enable a 30sec |
|# firewall timeout in ICQ itself) |
|# |
|/sbin/ipfwadm -M -s 7200 10 60 |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.14. ( Odd Behavior ) - When my Internet connection first comes up, nothing
works. If I try again, everything then works fine. Why is this?

The reason is because you have a dynamic IP address and when your Internet
connection first comes up, IP Masquerade doesn't know its IP address. There
is a solution to this. In your /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-* ruleset, add the
following:

+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|# Dynamic IP users: |
|# |
|# If you get your IP address dynamically from SLIP, PPP, or DHCP, enable this |
|# following option. This enables dynamic-ip address hacking in IP MASQ, making |
|# the life with Diald and similar programs much easier. |
|# |
|echo "1" > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_dynaddr |
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.15. ( MTU ) - IP MASQ seems to be working fine but some sites don't work.
This usually happens with WWW and some FTP sites.

Depending on what Linux kernel version you are running on the MASQ server,
some will people disagree on the real problem. The two following arguments
have valid points, are inter-related, and users from each camp continue to
debate this to this day.

* With modern 2.4.x Linux systems, most users point their finger at the
adminstrators of these remote broken sites (typically SSL-encrypted WWW
sites, etc.) or your MASQ server's upstream router run by your ISP. The
main though it that these machines are either filtering or not properly
responding to SOME or ALL FORMS of ICMP packets (specifically ICMP Code 3
Type 4 - Fragmentation Needed) messages due to a fray of misplaced
security paranoia.

What does that all mean? Basically, say your machine is connected to the
Internet with a MTU of 1492 bytes (Maximum Transmission Unit -- the
maximum packet size your computer can transmit) which is common for PPPoE
users. At the same time, the remote WWW/FTP site is connected to the
Internet at a MTU of 1500 bytes. The way that TCP/IP works is that when a
TCP connection is being negotiated for your HTTP / FTP connection, the
remote side will try to verify that a 1500 byte packet can reach your
computer via the initial TCP "SYN" packet.

Since the packet is too big for your connection, your upstream router
(run by your ISP) will send a ICMP 3:4 (fragmentation needed) packet back
to the remote WWW / FTP server. Within this packet is a recommended
smaller MTU size to retry with. The problem is that either your local
upstream router, some router between you and the remote server, or the
remote HTTP / FTP server is either misconfigured or has a firewall in
front of it that is BLOCKing these ICMP packets.

* The final UNCOMMON possibility is a debatable 2.0 / 2.2 kernel bug in the
IPMASQ code. Some users point their finger to the fact that IPMASQ might
have problems with ICMP packets that have the DF or "Don't Fragment" bit
set. Basically, when a MASQ box connects to the Internet with an MTU of
anything less than 1500, some packets will have the DF field set. Though
changing the MTU of the MASQ server's Internet link to 1500 seemingly
fixes the problem, the possible bug is still there. What is believed to
be happening in these older kernels is that the MASQ code is not properly
re-writing the return IP addresses of the ICMP 3 Sub 4 code packets back
to the originating MASQed computer. Because of this, these critical
packets get dropped.


No worries though. A there are several perfectly good ways to fix this nasty
MTU problem:

* Enable PMTU clamping in PPPoE

This solution is mostly for modern 2.4.x and 2.2.x kernel users connected
to the Internet via a PPPoE DSL or Cablemodem connections. This solution
allows for changes to be done ONLY on the MASQ server itself and not on
all of the internal MASQ clients.

* Enable PMTU clamping via IPTABLES

This solution is only modern 2.4.x kernel users connected via ANY type of
Internet connection. This solution allows for changes to be done ONLY on
the MASQ server itself and not on all of the internal MASQ clients.

* Change your MASQ server's Internet Link MTU

This solution will work for any Linux kernel version but is is NOT a
solution if you have a PPPoE connection for DSL or Cablemodem users.

It should be noted that some users will balk at this solution because it
can hurt some latency specific programs like TELNET and Internet games
but the impact is only slight. On the other hand, most HTTP and FTP
traffic will SPEED UP!

* Change the MTU of all internal MASQed machines

This solution requires the most work as you have to make minor changes to
ALL of the internal IPMASQed machines. Basically, you would be changing
the MTU on all of the internal machines to match the MTU of your MASQ
server's Internet connection. Fortunately, this solution is usually
bulletproof where as some of the other solutions mentioned in this
section might rarely not work.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
7.15.1. Enabling PMTU Clamping for PPPoE and some PPP Users:

For those users who use PPPoE clients for (DSL / Cablemodem) or PPP (Dialup),
your Internet connection is NOT "eth0" (for example) but usually "ppp0". In
addition to this, your Internet link's MTU or Maximum Transmission Unit
(largest packet you can transmit over the Internet) isn't 1500 bytes but
1492. The 1492 byte MTU comes from the link size of Ethernet (1518 bytes) -
Ethernet MAC overhead (18) = 1500. Then you subtract the PPPoE header (8
bytes) == MTU of 1492. This overhead isn't a big deal but sometimes ISPs or
remote Internet sites do stupid things to break PPPoE or non-1500 byte MTU
connected machines.

You can find more info about this topic on the web. Specifically, here is
good presentaion on the topic: mss-talk presentation (PDF). Here is the
entire Write up and other good info

To enable clamping in both the RP or PPPd PPPoE clients, add the following
line to your /etc/ppp/pppoe.conf file:
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| # - If you have a computer acting as a gateway for a LAN, choose "1412". |
| # The setting of 1412 is safe for either setup, but uses slightly more |
| # CPU power. |
| # |
| CLAMPMSS=1412 |
| |
+----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.15.2. Clamping the MSS via IPTABLES:

As mentioned above for PPPoE users, some ISPs and WWW sites filter critical
ICMP packets like MTU Path Discovery. Because of this, many users might find
more Internet sites work but others hang or work poorly. Fortunately, recent
IPTABLES have added PMTU Clamping support which should help you. If your
using IPTABLES and think you're hitting this issue, try adding the following
line to the end of your rc.firewall-iptables ruleset. It should be noted that
there is no PMTU clamping support in IPCHAINS.
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| iptables -I FORWARD -p tcp --tcp-flags SYN,RST SYN -j TCPMSS --clamp-mss-to-pmtu |
| |
+------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+

If this line causes an error when you re-run the rc.firewall-iptables*
firewall rulesets, you might need to upgrade your version of IPTABLES which
includes the "TCPMSS" IPTABLES module.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.15.3. Changing the External MTU of the MASQ server:

This solution usually only applies to DIALUP users since PPPoE users cannot
INCREASE their MTU because of PPPoE's header overhead.

To use this solution, first see what your current MTU for your Internet link
is. To do so, run "/bin/ifconfig" on the MASQ server. Look at the lines that
corresponds to your Internet connection and look for the MTU (for example,
ppp0). This NEEDs to be set to 1500. Usually, Ethernet links will default to
1500 for Ethernet but serial / DIALUP modem PPP links might default to 576.

* To change the MTU on a standard Ethernet link to your bridged or routed
DSL, Cablemodem, etc. connection, you need to edit the correct network
startup scripts for your Linux distribution. Please see the [http://
www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/index-linux.html#TrinityOS] TrinityOS
- Section 16 document for network optimizations.

* To change the MTU issue on a PPP (not PPPoE) Internet link, edit your "/
etc/ppp/options" file and towards the top, add the following text on two
seperate lines, add:
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
| mtu 1500 |
| mru 1500 |
| |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+

Save these new changes and then restart PPP. Like shown above, verify
that your PPP link has the correct MTU and MTU.

CUA Users: Lastly, though this isn't a common problem, some Linux 2.0.x
kernel users have found a MTU solution to the following problem. With PPP
users, verify what port is your PPPd code connecting to. Is it a /dev/cua
* port or a /dev/ttyS* port? It NEEDS to be a /dev/ttyS* port as the /dev
/cua* device ststem has been deprecated and it breaks some things in very
odd ways.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
7.15.4. Changing the MTU of various operating systems:

If you reconfigure ALL of your MASQed PCs to use the SAME MTU as your
external Internet link's MTU (for example, 1492 for PPPoE users), everything
should work fine and this method is sometimes the MOST EFFECTIVE way of
fixing things. This is including ALL of the solutions mentioned above. But
doing things this way can be a lot of work if there are lots of internal
MASQed machines or be even impossible to do if you don't have administrative
access to all the internal MASQed machines.

Follow these simple steps for your respective operating system:

The follow examples utilize an MTU of 1492 for typical PPPoE connections for
some DSL and Cablemodem users. It is recommended to use the HIGHEST values
possible for all connections that are 128Kb/s and faster. It should be noted
that some PPPoE ISPs might require an MTU setting of 1460 (not 1492) for
proper connectivity due to additional overhead in the ISP's internal network.

The only real reason to use smaller MTUs than 1492 or 1460 is to lower your
Internet link's latency but at the cost of throughput. Please see [http://
www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/PPP/ppp-performance.html#mtu] http://
www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/PPP/ppp-performance.html#mtu for more details
on this topic.

If you know how to make similar changes like these to other OSes like OS/2,
MacOS, etc. please email [mailto:dranch@trinnet.net] David Ranch so it can be
included in the HOWTO.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.15.4.1. Changing the MTU on Linux:


------------------------------------------
1. The setting of MTU can vary from Linux distribution to distribution.

For Redhat: You need to edit the various "ifconfig" statements in
the /sbin/ifup script

For Slackware: You need to edit the various "ifconfig" statements in
the /etc/rc.d/rc1.inet

2. Here is one good, any-distribution-will-work example, edit the
/etc/rc.d/rc.local file and put the following at the END of the file:

echo "Changing the MTU of ETH0"
/sbin/ifconfig eth0 mtu 1492

Replace "eth0" with the interface name that is the machine's upstream
connection which is connected to the Internet.

3. For advanced options like "TCP Receive Windows" and such, detailed examples
on how to edit the respective networking scripts for your specific Linux
distro, etc., please see Chapter 16 of
http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/index-linux.html#trinityos
------------------------------------------

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.15.4.2. Changing the MTU on MS Windows 2000


------------------------------------------
1. Making ANY changes to the Registry is inheritantly risky but
with a backup copy, you should be safe. Proceed at your
OWN RISK.

2. Goto Start-->Run-->RegEdit

3. Registry-->Export Registry File-->Save a copy of your registry
to a reliable place

4. Navigate down to the key:

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters\Inter
faces\

Each ID Adapter has default keys for DNS, TCP/IP address, Default Gateway,
subnet mask, etc. Find the key one that is for your network card.

5. Create the following Entry:

type=DWORD
name="MTU" (Do NOT include the quotes)
value=1492 (Decimal) (Do NOT include the text "(Decimal)")

http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q120/6/42.asp?LN=EN-US&SD=gn&FR=0


*** If you know how to also change the MSS, TCP Window Size, and the
*** TTL parameters in NT 2000, please email dranch@trinnet.net as I
*** would love to add it to the HOWTO.

5. Reboot to let the changes take effect.
------------------------------------------

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.15.4.3. Changing the MTU on MS Windows NT 4.x

------------------------------------------
1. Making ANY changes to the Registry is inheritantly risky but
with a backup copy, you should be safe. Proceed at your
OWN RISK.

2. Goto Start-->Run-->RegEdit

3. Registry-->Export Registry File-->Save a copy of your registry
to a reliable place

4. Create the following keys in the Registry trees, choose two
possible Registry trees. Multiple entries are for various
network devices like DialUp Networking (ppp), Ethernet NICs,
PPTP VPNs, etc.

http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q102/9/73.asp?LN=EN-US&SD=gn&FR=0


[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Parameters\Tcpip]
and
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\\Parameters\Tcpip]

Replace "" with the respective name of your uplink LAN NIC
interface

type=DWORD
name="MTU" (Do NOT include the quotes)
value=1492 (Decimal) (Do NOT include the text "(Decimal>")

(Do NOT include the quotes)


*** If you know how to also change the MSS, TCP Window Size, and the
*** TTL parameters in NT 4.x, please email dranch@trinnet.net as I
*** would love to add it to the HOWTO.

5. Reboot to make the changes take effect.
------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.15.4.4. Changing the MTU on MS Windows 98:


------------------------------------------
1. Making ANY changes to the Registry is inheritantly risky but
with a backup copy, you should be safe. Proceed at your OWN RISK.

2. Goto Start-->Run-->RegEdit

3. You should make a backup copy of your Registry before doing anything. To
do this, copy the "user.dat" and "system.dat" files from the \WINDOWS
directory and put them into a safe place. It should be noted that the
previously mentioned method of using "Regedit: Registry-->Export Registry
File-->Save a copy of your registry" would only perform Registry MERGES
and NOT do a replacement.

4. Search though each of the Registry trees that end in "n" (e.g. 0007)
and have a Registry entry called "IPAddress" which has the IP address
of your NIC. Under that key, add the following:

From http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q158/4/74.asp

[Hkey_Local_Machine\System\CurrentControlset\Services\Class\NetTrans\000n]
type=STRING
name="MaxMTU" (Do NOT include the quotes)
value=1492 (Decimal) (Do NOT include the text "(Decimal)")


5. You can also change the "TCP Receive Window" which sometimes
increases network performance SUBSTANTIALLY. If you notice your
throughput has DECREASED, put these items BACK to their original
settings and reboot.

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\VxD\MSTCP]

type=STRING
name="DefaultRcvWindow" (Do NOT include the quotes)
value=32768 (Decimal) (Do NOT include the text "(Decimal>")

type=STRING
name="DefaultTTL" (Do NOT include the quotes)
value=128 (Decimal) (Do NOT include the text "(Decimal>")


6. Reboot to let the changes take effect.
------------------------------------------

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.15.4.5. Changing the MTU on MS Windows 95:


------------------------------------------
1. Making ANY changes to the Registry is inheritantly risky but
with a backup copy, you should be safe. Proceed at your OWN RISK.

2. Goto Start-->Run-->RegEdit

3. You should make a backup copy of your Registry before continuing. To
do this, copy the "user.dat" and "system.dat" files from the \WINDOWS
directory and put them into a safe place. It should be noted that the
previously mentioned method of using "Regedit: Registry-->Export Registry
File-->Save a copy of your registry" would only do Registry MERGES and NOT
do a replacement.

4. Search through each of the Registry trees that end in "n" (e.g. 0007)
and have a Registry entry called "IPAddress", which has the IP address
of your NIC. Under that key, add the following:

From http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q158/4/74.asp

[Hkey_Local_Machine\System\CurrentControlset\Services\Class\NetTrans\000n]

type=DWORD
name="MaxMTU" (Do NOT include the quotes)
value=1492 (Decimal) (Do NOT include the text "(Decimal)")

type=DWORD
name="MaxMSS" (Do NOT include the quotes)
value=1450 (Decimal) (Do NOT include the text "(Decimal>")


5. You can also change the "TCP Receive Window" which sometimes
increases network performance SUBSTANTIALLY. If you notice your
throughput has DECREASED, put these items BACK to their original
settings and reboot.

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\VxD\MSTCP]
type=DWORD
name="DefaultRcvWindow" (Do NOT include the quotes)
value=32768 (Decimal) (Do NOT include the text "(Decimal>")

type=DWORD
name="DefaultTTL" (Do NOT include the quotes)
value=128 (Decimal) (Do NOT include the text "(Decimal>")


6. Reboot to let the changes take effect.
------------------------------------------

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.16. ( FTP ) - MASQed FTP clients don't work.

Check to see that the "ip_masq_ftp" module is loaded. To do this, log into
the MASQ server and run the command "/sbin/lsmod". If you don't see the
"ip_masq_ftp" module loaded, make sure that you followed the BASIC /etc/rc.d/
rc.firewall-* recommendations found in Section 3.4. If you are implementing
your own ruleset, make sure you include most of the examples from the HOWTO
or you will have many susequent problems.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.17. ( Performance ) - IP Masquerading seems slow

There might be a few reasons for this:

* You might be unrealistic about how much available bandwidth is on your
modem line. Lets do the math for a typical 56k modem connection:

1. 56k modems = 56,000 bits per second.

2. You really DON'T have a 56k modem but a 52k modem per US FCC
limitations.

3. You'll almost NEVER get 52k, the best connection I used to get was
48k

4. 48,000 bits per second is 4,800 BYTES per second (8 bits to a byte +
2 bits for the START and STOP RS-232 serial bits)

5. With an MTU of 1500, you will get (3.2) packets in one second. Since
this will involve fragmentation, you need to round DOWN to (3)
packets per second.

6. Again with MTU of 1500, thats 3.2 x 40 bytes of TCP/IP overhead (8%)

7. So the BEST throughput you could hope for is 4.68KB/s w/o
compression. Compression, be it v.42bis hardware compression, MNP5,
or MS/Stac compression can yeild impressive numbers on highly
compressable stuff like TEXT files, but acutally slow things down
when transfering pre-compressed files like ZIPs, MP3s, etc.



Ethernet attached setups (DSL, Cablemodem, LANs, etc)

* Make sure you don't have both your INTERNAL and EXTERNAL networks running
on the same network card with the "IP Alias" feature. If you ARE doing
this, it can be made to work but it will be excessively slow due to high
levels of collisions, IRQ usage, etc. It is highly recommended that you
install another network card for the internal and external networks to
have their own interface.

* Make sure you have the right Ethernet settings for both SPEED and DUPLEX.

* Some 10Mb/s Ethernet cards and most 100Mb/s cards support FULL Duplex
connections. Direct connections from an Ethernet card to, say, a DSL
modem (without any hubs in between) *CAN* be set to FULL DUPLEX but only
if the DSL modem supports it. You should also be sure that you have
Ethernet cables with all eight wires used and that they are in good
condition.

Internal networks that use HUBs -cannot- use Full Duplex. You need either
a 10 or 100Mb.s Ethernet SWITCH to be able to do this.

Both auto 10/100Mb/s SPEED negotiation and Full/Half DUPLEX negotiation
on Ethernet cards can wreck havoc on networks. I recommend to hard code
both the NIC speed and duplex into the NIC(s) if possible. This is
directly possible via Linux NIC kernel modules but isn't directly
possible in monolithic kernels. You will need to either use MII utililies
from Section 8.1 or hardcode the kernel source.


Optimize your MTU and set the TCP Sliding window to at least 8192

* Though this is COMPLETELY out of the scope of this document, this helps
QUITE A BIT with ANY network link you have, be it an internal or external
PPP, Ethernet, TokenRing, etc. link. For more details, this topic is
briefly touched in an above section in Section 7.15. For even more
details, check out the Network Optimization section of [http://
www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/index-linux.html#TrinityOS] TrinityOS
- Section 16.


Serial based modem users with PPP

* If you have an external modem, make sure you have a good serial cable.
Also, many PCs have cheesy ribbon cables connecting the serial port from
the motherboard or I/O card to the serial port connection. If you have
one of these, make sure it is in good condition. Personally, I have
ferrite coils (those grey-black metal like rings) around ALL of my ribbon
cables.

* Make sure your MTU is set to 1500 as described in the FAQ section of this
HOWTO above

* Make sure that your serial port is a 16550A or better UART. Run "dmesg |
more" to verify

* Setup IRQ-Tune for your serial ports.

On most PC hardware, the use of Craig Estey's [http://cae.best.vwh.net/
irqtune/] IRQTUNE tool and significantly increase serial port performance
including SLIP and PPP connections.

* Make sure that your serial port for your PPP connection is running at
115200 (or faster if both your modem and serial port can handle it..
a.k.a ISDN terminal adapters)

+ 2.0.x kernels: The 2.0.x kernels are kind of an odd ball because you
can't directly tell the kernel to clock the serial ports at 115200.
So, in one of your startup scripts like the /etc/rc.d/rc.local or /
etc/rc.d/rc.serial file, execute the following commands for a modem
on COM2:

+ setserial /dev/ttyS1 spd_vhi

+ In your PPPd script, edit the actual pppd execution line to include
the speed "38400" per the pppd man page.

+ 2.2.x kernels: Unlike the 2.0.x kernels, both the 2.1.x and 2.2.x
kernels don't have this "spd_vhi" issue.

So, in your PPPd script, edit the actual pppd execution line to
include the speed "115200" per the pppd man page.



All interface types:
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.18. ( PORTFW ) - IP Masquerading with PORTFWing seems to break when my line
is idle for long periods

If you have a DSL or Cablemodem, this behavior is unfortunately quite common.
Basically your ISP is putting your connection into a very low priority queue
to better service non-idle connections. The problem is that some enduser's
connections will actually be taken OFFLINE until some traffic from the user's
DSL/Cablemodem connection awakens the ISP's hardware.

* Some DSL installations can take an idle connection OFFLINE and only be
checked for activity once every 30 seconds or so.

* Some Cablemodem setups can set an idle connection into a low priority
queue and only be checked for activity every minute or so.


What do I recommend to do? Ping your default gateway every 30 seconds. To do
this, edit the /etc/rc.d/rc.local file and add the following to the bottom of
the file:

ping -i 30 100.200.212.121 > /dev/null &

Replace the 100.200.212.121 with your default router (upstream router).
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.19. ( PORTFW - Locally ) - I can't reach my PORTFWed server from the
INTERNAL lan

Basically, say your domain, acme.com, has an external IP address of 1.2.3.4
and you are PORTFWing all WWW traffic to an internal machine, say,
192.168.0.20/24. Then an /internal/ user on the 192.169.0.x network tries to
contact to http://www.acme.com and expects things to work. Well, that isn't
going to happen with a basic config. Let me explain. Basically, http://
www.acme.com is being resolved to the IP of http://1.2.3.4 by your chosen DNS
server. What really should be happening is the web request should resolve
that request to http://192.168.0.20.

See the difference?

The proper solution to this is to setup a SPLIT DNS server. Internal users
would be configured to use an /internal/ DNS server which would resolve
requests like this with the 192.168.0.20 address when asked for www.acme.com.
All external users should be serviced by an /external/ DNS server which will
will resolve the requrest to the 1.2.3.4 IP address. From there, IPTABLES/
IPCHAINS/IPFWADM would then PORTFW the traffic to the 192.168.0.20 server as
normal.

But you're probably thinking that you don't want to setup a split DNS server
and there has to be another way. There are a few alternatives! The first
alternative is if you only have a few internal machines. Here, you can setup
a "hosts" file entry on *all* internal machines. That static hosts entry
would basically look like:

+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|www.acme.com 192.168.0.20 |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Got it? With that in place, the machine would consult the hosts table before
going to the DNS server to resolve the host. This works well but if you
change the IP address on that internal web server, you're going to need to
manually update the hosts file on all of those internal machines. If you are
interested in doing the more scalable split DNS approach, TrinityOS
completely covers split and chrooted DNS servers. [http://
www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/index-linux.html#TrinityOS] TrinityOS -
Section 24 http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/index-linux.html#
trinityos

Now, if neither the split DNS nor the hosts file approach interests you, you
still have a simple but effective alternative to get things working. What you
can do is add some specific rules to your rc.firewall-* ruleset. Please see
the "PORTFW Redirection of Internal requests" section under the Section 6.7
chapter.

Why didn't I mention this alternative solution first? The main reason is that
it's not the ideal solution. The primary problem with this approach is that
every packet will be going from the internal MASQed client to the MASQ
server. There, the MASQ server will SNAT each packet to the internal MASQed
WWW server's IP and then forward it to the internal web server. Once the
packet is received and responded to by the web server, that response has to
go back through all that processing back to the original client machine. This
process is overly wasteful on both network bandwidth and MASQ server CPU
cycles!
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.20. ( Logs ) - Now that I have IP Masquerading up, I'm getting all sorts of
weird notices and errors in the SYSLOG log files. How do I read the IPTABLES/
IPCHAINS/IPFWADM firewall errors?

There is probably a few common things that you are going to see:

* MASQ: Failed TCP Checksum error: You might see this error when a packet
coming from the Internet gets corrupt in the data section of the packet
but the rest of it "seems" ok. When the Linux box receives this packet,
it will calculate the CRC of the packet and determine that its corrupt.
On most machines running OSes like Microsoft Windows, they just silently
drop the packets but Linux IP MASQ reports it. If you get a LOT of them
over your PPP link, first follow the FAQ entry above for "(Performance) -
Masq seems is slow".

If the (Performance) FAQ tips don't help and you run PPP over dialup or
PPPoE, you might try adding the line "-vj" (disabled VanJacobson header
compression) to your /etc/ppp/options file and restart the PPPd
connection.

* Firewall hits: Because you are on the Internet with a decent firewall,
you will be surprised with the number of users trying to penetrate your
Linux box! So what do all these firewall logs mean?

More so, if they are filling your logs, see the next FAQ entry on
thoughts how to reduce all these log entries.

* The following details are from the [http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/
LINUX/index-linux.html#TrinityOS] TrinityOS - Section 10 documentation I
also wrote:

With the use of various firewall rulesets, a given ruleset can either
DENY (silently drop) or REJECT traffic (sends back a ICMP error). If
firewall logging is enabled, the errors will show up in the SYSLOG
"messages" file found at:

Redhat: /var/log
Slackware: /var/adm

If you take a look at one of these firewall logs, you would see something
like:

---------------------------------------------------------------------
IPTABLES:
---------
Feb 23 07:37:01 Roadrunner kernel: IPTABLES IN=eth0 OUT=
MAC=00:50:da:2e:e5:fb:00:03:47:73:c9:d2:08:00 SRC=12.75.147.174
DST=100.200.0.212 LEN=44 TOS=0x00 PREC=0x00 TTL=64 ID=39034 DF PROTO=TCP
SPT=4313 DPT=23 WINDOW=32120 RES=0x00 SYN URGP=0


IPCHAINS:
---------
Feb 23 07:37:01 Roadrunner kernel: input REJECT eth0 PROTO=6
12.75.147.174:1633 100.200.0.212:23 L=44 S=0x00 I=54054 F=0x0040 T=64


IPFWADM:
--------
Feb 23 07:37:01 Roadrunner kernel: IP fw-in rej eth0 TCP 12.75.147.174:1633
100.200.0.212:23 L=44 S=0x00 I=54054 F=0x0040 T=64

---------------------------------------------------------------------

There is a LOT of information in just this one line of SYSLOG. Lets break
out this example. You should refer back to the original firewall hit as you
read this.

--------------

1. ===================================================================

- This packet firewall "hit" occurred on "Feb 23 07:37:01"

2. ===================================================================

- This packet was logged on the "RoadRunner" computer via the kernel

3. ===================================================================

- IPTABLES: the SYSLOG prepend string is "iptables" for information purposes

- IPCHAINS: the packet was stopped on the INPUT chain

- IPFWADM: the packet was an IP packet

4. ===================================================================

- IPTABLES: the packet came IN on interface "eth0"

- IPCHAINS: the packet was REJECTED (vs. dropped or accepted)

- IPFWADM: the packet was stopped on INPUT (vs. "fw-out" for OUT or
"fw-fwd" for FORWARD)

5. ===================================================================

- IPTABLES: the packet had NO output interface

- IPCHAINS: the packet came in on the "eth0" interface

- IPFWADM: the packet was REJECTED "rej" (vs. "deny" or "accept")

6. ===================================================================

- IPTABLES: this display's the MAC address of the source and destination
Ethetnet MAC address (only relivant for Ethernet networks)

- IPCHAINS: the packet was IP protocol 6 or TCP
* If you don't know that protocol 6 is for TCP, look at
your /etc/protocols file to see what other protocol numbers
are used for.

- IPFWADM: the packet on the "eth0" interface

7. ===================================================================

- IPTABLES: the packet's source IP address was 12.75.147.174

- IPCHAINS: the packet's source IP address was 12.75.147.174

- IPFWADM: the packet was a "TCP" packet

8. ===================================================================

- IPTABLES: the packet's destination IP address was 100.200.0.212

- IPCHAINS: the packet's source PORT was 1633

- IPFWADM: the packet's source IP address was 12.75.147.174

9. ===================================================================

- IPTABLES: the packet's length was 44 bytes

- IPCHAINS: the packet's destination IP address was 100.200.0.212

- IPFWADM: the packet's source PORT was 1633

10. ===================================================================

- IPTABLES: the packet's TOS markings (type of service which basically
means class of service) was 0x00 or zero.

- IPCHAINS: the packet's destination PORT was 23 (telnet)
* If you don't know that port 23 is for TELNETing, look at
your /etc/services file to see what other ports are used
for.

- IPFWADM: the packet's destination IP address was 100.200.0.212

11. ===================================================================

- IPTABLES: the packet's precedense markings (class of service) was
0x00 or zero.

- IPCHAINS: the packet's length was 44 bytes

- IPFWADM: the packet's destination PORT was 23 (telnet)
* If you don't know that port 23 is for TELNETing, look at
your /etc/services file to see what other ports are used
for.

12. ==================================================================

- IPTABLES: the packet's TTL or Time to Live was 64 or 64 router hops
* Every router hop over the Internet will subtract (1) from
this number. Usually, packets will start with a number of
255 (depends on the operating system) and if that number
ever reaches (0), it means that realistically, the packet
was lost in a network loop and should be deleted.

- IPCHAINS: the packet's TOS markings (type of service which basically
means class of service) was 0x00 or zero.
* divide this by 4 to get the Type of Service (presidence)

- IPFWADM: the packet was 44 bytes long

13. ==================================================================

- IPTABLES: the packet had various TCP flags set such as SYN, SYN+ACK,
etc. (shown in HEX)

- IPCHAINS: the packet had various TCP flags set (shown in hex)

- IPFWADM: the packet's TOS markings (type of service which basically
means class of service) was 0x00 or zero.

14. ==================================================================

- IPTABLES: the packet's "don't fragment" or DF bit was set from the
source computer

- IPCHAINS: the packet had a fragmentation offset of 40 (shown in HEX)

--Don't worry if you don't understand this..
* A value that started with "0x2..." or "0x3..." means the
"More Fragments" bit was set so more fragmented packets
will be coming in to complete this one BIG packet.
* A value which started with "0x4..." or "0x5..." means that
the "Don't Fragment" bit was set
* Any other values are the Fragment offset (divided by 8) to
be later used to recombine into the original LARGE packet

- IPFWADM: the packet had various TCP flags set such as SYN, SYN+ACK,
etc. (shown in HEX)

15. ==================================================================

- IPTABLES: the packet was a TCP packet

- IPCHAINS: the packet's TTL or Time to Live was 64 or 64 router hops
* Every router hop over the Internet will subtract (1) from
this number. Usually, packets will start with a number of
255 (depends on the operating system) and if that number
ever reaches (0), it means that realistically, the packet
was lost in a network loop and should be deleted.

- IPFWADM: the packet had a fragmentation offset of 40 (shown in HEX)

--Don't worry if you don't understand this..
* A value that started with "0x2..." or "0x3..." means the
"More Fragments" bit was set so more fragmented packets
will be coming in to complete this one BIG packet.
* A value which started with "0x4..." or "0x5..." means that
the "Don't Fragment" bit was set
* Any other values are the Fragment offset (divided by 8) to
be later used to recombine into the original LARGE packet

16. ==================================================================

- IPTABLES: the packet's soure PORT was 4313

- IPCHAINS:

- IPFWADM: the packet's TTL or Time to Live was 64 or 64 router hops
* Every router hop over the Internet will subtract (1) from
this number. Usually, packets will start with a number of
255 (depends on the operating system) and if that number
ever reaches (0), it means that realistically, the packet
was lost in a network loop and should be deleted.

17. ==================================================================

- IPTABLES: the packet's destination PORT was 23 (telnet)
* If you don't know that port 23 is for TELNETing, look at
your /etc/services file to see what other ports are used
for.

- IPCHAINS:

- IPFWADM:

18. ==================================================================

- IPTABLES: the packet's TCP window (sliding or selective TCP ack)
was 32120 bytes

- IPCHAINS:

- IPFWADM:

19. ==================================================================

- IPTABLES: the packet's TCP reserved bits were 0x00 (HEX) - unused

- IPCHAINS:

- IPFWADM:

20. ==================================================================

- IPTABLES: the packet's TCP header SYN bit was set
* IPTABLES displays all the TCP header bits by name and not
by a HEX dump

- IPCHAINS:

- IPFWADM:

21. ==================================================================

- IPTABLES: the packet's TCP header URGENT bit was set - rarely used

- IPCHAINS:

- IPFWADM:


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
7.21. ( Log Reduction ) - My logs are filling up with packet hits due to the
new "stronger" rulesets. How can I fix this?

So your realizing that a good firewall is catching a LOT of bad Internet
traffic. That's a good thing but it's also filling up your logs to the point
that you won't read them; that's bad. What to do?

What you need to figure out is what traffic you DON"T want to log, explicitly
match those packets in the firewall, and NOT log the packets when you drop
them.

For example, the TrinityOS firewall ruleset in section 10.7 (this would be a
"strongest" ruleset in IPMASQ speak) gives some ideas: [http://
www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/TrinityOS/cHTML/TrinityOS-c-10.html]
TrinityOS - Section 10.7

Things I recommend to filter:

* All RFC1918 address space (TCP/IP address ranges: 10.x.y.z/8,
172.16-31.y.z/12, and 192.168.y.x/16). You should /never/ receive these
packets from an Internet connection. If you do, they are most likely
spoofed packets

* Windows File and Print Sharing (Samba or CIFS): ports 137, 138, 139, and
445. Windows machines like to talk a lot though most computers don't care
what they're saying.

* Class-D Multicast addresses (if you don't use Multicast): 224.0.0.0/4

* Class-E and F "future" addresses: 240.0.0.0/5 and 248.0.0.0/5


To a much lesser extent, you might want to filter other packets. I recommend
that you verify that you are receiving these specific packet types before you
filter them out.

* RIP (the routing protocol): port 520

* Some specific forms of ICMP packets - NOT all of them (that will break
your machine and IPMASQ in general)


Finally, you'll probably find that some individual TCP/IP address out on the
Internet always seem to attack your IP. So, in addition to filtering various
PORTS like above, you might want to also filter by specific SOURCE IP address
too. After all, it is *YOUR* firewall.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.22. ( MASQ Security ) - Can I configure IP MASQ to allow Internet users to
directly contact internal MASQed servers?

Yes! With IPPORTFW, you can allow ALL or only a select few Internet hosts to
contact ANY of your internal MASQed computers. This topic is completely
covered in Section 6.7 in this HOWTO.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.23. ( Free Ports ) - I'm getting "kernel: ip_masq_new(proto=UDP): no free
ports." in my SYSLOG files. Whats up?

One of your internal MASQed machines are creating an abnormally high number
of packets destined for the Internet. As the IP Masq server builds the MASQ
table and forwards these packets out over the Internet, the table is quickly
filling. Once the table is filled, it will give you this error.

The only application that I have known which temporarily creates this
situation is a gaming program called "GameSpy". Why? Gamespy builds a server
list and then pings all of the servers in the list (1000s of game servers).
By creating all these pings, it creates 1,000s of quick connections in a VERY
short period of time. Until these sessions timeout via the IP MASQ timeouts,
the MASQ tables become "FULL".

So what can you do about it? Realistically, don't use programs that do things
like this. If you do get this error in your logs, find it and stop using it.
If you really like GameSpy, just don't refresh the server too often.
Regardless, once you stop running this MASQ'ed program, this MASQ error will
go away as these connections will eventually timeout in the MASQ tables.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.24. ( SETSOCKOPT ) - I'm getting "ipfwadm: setsockopt failed: Protocol not
available" when I try to use IPPORTFW!

If you get the error message "ipfwadm: setsockopt failed: Protocol not
available", you AREN'T running your new kernel. Make sure that you moved the
new kernel over, re-run LILO, and then reboot again.

Please see the end of Section 6.7 for full details.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.25. ( SAMBA ) - Microsoft File and Print Sharing and Microsoft Domain
clients don't work through IP Masq!

To properly support Microsoft's SMB protocol, an IP Masq module would need to
be written but there are three viable work-arounds. For more details, please
see [http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;172227] this
Microsoft KnowledgeBase article.

The first way to work around this problem is to configure IPPORTFW from
Section 6.7 and portfw TCP ports 137, 138, and 139 to the internal Windows
machine's IP address. Though this solution works, it would only work for ONE
internal machine.

The second solution is to install and configure [http://www.samba.org] Samba
on the Linux MASQ server. With Samba running, you can then map your internal
Windows File and Print shares onto the Samba server. Then, you can mount
these newly mounted SMB shares to all of your external clients. Configuring
Samba is fully covered in a HOWTO found in a Linux Documentation Project and
in the TrinityOS document as well.

The third solution is to configure a VPN (virtual private network) between
the two Windows machines or between the two networks. This can either be done
via the PPTP or IPSEC VPN solutions. There is a Section 7.35 patch for Linux
and also a full IPSEC implementation available for both 2.0.x and 2.2.x
kernels. This solution would probably be the most reliable and secure method
of all three solutions.

All of these solutions are NOT covered by this HOWTO. I recommend that you
look at the TrinityOS documentation for IPSEC help and John Hardin's PPTP
page for more information.

Also PLEASE understand that Microsoft's SMB protocol is VERY insecure.
Because of this, running either Microsoft File and Print sharing or Windows
Domain login traffic over the Internet without any encryption is a VERY BAD
idea.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.26. ( IDENT ) - IRC won't work properly for MASQed IRC users. Why?

The main possible reason is because most common Linux distribution's IDENT or
"Identity" servers can't deal with IP Masqueraded links. No worries though,
there are IDENTs out there that will work.

Installing this software is beyond the scope of this HOWTO but each tool has
its own documentation. Here are some of the URLs:

* [http://freshmeat.net/projects/oidentd/?topic_id=150] Oident is a
favorite IDENT server for MASQ users.

* [http://freshmeat.net/projects/midentd/?topic_id=24] Mident is another
popular IDENT server.

* [http://http://home.indyramp.net/lists/masq/insecurity.net/sidentd.gz]
Sident

* [ftp://sunsite.unc.edu/pub/Linux/system/network/daemons/] Other Idents




Please note that some Internet IRC servers still won't allow multiple
connections from the same host even if they get Ident info and the users are
different though. Complain to the remote sys admin. :-)
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.27. ( IRC DCC ) - mIRC doesn't work with DCC Sends

This is a configuration problem on your copy of mIRC. To fix this, first
disconnect mIRC from the IRC server. Now in mIRC, go to File --> Setup and
click on the "IRC servers tab". Make sure that it is set to port 6667. If you
require other ports, see below. Next, goto File --> Setup --> Local Info and
clear the fields for Local Host and IP Addresses. Now select the checkboxes
for "LOCAL HOST" and "IP address" (IP address may be checked but disabled).
Next under "Lookup Method", configure it for "normal". It will NOT work if
"server" is selected. That's it. Try to the IRC server again.

If you require IRC server ports other than 6667, (for example, 6969) you need
to edit the /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-* startup file where you load the IRC MASQ
modules. Edit this file and the line for "modprobe ip_masq_irc" and add to
this line "ports=6667,6969". You can add additional ports as long as they are
separated with commas.

Finally, close down any IRC clients on any MASQed machines and re-load the
IRC MASQ module:

/sbin/rmmod ip_masq_irc /etc/rc.d/rc.firewall-*
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.28. ( IP Aliasing ) - Can IP Masquerade work with only ONE Ethernet network
card?

Yes and no. With the "IP Alias" kernel feature, users can setup multiple
aliased interfaces such as eth0:1, eth0:2, etc but its is NOT recommended to
use aliased interfaces for IP Masquerading. Why? Providing a secure firewall
becomes very difficult with a single NIC card. In addition to this, you will
experience an abnormal amount of errors on this link since incoming packets
will almost simultaneously be sent out at the same time. Because of all this
and NIC cards now costs less than $10, I highly recommend to just get a NIC
card for each MASQed network segment.

Users should also understand that IP Masquerading will only work with a
physical interface such as eth0, eth1, etc. MASQing out an aliased interface
such as "eth0:1, eth1:1, etc" will NOT work. In other words, the following
WILL NOT WORK reliably:

* It is rumored that you can simply use the destination IP address (the IP
address associated with the ALIASed interface like eth0:1, etc.) IN PLACE
of specifing the interface (eth0:1). This solution is not untested --
please email dranch@trinnet.net if you have any positive or negative
results

* /sbin/ipchains -A forward -i eth0:1 -s 192.168.0.0/24 -j MASQ"

* /sbin/ipfwadm -F -a m -W eth0:1 -S 192.168.0.0/24 -D 0.0.0.0/0




If you are still interested in using aliased interfaces, you need to enable
the "IP Alias" feature in the kernel. You will then need to re-compile and
reboot. Once running the new kernel, you need to configure Linux to use the
new interface (i.e. eth0:1, etc.). After that, you can treat it as a normal
Ethernet interface with some restrictions like the one above.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.29. ( Multiple-LANs ) - I have two MASQed LANs but they cannot communicate
with each other!

Please see Section 6.5 for full details.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.30. ( SHAPING ) - I want to be able to limit the speed of specific types of
traffic

I receive lots of emails from people asking something like the following:

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|How can I control the internet bandwidth among the LAN PCs behind the IPMASQ |
|server? Some times any local pc is downloading and it it will take the majority |
|of the bandwidth and thus the other PCs get little bandwidth. |
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+

This topic really doesn't have anything to do with IPMASQ and everthing to do
with Linux's built-in traffic shaping and rate-limiting abilities. You will
find information about this on the LDP such as the [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO
/ADSL-Bandwidth-Management-HOWTO/index.html] ADSL Bandwidth HOWTO, the
Advanced Rouring HOWTO, and the Bandwidth Limiting HOWTO. Please understand
this is an advanced topic and any question you may have will be better served
from people from those forums.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.31. ( ACCOUNTING ) - I need to do accounting on who is using the network

Though this doesn't have much to do with IPMASQ, here are a few ideas. If you
know of a better solution, please email the author of this HOWTO so it can be
added to the HOWTO.



* Idea #1: You could run the command:
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
|IPCHAINS: "ipchains -L -M" |
| |
|IPTABLES: "cat /proc/net/ip_conntrack" |
| |
|IPFWADM: |
+---------------------------------------------------------------+
once a second and log all of those entries. You could then write a
program to merge this information into one large file. Again, this will
only provide you with the remote IP address and nothing about the content
viewed or downloaded.

* Idea #2: Log every packet: You can match any specific traffic flows but
this method will create VERY LARGE log files. Unfortunately, these log
files aren't very readable and it doesn't tell you what was transfered
(FTP files, etc.). Fortunately, setting up this form of accounting is
easy.

* Idea #3: Say you want to log all traffic going out onto the internet. You
can setup a firewall rule to accept port 80 traffic with with the SYN bit
set and log it. Now mind you, this will create smaller log files than the
idea above but you will only know the destination IP address and NOT the
WWW pages viewed.

* Idea #4: Transparent Proxy: This method really doesn't use IPMASQ since
it requires the installation and setup of the Squid HTTP/FTP proxy
server. The benefit of this method is that internal users won't notice
anything different in terms of connectivity but now the SysAdmin gets a
LOT more information (files downloaded, etc). But, there are pros/cons to
setting this up:

Pro:

+ + full logging of all transferred files and issues FTP commands

+ + you can enable caching on the proxy server. With caching, you can
save bandwidth since once a file is downloaded, any identical file
requests will be served via the cache and not redownloaded via the
Internet connection.


Con:

+ - Setting up a transparent proxy is complicated as it requires kernel
changes, setting up Squid, etc.

+ - Could be overkill for a small installation.


Please see the [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Adv-Routing-HOWTO/index.html]
Advanced Routing HOWTO for more details.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.32. ( MULTIPLE IPs - DMZ segments) - I have several EXTERNAL IP addresses
that I want to PORTFW to several internal machines. How do I do this?

Though technically possible, DON'T do this with IP MASQ. There are far better
solutions for this network design.

MASQ is a 1:Many NAT setup which is the incorrect tool to perform what you
are looking for. You are looking for is either Many:Many NAT solution or a
Briding setup.

NOTE: For users out there who are thinking about enabling multiple IP
addresses on one internal NIC using "IP Alias" and then just PORTFWeding ALL
of those ports (0-65535), and and finally use IPROUTE2 to maintain the proper
source/destination IP pairs. This has been done SUCCESSFULLY on 2.0.x kernels
and less successfully on 2.2.x kernels. Regardless of success, that isn't the
proper way to do it, it's a total HACK, and it is not a supported MASQ
configuration. Please, give IPTABLES on the 2.4.x kernels a serious look or
to a much lesser extent, Section 7.30 IPROUTE2 look for 2.2.x kernels.

Anyway, for forwarding external IP address to internal hosts, you basically
have three possibilites:

* +-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|1. Route the external IPs |
| |
| (This does NOT involve IPMASQ at all but requires special WAN addressing |
| and routing setup from your ISP): |
| |
| Internet -- Some public WAN -- Linux -- DMZ segment |
| IP address Server PUBLIC IPs |
| | |
| +------ Internal net |
| private IPs |
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+

* +---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|2. 1:1 NAT |
| |
| (Most easily done via IPTABLES or with IPCHAINS and IPROUTE2 but still |
| some protocols cannot deal with NAT) |
| |
| Internet -- Linux -- DMZ segment |
| Server Private IPs natted to 1:1 PUBLIC IPs |
| | |
| +------ Internal net |
| private IPs |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

* +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|3. Bridging or ProxyARP: |
| |
| The Bridging method is one of the more popular methods that many commercial |
| firewalls do and it's very slick. Alternatively, you can use the ProxyARP |
| method which works well without some of the complications (or benefits of |
| bridging). With both solutions, all public IPs can transparently flow |
| through the Linux server to the DMZ but via firewall inspection. |
| |
| Internet -- Linux -- DMZ segment |
| Server PUBLIC IPs |
| | |
| +------ Internal net |
| private IPs |
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+


Each of these solutions have pros and cons

Item #1: If you're lucky enough to have an ISP that will set this up for you
(pretty rare), all you need to do is use basic 'route' commands to get this
running. This is the most rebust solution and doesn't require any form of
IPMASQ or NAT to work.

Item #2: 1:1 NAT isn't covered in this HOWTO yet but if you need a hand, just
email me and I'll give you a hand.

Item #3: ProxyARP is pretty strait forward but only works in specific
situations and only works with Ethernet networks. Bridging is more powerful
but will probably require the re-compiling of the kernel and some advanced
configuration. Ultimately, neither of these solutions are IPMASQ anymore and
thus I can't help you set them up. Fortunately, there are other HOWTOs out
there that cover this topic:

* [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Proxy-ARP-Subnet/index.html] http://
www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Proxy-ARP-Subnet/index.html

* [ http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Adv-Routing-HOWTO/lartc.bridging.html] http:/
/www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Adv-Routing-HOWTO/lartc.bridging.html

* [http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Ethernet-Bridge-netfilter-HOWTO.html] http://
www.tldp.org/HOWTO/Ethernet-Bridge-netfilter-HOWTO.html

* [http://bridge.sourceforge.net/] http://bridge.sourceforge.net/


NOTE: If you have a bridged DSL or Cablemodem connection (not PPPoE), things
are a little more difficult because your setup isn't routed. No worries
though, check out the Bridge+Firewall Mini HOWTO and the [http://www.tldp.org
/HOWTO/mini/Bridge+Firewall+DSL.html] Bridge+Firewall+DSL Mini HOWTO. These
HOWTOs will teach you how to get your Linux box to support multiple IP
addresses on a single interface!
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.33. ( 1:1 NAT ) - I'd like to do 1:1 NAT but I can't figure out how to do
it

Please see the previous FAQ entry named Section 7.32 for all the details.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.34. ( Netstat ) - I'm trying to use the NETSTAT command to show my
Masqueraded connections but its not working

There might be a problem with the "netstat" program in 2.0.x-based Linux
distros. After a Linux reboot, running "netstat -M" works fine but after a
MASQed computer runs some successful ICMP traffic like ping, traceroute,
etc., you might see something like:

masq_info.c: Internal Error `ip_masquerade unknown type'.

The workaround for this is to use the "/sbin/ipfwadm -M -l" command. You will
also notice that once the listed ICMP masquerade entries timeout, "netstat"
works again.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.35. ( VPNs ) - I would like to get Microsoft PPTP (GRE tunnels) and/or
IPSEC (Linux SWAN) tunnels running through IP MASQ

This IS possible for specific modes. Specifically, all of the kernel versions
(2.4.x, 2.2.x, and 2.0.x) support patches to allow for both ONE or MULTIPLE
PPTP users behind a IPMASQ server to connect to the -same- PPTP server. The
2.4.x kernels currently have a PPTP module now in the newest versions of the
IPTABLES program and there is another version available on the IPMASQ WWW
site. Please check out John Hardin's [http://www.impsec.org/linux/masquerade/
ip_masq_vpn.html] PPTP Masq page for details.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.36. ( Games ) - I want to get the XYZ network game to work through IP MASQ
but it won't work. Help!

First, check Steve Grevemeyer's MASQ Applications page. If your solution
isn't listed there, try patching your Linux kernel with Glenn Lamb's http://
ipmasq.webhop.net/files20/loose-udp-2.0.36.patch.gz LooseUDP patch which is
covered in Section 6.10 above. Also check out Dan Kegel's [http://
www.alumni.caltech.edu/~dank/peer-nat.html] NAT Page for more information.

If you are technically inclined, use the program "tcpdump" and sniff your
network. Try to find out what protocols and port numbers your XYZ game is
using. With this information in hand, subscribe to the [mailto://
masq-subscribe@tiffany.indyramp.com] IP Masq email list and email your
results for help.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.37. ( Stops working ) - IP MASQ works fine for a while but then it stops
working. A reboot seems to fix this. Why?

I bet you are using IPAUTOFW and/or you have it compiled into the kernel
huh?? This is a known problem with IPAUTOFW. It is recommend to NOT even
configure IPAUTOFW into the Linux kernel and use IPPORTFW option instead.
This is covered with more details in Section 6.7.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.38. ( SMTP Relay ) - Internal MASQed computers cannot send SMTP or POP-3
mail!

Though this isn't a Masquerading issue but many users do this so it should be
mentioned.

SMTP: The issue is that you are probably using your Linux box as an SMTP
relay server and get the following error:


+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|"error from mail server: we do not relay" |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Newer versions of Sendmail and other Mail Transfer Agents (MTAs) disable
relaying by default (this is a good thing). So do the following to fix this:



* Sendmail: Enable specific relaying for your internal MASQed machines by
editing the /etc/sendmail.cw file and add the hostname and domain name of
your internal MASQed machine. You should also check to see that the /etc/
hosts file has the IP address and Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN)
configured in it. Once this is done, you need to restart Sendmail for it
to re-read its configuration files. This is covered in [http://
www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/LINUX/index-linux.html#TrinityOS] TrinityOS
- Section 25




POP-3: Some users configure their internal MASQ'ed computer's POP-3 clients
to connect to some external SMTP server. While this is fine, many SMTP
servers out there will try to IDENT your connection on port 113. Most likely
your problem stems around your default Masquerade policy being set to DENY.
This is BAD. Set it to REJECT and re-run your rc.firewall-* ruleset.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.39. ( Source Routing ) - I need different internal MASQed networks to exit
on different external IP addresses

Say you have the following setup: You have multiple internal networks and
also multiple external IP addresses and/or networks. What you want to do is
have LAN #1 to only use External IP #1 but you wan LAN #2 to use External IP
#2.

Internal LAN ----------> official IP

LAN #1 External IP #1 192.168.0.x --> 123.123.123.11

LAN #2 External IP #2 192.168.1.x --> 123.123.123.12

Basically, what we have described here is routing NOT only on the destination
address (typical IP routing) but also routing based upon the SOURCE address
as well. This is typically called "policy-based routing" or "source routing".
This functionality is NOT available in 2.0.x kernels, it *IS* available for
2.2.x kernels via the IPROUTE2 package, and it is built into the new 2.4.x
kernels using IPTABLES.

First, you have to understand that both IPFWADM and IPCHAINS get involved *
AFTER* the routing system has decided where to send a given packet. This
statement really ought to be stamped in big red letters on all IPFWADM/
IPCHAINS/IPMASQ documentation. The reason for this is that users MUST first
have their routing setup correct, then start adding IPFWADM/IPCHAINS and/or
Masq features.

Anyways, for the example case shown above, you will need to persuade the
routing system to direct packets from 192.168.0.x via 123.123.1233.11 and
packets from 192.168.1.x via 123.123.123.12. That is the hardest part and
adding Masq on top of correct routing is easy.

To do this fancy routing, you will use IPROUTE2. Because this functionality
has NOTHING to do with IPMASQ, this HOWTO does not cover this topic in great
detail. Please see Section 2.7 for complete URLs and documentation for this
topic.

The "iprule" and "iproute" commands are the same as "ip rule" and "ip route"
commands (I prefer the former since it is easier to search for.) All the
commands below are completely untested, if they do not work, please let David
Ranch know about it but please contact the IPROUTE2 email list for help. This
function has NOTHING to do with IP Masquerading.

2.4.x. kernels:

The following would be integrated into the END of your rc.firewall-iptables
ruleset
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| EXTIF="eth0" |
| INTNET1="192.168.0.0/24" |
| INTNET2="192.168.1.0/24" |
| EXTIP1="123.123.123.11" |
| EXTIP2="123.123.123.12" |
| |
| iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o $EXTIF -s $INTNET1 -j SNAT --to $EXTIP1 |
| iptables -t nat -A POSTROUTING -o $EXTIF -s $INTNET2 -j SNAT --to $EXTIP2 |
| |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------------+

2.2.x. kernels:

The first few commands only need to be done once at boot, say in /etc/rc.d/
rc.local file.


+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
|# Allow internal LANs to route to each other, no masq. |
| /sbin/iprule add from 192.168.0.0/16 to 192.168.0.0/16 table main pref 100 |
|# All other traffic from 192.168.1.x is external, handle by table 101 |
| /sbin/iprule add from 192.168.1.0/24 to 0/0 table 101 pref 102 |
|# All other traffic from 192.168.2.x is external, handle by table 102 |
| /sbin/iprule add from 192.168.2.0/24 to 0/0 table 102 pref 102 |
| |
|These commands need to be issued when eth0 is configured, perhaps in |
|/etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifup-post (for Redhat systems). Be sure to |
|do them by hand first to make sure they work. |
| |
|# Table 101 forces all assigned packets out via 123.123.123.11 |
| /sbin/iproute add table 101 via 123.123.123.11 |
|# Table 102 forces all assigned packets out via 123.123.123.12 |
| /sbin/iproute add table 102 via 123.123.123.12 |
| |
|At this stage, you should find that packets from 192.168.1.x to the |
|outside world are being routed via 123.123.123.11, packets from |
|192.168.2.x are routed via 123.123.123.12. |
| |
|It is IMPORTANT that these IPROUTE2 rules be run /BEFORE/ the rc.firewall-* |
|ruleset is run. |
| |
|If everything hangs together, the masq code will see packets being |
|routed out on 123.123.123.11 and 123.123.123.12 and will use those addresses |
|as the masq source address. |
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.40. ( IPCHAINS rulesets on 2.4.x kernels ) - What the ipchains.o module can
do on 2.4.x kernels

Some people would like to continue using their legacy IPCHAINS rulesets on
2.4.x-based kernelw. Unfortunately, unless you are only doing packet
firewalling and not trying to do any NATing (MASQ), PORTFW, or other advanced
features, you're in trouble.

* If you ARE only doing IPCHAINS filtering, all you need to do is unload
all IPTABLES modules shown from the "/sbin/lsmod" command. After that,
load the IPCHAINS module by running "/sbin/modprobe ipchains". After
that, load your IPCHAINS ruleset as normal.

+ Please note that if you compiled IPTABLES support statically into the
kernel, you CANNOT load the "ipchains" module (it shouldn't be even
present) as it will conflict with the IPTABLES kernel code. Your ONLY
option in this case is to recompile your kernel but make the IPTABLES
and IPCHAINS options as modules.



So why can't you run IPCHAINS MASQ/PORTFW functionality with a 2.4.x kernel?
Once the IPCHAINS module is loaded, you CANNOT use any IPTABLES commands or
modules since the code conflicts. In addition to this, you cannot use any
legacy 2.2.x IPCHAINS masq modules on a 2.4.x kernel as the kernels are so
radically different. Plus, this really shouldn't be an issue as all of this
functionality is available via native IPTABLES modules now. Finally, you
cannot use the IPMASQADM tool with a 2.4.x kernel as the program both won't
compile and ultimately the PORTFW kernel handlers aren't present anymore
(it's now done natively by the IPTABLES code). So, considering all of these
facts:

* You cannot run any form of PORTFW on this 2.4.x machine

* Protocols that require special handling like FTP, IRC, CuSeeme,
RealAudio, etc. will no longer work


Basically, the ipchains kernel module included with the 2.4.x kernels is
intended for basic packet firewall compatibility and NOT any NAT(MASQ)
functionality.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.41. ( IPTABLES vs. IPCHAINS vs. IPFWADM ) - Why do the 2.4.x, 2.2.x, and
2.0.x kernels use different firewall systems?

IPTABLES supports the following features that IPCHAINS and IPFWADM doesn't:



* Stateful IPv4 protocol and application tracking

* Stateful IPv6 protocol tracking

* True 1:1 and 1:Many NAT

* Built-in PORTFW functionality

* See the Section 2.6 section for more details




IPCHAINS supports the following features that IPFWADM doesn't:



* "Quality of Service" (QoS support)

* A TREE style chains system vs. LINEAR system like IPFWADM (Eg. this
allows something like "if it is ppp0, jump to this chain (which contains
its own difference set of rules)"

* IPCHAINS is more flexible with configuration. For example, it has the
"replace" command (in addition to "insert" and "add"). You can also
negate rules (e.g. "discard any outbound packets that don't come from my
registered IP" so that you aren't the source of spoofed attacks).

* IPCHAINS can filter any IP protocol explicitly, not just TCP, UDP, ICMP



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.42. ( Upgrades ) - I've just upgraded to the x.y.z kernel, why isn't IP
Masquerade working?

There are several things you should check assuming your Linux IP Masq box
already has proper connections to the Internet and your LAN:



* Make sure you have the necessary features and modules are compiled and
loaded. See earlier sections for details.

* Check /usr/src/linux/Documentation/Changes and make sure you have the
minimal requirement for the network tools installed.

* Make sure you followed all of the tests in Chapter 5 of the HOWTO.

* Make sure you are using the proper firewall tool for you kernel be it
IPTABLES, IPCHAINS, or IPFWADM.

* If you are doing PORTFW functionality, make sure you use the correct tool
for your kernel version. IPTABLES has everything built-in, IPCHAINS
requires the use of IPMASQADM, and IPFWADM reaquires the use of IPPORTFW
or IPAUTOFW. This is completely covered in Section 6.7.

* Go through all setup and configuration again! Usually, it's just a typo
or a simple mistake you are overlooking.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.43. ( EQL ) - I need help with EQL connections and IP Masq

EQL has nothing to do with IP Masq though they are commonly teamed up on
Linux boxes. Because of this, I recommend checking out the NEW version of
[http://home.indyramp.com/masq/eql/eql.html] Robert Novak's EQL HOWTO for all
your EQL needs.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.44. ( Wussing out ) - I can't get IP Masquerade to work! What options do I
have for Windows Platforms?

Looking to give up a free, reliable, high performance solution that works on
minimal hardware and pay a fortune for something that needs more hardware, is
lower performance and did I say less reliable? (IMHO. And yes, I have real
life experience with these ;-)

Okay, it's your call. If you want a Windows NAT and/or proxy solution, here
is a decent listing. I don't prefer any one of these tools over another,
especially since I haven't used them before.

* Firesock (from the makers of Trumpet Winsock)

+ Does Proxy

+ [http://www.trumpet.com.au] http://www.trumpet.com.au


* Iproute

+ DOS program designed to run on 286+ class computers

+ requires another box like Linux MASQ

+ (UNAVAILABLE) www.mischler.com/iproute/


* Microsoft Proxy

+ Requires Windows NT Server

+ Quite expensive

+ [http://www.microsoft.com] http://www.microsoft.com


* NAT32

+ Windows 95/98/NT compatible

+ [http://www.nat32.com] http://www.nat32.com

+ Roughly $25 for Win9x and $47 for Win9x and WinNT


* SyGate

+ [http://www.sygate.com] http://www.sygate.com


* Wingate

+ Does proxy

+ Costs roughly $30 for 2-3 IPs

+ [http://www.wingate.com] http://www.wingate.com


* Winroute

+ Does NAT

+ [http://www.kerio.com/kerio.html] WinRoute



Lastly, do a web search on "MS Proxy Server", "Wingate", "WinProxy", or goto
[http://www.download.com] www.download.com. And definitely DON'T tell anyone
that we sent you.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.45. ( Developers ) - I want to help with IP Masquerade development. What
can I do?

Join the Linux IP Masquerading DEVELOPERS list and ask the developers there
what you can do to help. For more details on joining the list, check out
Section 7.5 FAQ section.

Please DON'T ask NON-IP-Masquerade development related questions there!!!!
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.46. ( More INFO ) - Where can I find more information on IP Masquerade?

You can find more information on IP Masquerade at the [http://
ipmasq.webhop.net/] Linux IP Masquerade Resource that Ambrose Au maintains.

You can also find more information at [http://www.ecst.csuchico.edu/~dranch/
LINUX/index-linux.html] Dranch's Linux page where the TrinityOS and other
Linux documents are kept.

You may also find more information at [http://home.indyramp.net/mailman/
listinfo/masq] The Semi-Original Linux IP Masquerading Web Site maintained by
Indyramp Consulting, who also provides the IP Masq mailing list.

Lastly, you can look for specific questions in the IP MASQ and IP MASQ DEV
email archives or ask a specific question on these lists. Check out Section
7.5 FAQ item for more details.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.47. ( Translators ) - I want to translate this HOWTO to another language,
what should I do?

Make sure the language you want to translate to is not already covered by
someone else. But, most of the translated HOWTOs are now OLD and need to be
updated. A list of available HOWTO translations are available at the [http://
ipmasq.webhop.net/] Linux IP Masquerade Resource.

If a copy of a current IP MASQ HOWTO isn't in your proposed language, please
download the newest copy of the IP-MASQ HOWTO SGML code from the Linux IP
Masquerade Resource. From there, begin your work while maintaining good SGML
coding. For more help on SGML, check out [http://www.sgmltools.org]
www.sgmltools.org
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.48. ( Updates ) - This HOWTO seems out of date, are you still maintaining
it? Can you include more information on ...? Are there any plans for making
this better?

Yes, this HOWTO is still being maintained. In the past, Ambrose was guilty of
being too busy working on two jobs and didn't have much time to work on this,
my apologies. As of v1.50, David Ranch revamped the document and got it
current again.

If you think of a topic that could be included in the HOWTO, please send
email [mailto:dranch@trinnet.net] dranch@trinnet.net. It will be even better
if you can provide that information. We will then include the information
into the HOWTO once it is both found appropriate and tested. Many thanks for
your contributions!

We have a lot of new ideas and plans for improving the HOWTO, such as case
studies that will cover different network setup involving IP Masquerade, more
on security via strong IPFWADM/IPCHAINS firewall rulesets, IPCHAINS usage,
more FAQ entries, etc. If you think you can help, please do! Thanks.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

7.49. ( Thanks ) - I got IP Masquerade working, it's great! I want to thank
you guys, what can I do?



* Can you translate the newer version of the HOWTO to another language?

* Thank the developers and appreciate the time and effort they spent on
this.

* Join the IP Masquerade email list and support new MASQ users

* Send an email to us and let us know how happy you are

* Introduce other users to Linux and help them when they have problems.



-----------------------------------------------------------------------------